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Adapting Cutting Tools To Changing Trends

Adapting Cutting Tools To Changing Trends

Adapting Cutting Tools To Changing Trends

In an interview with Asia Pacific Metalworking Equipment News, Jacob Harpaz, ISCAR CEO, IMC President and Chairman of the Board, discusses the current trends in the metalworking tool industry, and how the company is helping their customers address their manufacturing challenges.

Jacob Harpaz

APMEN: Could you provide us with an overview of the trends that are shaping the metalworking tool industry?

Jacob Harpaz: Developments such as electric vehicles and powertrains in large volumes, additive manufacturing and cyber connectivity will mean significant changes in the style of machining and the materials being used. Workpieces will be produced more commonly at near net shapes for final machining and finishing.

By 2030 there will be big changes in the automotive sector. The major OEMs are moving away from the internal combustion engine which will mean much less metal removal will be required. There will be wider use of composite materials and the introduction of 3D printing will also mean less metal removal. At ISCAR we are preparing for these changes. Cutting tools will have to adapt to remove less metal but at much faster speeds and feeds.

Industry 4.0’s impact will not just come through sophisticated new technology such as sensors, process monitoring and acquiring machining data, but in the integration of factories and the supply and distribution of consumables used in manufacturing and products leaving the factory.

APMEN: How has ISCAR kept up with these trends?

Harpaz: ISCAR’s motto of “Machining Intelligently” represents the ongoing process of developing new products for increased productivity.  Our aim is to provide our customers with the latest technology to bring down costs.  ISCAR’s strategic philosophy is ongoing R&D that drives our business growth. As soon as we introduce to the market our newest tooling families, another team from the R&D division focuses on designing tools that will compete with these latest tools

ISCAR recently launched its “LOGIQ” cutting tools campaign featuring highly advanced cutting tool solutions for productive, high quality and efficient manufacturing in all sectors.

APMEN: What are the top three challenges that your customers are facing?

Harpaz: First, machining logically and intelligently is closely connected to today’s smart factories and the current cyber age. The cyber revolution is here, and Asian shops should quickly embrace what Industry 4.0 really means. They need to move beyond seeing Industry 4.0 as just a slogan, and this will take open-mindedness.

Next, companies need to maximise efficiency to stay ahead. They should be developing methods to collect, analyse and leverage data and utilising appropriate tools to cut faster or reduce setup, as well as implementing inventory systems that reinforce the aim of 24/7 machining. ISCAR’s “LOGIQ” product range helps to realise these goals.

Third, the ISO 13999 standard affects CAM procedures on production floors all over the world. Producing metal parts productively and profitably requires many technological changes to ensure that the process is followed correctly. To address this challenge, customers need online data such as the information that appears in ISCAR’s electronic catalog, which features assembly options.

APMEN: How are you helping them address these challenges?

Harpaz: ISCAR embraces a business culture that nurtures, strengthens and maintains strong ties with our customers. We aim to improve profitability and productivity for large and small manufacturers alike, facing every challenge as an opportunity to expand our range of solutions through focused R&D, production excellence, and close cooperation with customers to ensure the right product for their needs.

ISCAR introduced a milling tool assemblies option in E-CAT, its comprehensive electronic catalog. This new option represents a highly valuable instrument for the preliminary process in selecting tools at the design and planning stages of machining. Cutting tool data can be gathered accurately and used to create twin representations of the tools. Creating a digital twin representation of a tool assembly based on ISO 13399 facilitates the accurate communication of tool information between software systems. The assemblies are accessible in both 2D and 3D files, and the files can be downloaded directly from E-CAT on the ISCAR website.

Integrating this new function into the user’s CAM software can prevent errors on the shop floor during machining, while the ability to plan multiple tool assemblies saves time and costs in the planning process.

While we always provide the latest technology to machine the part, the productivity advantage of this technology only matters if you have the tool at the right place at the right time.

APMEN: How do you position ISCAR in the metalworking tools market in Asia?

Harpaz: The Asian market is important and presents its own challenges and opportunities; ISCAR welcomes every challenge as an opportunity for continued research and development of effective cutting solutions that match market developments and requirements.

Our commitment to combining innovation with reliability and cost consciousness, together with our wide market knowledge and penetration and a uniquely strong – and global – corporate culture, enables us to stay at the forefront of the industry and to provide our Asian customers with optimal, cost-effective solutions to their needs.

 

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