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Siemens Improves 3D Printing And Scanning Workflows

Siemens Improves 3D Printing And Scanning Workflows

The latest improvements in Siemens Digital Industries Software’s Parasolid can help enable engineers to solve the toughest technical challenges and achieve a clear and growing advantage when implementing 3D printing and scanning based workflows.

Further advances in Convergent Modeling give engineers greater efficiency in workflows that need to mix facet and B-rep geometry, while new functional foundations have been implemented to support lattice structures. Lattices are comprised of repeating networks of nodes and beams and were extremely difficult to manufacture until the advent of 3D printing. Lattices offer increased strength-to-weight ratio compared with solid material, so engineers can design parts with reduced material requirements and mass, while maintaining the required structural integrity.

Additive manufacturing techniques are now bringing the performance benefits of lattice structures into production, driving new requirements for lattice modelling in the design process. Vendors of design and manufacturing software applications that license Parasolid can help deliver the benefits of new lattice modelling functionality to their customers.

[WATCH] Siemens Discusses Initiatives, Outlook Amid COVID-19

The Parasolid geometric modelling kernel is used in Siemens’ own Solid Edge software and NX software and is at the core of the Xcelerator portfolio’s open and flexible ecosystem. Parasolid is also used by over 350 other products including many world-leading CAD/CAM/CAE/AEC software applications.

 

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Bystronic Acquires Weber Laserservice

Bystronic Acquires Weber Laserservice

Bystronic Benelux BV has taken over its long-standing service partner Weber Laserservice BV. The integration of Weber Laserservice will enable Bystronic to provide its customers with even more efficient service, while also strengthening its market position and boosting its second-hand machine market.

“With the acquisition of Weber Laserservice, which has an excellent 15-year track record on the Benelux and German markets as well as in other countries and specializes in Bystronic machines, we are achieving several goals at once,” said Marco de Jong, Managing Director of Bystronic Benelux: “This move will make us the largest and most potent service and support organization in the increasingly dynamic market, and this both on-site with our customers and in the back office. A highly experienced and superbly trained team of technicians can now provide even more effective and prompt support for customers of every size and for every generation of Bystronic machine.”

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Patrick van den Berg and Martin van de Weg, former owners of Weber Laserservice, added, “We are delighted that we will now be an integral part of our preferred partner Bystronic. The pooling of the strengths of these two companies will lead to significant additional synergies, which will translate into a considerable added value for the customers.”

Weber Laserservice specializes in the maintenance, training, installation, and sales of Bystronic laser cutting machines and also plays an important role in the second-hand market for laser cutting systems. The company has been a Bystronic certified partner for many years and has in the past been awarded the title of “Best Service Partner” of Bystronic Benelux.

In addition to service and support for flatbed lasers, pressbrakes, automation and software, these services will now also be offered for tube processing. Thus, Bystronic’s customers can rely on expert support from a single source.

“There will be no staff layoffs, because customer support is of the utmost importance to Bystronic, both now and in the future,” de Jong said. “With the integration of Weber Laserservice into Bystronic Benelux, we now cover all categories. The benefits of this increased efficiency will be felt by each and every one of our customers, regardless of which laser cutting system they are using.”

 

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CHIRON Launches First 3D Metal Printer

CHIRON Launches First 3D Metal Printer

CNC vertical milling and turning machining centre specialist CHIRON Group has developed the AM Cube, its first 3D metal printer for manufacturing larger, more complex components. Suitable for coating and repairing components, as well as printing near net shape parts, the new printer extends CHIRON’s core competencies to include additive manufacturing, alongside its existing focuses on metal machining and automation. The AM Cube 3D metal printer was one of the product highlights at CHIRON’s OPEN HOUSE ONLINE held last May 14–19.

“The Additive Manufacturing department is a start-up within our own business group,” explained Axel Boi, head of additive manufacturing at CHIRON. “With this 3D metal printer, made by CHIRON, we are creating a facility for manufacturing larger components with long procurement times and high material prices. This technology can be used effectively in the mechanical engineering, tool manufacturing, energy production and aerospace sectors. These are all important target sectors for the CHIRON Group.”

The new AM Cube is based on a conventional cartesian coordinate system, just like a CNC machining centre. Operation and programming of the AM Cube is intuitive. The system is programmed either using a standardised DIN ISO code or, for complex components, using a CAD/CAM software tool. All aspects of the system can be controlled using tried-and-tested Siemens components, from hardware to the HMI through to programming of the AM Cube.

READ: Global Aerospace 3D Printing Market Poised To Surpass $2,857 Million By 2024

READ: Accelerate Smart Additive Manufacturing with Simulation

Laser metal deposition with wire.

Laser metal deposition with wire.

Unlike other 3D metal printers, the print head of the CHIRON AM Cube can be changed during an active printing/ coating process. This option enables the AM Cube to be used to combine different process requirements: For instance, one print head could be used to achieve a high surface quality, and another could be used to achieve a high deposition rate. The automatic head change function enables these properties to be combined in a single workpiece. This is another area where the professionals at CHIRON have put their comprehensive process expertise and many years of experience in using machining centres into practice. Due to the low quantities manufactured using this process, high flexibility is a crucial factor across all industries. The AM Cube is equipped with a total of three print heads. With the AM Cube, wire and powder as deposition material can be applied within a single manufacturing process in different production phases.

Deposition welding with different raw materials

By designing a printer for the two commonly used deposition materials—wire and powder—the machining centre manufacturer has also patented a completely new technology. Both processes have their applications: While coating with powder is the most commonly used process, wire-based laser metal deposition offers better safety characteristics and an impressive reduction in waste material. Wire also has the benefit that every type of welding wire can be used for manufacturing.

The system is designed as a platform and can be reconfigured from 4-axis machining to 5-axis machining with relatively little effort. The AM Cube is equipped with cutting-edge sensors and meets all relevant safety requirements for operation without monitoring by the operator. If the AM Cube is used to machine particularly reactive materials such as titanium, the entire system can be flooded with protective gas to reduce oxidation, enabling manufacturing to be performed under a protective gas atmosphere for several hours.

 

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Share Your Insights: COVID-19 & Your Business

Share Your Insights: COVID-19 & Your Business

The COVID-19 pandemic is having an unprecedented impact on the global manufacturing supply chain. For instance, factory shutdowns have drastically impacted the metalworking supply chain around the car and auto parts manufacturing industries. While the medical equipment sector is experiencing massive demand, the grounding of airline fleets is expected to put a dent in the MRO industry—at least those segments involving metalworks.

In line with our continuing coverage of the impact of COVID-19 pandemic, we at Asia Pacific Metalworking Equipment News (APMEN) are conducting the following brief survey regarding the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak to your business. Your participation in this survey is greatly appreciated and will help ensure we are providing you and the industry with the best content possible.

Take Our Survey

 

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Aftermarket Services Could Help Transform Manufacturing In The Wake Of The COVID-19 Pandemic

Aftermarket Services Could Help Transform Manufacturing In The Wake Of The COVID-19 Pandemic

Over the past decade, new product sales for industrial manufacturers have been declining. This trend is expected to continue as some customers defer or cancel new equipment deliveries in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, which has created unprecedented economic challenges for manufacturing businesses.

However, according to a new report by Deloitte, aftermarket services are emerging as a strategic imperative for industrial manufacturers to offset declines in new equipment sales, address acute and evolving customer needs, and prepare for the future.

Higher margins and stable revenues

Aftermarket services are a stable revenue source, with 2.5 times greater operating margins than new equipment sales. The broad category, which includes the sale and delivery of maintenance, spare parts, and other value-added services, will likely continue to deliver over 50 percent of a manufacturer’s profit with an upward trend in light of COVID-19.

“Focusing on aftermarket services has proven to bring manufacturers consistent revenue and stabilized profits through past economic downturns. Today, adopting aftermarket services capabilities has become an imperative, not only to offset impacts from the pandemic and current downturn, but to capitalize on long-term changes in customer needs,” said Paul Wellener, vice chairman and U.S. industrial products and construction leader, Deloitte LLP. “Manufacturers that can leverage digital solutions to help ensure uptime for customers, while working closely with them to achieve targeted outcomes, should outperform peers in the long run.”

Digitalisation is the bedrock for success

Digital technologies will be the key differentiator for immediate and sustainable success in aftermarket services as many customers increasingly focus on uptime. For example, remote assistance capabilities have become especially crucial for manufacturers in the wake of COVID-19, where it is difficult to dispatch field service technicians to address customers’ critical equipment needs. Sophisticated digital capabilities also play a role in enhancing other offerings, such as predictive maintenance.

Timing is everything

According to the report, now is a compelling time for manufacturers to accelerate their pivot to aftermarket services or scale them more rapidly. As factories reopen, demand for digitally-enabled service offerings, such as remote assistance and predictive maintenance, could increase.

Longer term, manufacturing customers will likely demand more usage-based services, such as subscription-based pricing or pay-per-use contracts, as they remain wary of making large equipment purchases.

However, there is no “one-size-fits-all” approach for companies looking to transform their business. What will help differentiate best-practice leaders will be those who are able to manage their aftermarket business efficiently and engage customers continuously.

 

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Resilience Index Ranks Countries Well Positioned To Foster Post-pandemic Business Recovery

Resilience Index Ranks Countries Well Positioned To Foster Post-pandemic Business Recovery

Resilience has never been more critical as businesses emerge from the COVID-19 crisis and look to recovery, with top-ranked Asian countries and territories in the 2020 FM Global Resilience Index, including Hong Kong (ranked 19), Singapore (ranked 22), Japan (ranked 26), Taiwan (ranked 29) and South Korea (ranked 37), demonstrating they have the foundation in place for a robust rebound.

The annual index, published today by FM Global, one of the world’s largest commercial property insurers, is the definitive ranking of nearly 130 countries by the resilience of their business environments. It provides companies with objective information about countries’ economic, risk quality and supply chain resilience—factors that create a springboard for businesses working to recover from the pandemic.

In addition to outlining the post-pandemic business landscape, the FM Global Resilience Index stands as a dynamic reminder that conventional business risks such as typhoons, flood, drought, fire and earthquakes, continue to threaten operations and overall business value.

Amongst the index’s 12 economic, risk and supply chain-related measures of resilience that underpin a country’s overall ranking, no Asian country ranked inside the top 30 for their ‘natural hazard risk quality’—a measure of the quality and enforcement of a country’s building codes with respect to natural hazard-resistance combined with the level of risk improvement achieved. For natural hazard risk quality, Japan (ranked 32), Singapore (ranked 33), Taiwan (ranked 35) and Hong Kong (ranked 40) stand strongly in contrast to China Regions 1, 2 and 3 (ranked 91),1 Cambodia, Sri Lanka, Laos, and Nepal (all tied at 97) and Vietnam (ranked last at 130).

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Within the index, a number of Asian countries fell in 2020 in regards to ‘inherent cyber risk’ including Taiwan (from 45 to 93), Hong Kong (from 72 to 97) and Vietnam (from 103 to 116) reflecting the evolving cyber threat landscape that continues to be a board level concern and can challenge the resilience of many businesses across Asia as internet penetration increases.

“As we look ahead to post-COVID-19 recovery, resilience takes on new meaning for many businesses across Asia. The 2020 FM Global Resilience Index demonstrates that attention must still be paid to ever- present and traditional business risks, such as natural disaster and cyber security,” said Alex Tadmoury, senior vice president, division manager of FM Global’s Asia Pacific operations. “These remain obstacles for many countries across Asia, heightened by new challenges created by the pandemic. Those that endure most successfully will be those who invest in thorough risk-and-resilience analysis and timely loss prevention measures.”

Top, bottom, risers, fallers

Overall, many countries across Asia remained stable compared to previous years. Notably, a major riser in this year’s index is Taiwan, which climbed 14 places to 29th based on improvements in its urbanisation rate, natural hazard risk quality, and quality of its infrastructure. Taiwan’s urbanisation improved dramatically, moving the country up 42 places for that metric (from 122 to 80). Taiwan also has demonstrated its resilience, seeing success in containment of COVID-19.

South Korea and Japan saw improvements in their urbanisation rate, with South Korea moving up 27 places to rank at 4th place and Japan moving up 38 places to rank 24th. China significantly improved for corporate governance from last year’s ranking (from 98 to 74), indicating greater scrutiny of auditing and accounting standards, conflict of interest regulation and shareholder governance.

Overall, the index’s top-ranked regions (in descending order) are Norway, Switzerland, Demark, Germany, Sweden, Finland, Luxembourg, Austria, Central United States and Eastern United States (both the U.S. and China comprise three regions with differing natural hazard exposure).

Norway occupies the top spot again this year, supported by strong economic productivity, a stable political environment, low corruption, high natural hazard risk quality and robust corporate governance.

The bottom 10 (in descending order) are Nicaragua, Nepal, Mali, Mozambique, Iran, Lebanon, Chad, Ethiopia, Venezuela and Haiti.

The biggest faller in the index is the Dominican Republic, which fell 19 places to 90th place due to increases in its urbanisation rate and cyber risk.

How to use the index

Index data like this is designed to help chief financial officers (CFOs) and other business leaders make prudent business decisions as they site facilities, extend supply chains and cultivate customers. A lack of business resilience can result in long-lasting effects on market share, growth opportunities and investor confidence—all contributors to business value.

“Resilience is ultimately a product of the choices businesses make, including where they do business and how they invest in each location,” said Sanjay Chawla, chief investment officer at FM Global. “The index is designed to make these choices clearer as executives weigh the regular strategic reasons – logistics, labor force and market opportunity – for selecting particular geographies.”

 

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Top 21 Global Risks That Threaten The Next Decade

Top 21 Global Risks that Threaten the Next Decade

Frost & Sullivan has released a report providing a compelling analysis that will help stakeholders understand the impact of future risks through the short, medium and long terms, and equip them to act on clear growth opportunities. The study, Global Future Risks—Future-proofing Your Strategies, 2030, presents over 80 growth opportunities arising from 21 risks, which will help policymakers, businesses and individuals take immediate tactical and strategic actions and draw plans to lower impact.

Unpreparedness to address these challenges, which are looming across the globe, will adversely impact businesses, societies, economies, cultures, and personal lives.

“Risks are now increasingly interconnected, which, if amplified, can trigger a ripple effect across industries, regions, and diverse stakeholder groups. Therefore, mitigating them will involve measures to quantify relevant risks, estimate the probability of occurrence and the adoption of a cohesive, interdisciplinary, and multipronged approach,” said Murali Krishnan, Visionary Innovation Group Senior Industry Analyst at Frost & Sullivan.

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Krishnan added, “With an estimated 200 billion connected devices by 2030, the risk of sophisticated cyberattacks will escalate. Therefore, companies should invest in future-casting tools that help identify the impact of such risks to their business, thereby detecting vulnerabilities and avoiding disruptions.”

“Over 40 million Americans are at risk of flooding from rivers, nearly 300,000 have lost their lives to the COVID pandemic, and close to $1 billion in costs will be borne annually by economies as they become victims to cyberattacks. The stakes are high, claiming both lives and resources. Businesses must look to invest in early warning systems that help future-proof them against the known and the unknown. Understanding risks and its levers can become a growth opportunity if used as a tool to create value,” noted Archana Vidyasekar, Visionary Innovation Group Research Director at Frost & Sullivan.

To tap into growth opportunities emerging from the short-, mid- and long-term risks, organisations can focus on the following areas:

Short-term risks

  • Privacy and disinformation risks: Organisations must adopt a “privacy-by-design” approach, which goes beyond accepted privacy standards and assumes global regulatory compliance.
  • Rise of infectious diseases:Advanced technologies such as next-generation sequencing (NGS) and CRISPR-based diagnostics will enable new approaches in the treatment of infectious diseases.
  • Water crisis:Innovation in agricultural practices such as vertical farming and optimised crop selection can play an important role in reducing the ongoing water crisis.

Mid-term risks

  • Urbanisation: Urbanisation stress will trigger the demand for smart solutions such as intelligent grid control and electrification, smart buildings, and smart storage solutions.
  • Climate change risks: Organisations will emphasise investments in buildings with net-zero energy consumption, and greenhouse gas emissions will increase minimally.

Long-term risks

  • Artificial intelligence (AI) as a threat: AI can be a strong reason for the polarisation of jobs across the world, but investing in collaborative computational capabilities can help allocate an ideal division of tasks between humans and robots based on their distinct capabilities and deployment costs.
  • National identity crisis:Great business opportunities exist in providing digital authentication of eGovernment services such as digitisation of birth, marriage, and death certificates, passports, and driving licenses.

 

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Industrial Automation Sector Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

Industrial Automation Sector Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

The industrial automation sector was not in a great place before COVID-19 struck, having been slowed by flat capital expenditure and declining industrial production, says GlobalData in its latest report: COVID-19 Impact on Industrial Automation – Thematic Research. The virus has since closed factory after factory worldwide with workers sent home. The reality is that despite much hype over the years, advanced factory automation has not been substituted for human workers at scale.

“By the time it expires, COVID-19 may have served to at last accelerate an investment in factory automation when the global economy eventually rebounds. But that will take a while,” commented David Bicknell, principal analyst, Thematic Research at GlobalData.

Organisations that invested in robotics as part of their automation strategy will have found themselves more likely to keep on running when COVID-19 struck.

Bicknell continues: “The fallout from COVID-19 will now focus organisations on the need to automate faster in the medium term, not least to help bridge the productivity gap. Projects like Industrie 4.0, which encompass both the cyber and physical worlds, will attempt to tackle the world’s continuity productivity shortfall. It is a pressing task, made all the more urgent by COVID-19. Had business moved with more alacrity and determination when it had the opportunity, it would be in a different place. Those that missed the boat will have the motivation to prepare themselves better for future crises.

“Inside China’s COVID-19 clogged supply chain and beyond, it’s clear that preventing future plant shutdowns means making a greater investment in robotics and automation. In recent years, China has bought more robots than any other country, especially collaborative robots (co-bots). It will now have to start putting them to work,” he concluded.

 

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Pandemic Highlights The Need For Smarter, More Adaptable Cities

Pandemic Highlights the Need for Smarter, More Adaptable Cities

The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic is creating a paradigm shift: we are on the cusp of a leapfrog into a new era of digitalisation. Article by Cedrik Neike, CEO, Siemens Smart Infrastructure.

The coronavirus pandemic is a new experience for every one of us. It has changed life as we know it—at work, at home and for public interactions. As some countries start to ease restrictions on public life, how can we go back to ‘normal’ while still maintaining social distancing and feeling safe? How do we manage crowded public spaces like shopping malls, cinemas and restaurants? How do we optimise safety in our offices and factories? More importantly, how do we avoid shutting down entire cities and countries when the next pandemic hits?

While the crisis raises many questions, it also forces us to reflect on how our cities can be more human-centric and resilient in the face of unforeseeable challenges. Many would argue there are very few, if any, human-centric cities in the world. Reasons for this include air pollution, poor urban planning and traffic congestion, to name a few. However, despite the chaos of the past months I am convinced there’s a silver lining—it is in adaptability. It is now clearer than ever that the main characteristic of our future cities needs to be adaptability. Here is why I believe so.

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Adaptability as the game changer

The pandemic has given our environment a much-needed breather, but it hasn’t removed the biggest challenges we are up against. Our resources are still finite and using them efficiently so we can live sustainably on this planet remains a top priority. Today, we have a golden opportunity to reassess how technology can be applied to tackle the challenges of climate change, urbanisation and population growth. The pandemic is creating a paradigm shift: we are on the cusp of a leapfrog into a new era of digitalisation.

While 99 percent of city infrastructure remains dumb today, technologically speaking, digitalisation can make it more flexible and quicker to respond to crises. Digitalisation allows us to create a digital, adaptable twin of a city in the virtual world. We can test and simulate a city’s resiliency to events like natural disasters and pandemics. This helps us understand how adaptable it is to such events and simulate a number of responses to activate in the future.

Our goal should be to create cities that balance environmental impact and economic growth. While natural resources continue to dwindle, data is an infinite resource at our disposal. Data is at the heart of digitalisation. Using it can help us achieve this goal by eliminating waste and saving energy and cost. We are already doing that in buildings—and getting better at it. But leveraging data to the advantage of people in cities is still at its infancy. In the future, we envision smart infrastructure becoming all-sensing; an ecosystem that knows you and adapts to your needs, thanks to data and digitalisation.

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This process is continuous—in the sense that we should create an infinity loop: constant improvement based on the connection from the physical and virtual worlds. It’s like children whose brains develop based on sensory experience—gaining knowledge through feedback from senses or others: learning not to touch something hot, for example. The infinity loop for infrastructure connects input from all the sensors and experts to continuously improve the experience of those in the city and enhance the value of solutions for our customers.

All-sensing infrastructure

Sensors make all-sensing infrastructure possible. They are used almost everywhere today, from detecting earthquakes, measuring your heart rate on a fitness tracker to ensuring safety of workers on industrial sites. Data collected through these sensors is sent to a computer to be analysed and used intelligently.

The significance of sensors is growing and is only going to increase after this pandemic, with intelligent sensors contributing more to our public and private lives. This is because they allow us to monitor our surroundings like never before. The challenge is to create an ecosystem by joining all the dots.

Adaptable Cities

Today, through our subsidiary Enlighted, IoT, smart sensors collect and monitor real time occupancy, light levels, temperatures and energy use. They can distinguish between people and objects and customise controls for specific purposes. There are 3.5 million sensors installed across our customers’ buildings globally, helping them make the best use of their office space and cut energy costs. In the UK, they enable an NHS outpatient facility to cut energy spend by 80 percent annually.

Smart sensors are also useful in case of a fire—giving firefighters reliable information about the number of people and their location in the building. In other cases, they monitor air pollution, helping cities comply with clean air and emission reduction targets.

While in the past we placed sensors to protect and operate our infrastructure, now we are extending that to make our environment anticipatory, interactive and caring. We realise that using smart IoT sensors can significantly contribute to secure business continuity during a pandemic.

Possible future applications of sensors

What if a pandemic hits again? Sensors could help us continue to work in the office and meet in public by enabling social distancing. They can quantify the density in any given area at any given time, making sure people keep their distance and avoid overcrowding. This means we may not have to shut entire cities and countries in the future.

We also expect the focus on office space efficiency and utilisation to increase. It’s something we have looked at for different use cases, such as comfort or asset efficiency, for a while. In response to COVID-19, more customers are asking for applications that help them design their offices in more optimal ways. Today, 33 percent of commercial real estate space is underutilised or unused, creating an opportunity to save cost. Add to this the opportunity for a significant increase in ongoing home working, thanks to the biggest forced test in history, and the potential for reducing real estate costs becomes compelling.

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There could be more demand for critical environment applications, for example in pressurised rooms for hospitals and labs. In indoor spaces, often more polluted than outdoors, we can use occupancy data to adjust airflow, so it circulates better when there is a density of people in one area. This ensures better air circulation in supermarkets, for example.

Imagine coming to the office during a pandemic, how do we ensure infected people stay at home? Sensors can also play an important role here by measuring temperature and communicating with access control systems. Workplace apps, such as Comfy, can play a role, allowing people to only book desks that are two metres apart from the next occupied desk.

But more sensors in smart cities also raises important ethical concerns around data privacy—even if our sensors ensure anonymity.

Ethical smart infrastructure

Data privacy is about balancing what is feasible, legal and ethically right. If we want to create all-sensing infrastructure that helps preserve natural resources and tackle global challenges, we need to collect and analyse data. There will be hard choices to make—privacy vs. safety, environmental impact and convenience. Individuals have the right to decide what matters to them. We want to make sure our data is used for the limited purpose we signed up to and not misused. Global companies have a big responsibility to manage data ethically and show transparency about what is stored and for what purpose.

Let’s benefit from what we’ve learned

In summary, our world has changed forever: let’s create a new normal that benefits from new uses of technology and from the positives of the experiences of lockdown. We must take the time to reflect on what we want to take forward—more home working, increased virtual collaboration, fewer airmiles and corresponding carbon footprint reduction, flexible working to gain more hours with family. Even a recognition of what really matters in life.

Data exchange will be key to making our cities more adaptable and resilient to crises. With the right setup, the infrastructure that is most adaptable to change—be it pandemics, natural disasters or climate change – will not only survive but also help society to thrive.

 

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Tungaloy Ceramic Insert Grade Conquers Turning Of Cylinder Liners

Tungaloy Ceramic Insert Grade Conquers Turning of Cylinder Liners

Tungaloy Corp. has launched the TZ120 grade ceramic inserts designed for efficient machining of cast iron.

A zirconia-toughened aluminum oxide grade with superior thermal properties, TZ120 enables extended tool life and process security at high cutting speeds, making the grade ideal for high-speed, dry machining of centrifugally cast cylinder liners. The new grade will allow Tungaloy’s extensive line-up of ceramic insert grades to provide a variety of cast iron turning solutions at high speeds.

Its key properties include tough ceramic grade with chemical and thermal stability, providing excellent resistance to strong acids at elevated temperatures. The uniform distribution of the zirconia grains in the alumina matrix imparts superior fracture and notch wear resistance, preventing premature insert failure during demanding operations

Ideal for machining of centrifugally cast iron cylinder liners, the inserts are designed for dry machining only as the use of cutting fluids is detrimental to insert life.

 

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