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Smart Manufacturing Market To Reach US$573B By 2027

Smart Manufacturing Market to Reach US$573B By 2027

The global smart manufacturing market is expected to reach $573 billion by 2027, growing at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of around 13 percent during the 2020–2027 forecast period, according to Acumen Research and Consulting.

Smart manufacturing is a method to automate manufacture of products and transaction processes. Intelligent manufacturing requires the use of automation devices and the purpose of this phase is to use information technology (IT) to support the global economy. This output reduces the workload and makes the process more efficient.

The smart manufacturing network enables the usage of integrated equipment for automated processing of the manufacturing company. These development markets are growing due to various sectors, like automobile or process manufacturers, such as chemicals and oil and gas. Smart manufacturing reduces depletion and increases manufacturing performance significantly—thus increasing productivity and resulting in long-term cost advantages.

READ: Smart Manufacturing, Digital Continuity To Provide More Visibility In Factories Of The Future

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Market dynamics

The key driving factor in the growth of the smart manufacturing market is the advances in technology and the development of more innovative technologies and products, including cloud computing, sensors, robots, 3D printing, and Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), among others.

Another major factor that is having a significant effect on market growth is the significant developments undertaken by technology suppliers as well as businesses to introduce innovative technologies to maximize productivity minimize manufacturing errors and automate processes.

Some of the most important factors for smart manufacturing development are the positive influence of policy programs and investments in supporting smart manufacturing. It is anticipated it will continue to boost growth in both developed and developing economies. For instance, the China 2025 Made in China Plan will spend more than $3 trillion in advanced manufacturing.

Another significant factor that is projected to fuel the demand growth of smart manufacturing is the increasing emphasis among manufacturers on real-time data analysis. This is to increase visibility in terms of predictive system maintenance, in order to prevent repairs during operations.

 

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TMR: CNC Market To Reach $115B By 2027

TMR: CNC Market to Reach $115B by 2027

The increasing focus on production efficiency is aiding the uptake of computer numerical controls (CNC) technologies as these machines streamline various operational processes by reducing production time and minimizing human error.

The highly competitive environment has compelled players to focus on efficient manufacturing techniques. They are also trying to gain competitive advantage by redesigning their manufacturing facilities to include CNC machines. The integration of 3D printing with CNC machines is one such addition to some of the new production units, which is expected to offer better product design with little to no resource wastage.

Fuelled by these factors, the global market for computer numerical controls is projected to grow from a value of $64 billion in 2018 to $115.1 billion by 2027, according to a study by Transparency Market Research (TMR). If these values hold true, the CNC market is expected to register a CAGR of 6.7 percent during the forecast period.

READ: Are Cheaper CNC Machine Tools More Cost Effective?

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Automated Manufacturing Driving Demand for CNC in Industrial and Automotive Sectors

Based on type, the global CNC market is led by lathe machines, and the segment is poised to dominate the market throughout the forecast period. The demand for lathe machines can be attributed to a wide application area.

On the other hand, milling machines are anticipated to register a strong growth rate during the forecast period. Milling machines are compatible with a wide range of materials and surfaces and help improve overall efficiency. Furthermore, technological innovation has led to the development of advanced milling machines that can provide a more consistent finish to the products.

In terms of application, the industrial segment held the dominant share and is likely to retain its lead through 2027. The growing demand for automated manufacturing in the industrial sector resulted in the increasing uptake of CNC machines. The establishment of manufacturing facilities in developing regions such as Asia Pacific has also spurred the usage of CNC technologies in this sector. The automotive sector, on the other hand, is set to be the most rapidly developing segment in the coming years thanks to the soaring rate of automated automobile manufacturing.

North America Continues to Present Immense Scope Despite Market Saturation

From a geographical viewpoint, the global market for computer numerical controls is led by Asia Pacific, with the region accounting for a share of approximately 35 percent in 2018. Developing economies such as China and India have been witnessing robust growth in terms of industrialization, thereby propelling the regional market. The automotive sector has been estimated to register rapid growth in the Asia Pacific CNC market during the forecast period owing to the rising demand for automobiles in the region. In addition, the easy availability of labour and the declining prices of components have resulted in manufacturers shifting their production units in this region. This is further propelling the APAC CNC market.

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Meanwhile, considering that the United States is the one of the earliest adapters of new technologies, the North America market for CNC machines is relatively saturated. Be that as it may, rising concerns over global warming and depleting energy reserves have led to the production of alternative sources of power such as solar, water, and wind, and this has significantly upped the demand for CNC machines in the region. CNC machines are actively used in power generation as the process requires wide-scale automation.

Key Driving Factors, Promising Avenues, and Challenges

Some of the key growth dynamics in the CNC market are:

  • The drive for automated manufacturing in various industries is a key trend driving the expansion of the CNC market.
  • Industries, notably automotive, have increasingly adopted automated machine control technologies to improve operational efficiencies and reduce overall costs.
  • In numerous developing and developed countries around the world, growing emphasis on reducing the carbon footprint of manufacturing has spurred growth in the CNC market.
  • Over the past few years, deployment of 3D manufacturing technologies have been at the forefront for industries, bolstering demand for CNC.

Despite the attractive potential of CNC in industrial automation, such technologies require substantial investment. The maintenance and servicing is also cost-intensive, resulting in small-scale enterprises to avoid the adoption. All these are proving to significantly constrain the growth of the CNC market.

On the other hand, the incredible drive for efficiency gains is a key business proposition for the rise in demand in the CNC market.

 

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Flexible Sawing Solution For Additively Manufactured Parts

Flexible Sawing Solution for Additively Manufactured Parts

The growing additive manufacturing industry has demanded new requirements in the sawing process. Article by Behringer.

Additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, has become more and more important in nearly all industries. 3D printing is a ground-breaking and innovative technology that has the potential to bring intermediate changes in manufacturing, society and business. As a crucial medium connecting the virtual and actual world, 3D printing enables the transformation of digital files into tangible objects.

According to market analyst firm Inkwood Research, the global 3D printing market is expected to register a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 17 percent from 2019 to 2027 and reach a value of US$ 44.39 billion at the end of the forecast period. While North America is the dominating region, Asia Pacific is the fastest growing market for 3D printing.

One important and growing segment of the 3D printing market is the metal additive manufacturing industry. Metal additive manufacturing is increasingly becoming popular among automobile manufacturers across the world. This is because additive manufacturing helps automakers to build stronger and lighter parts within a short period. The technology is now widely adopted by various Formula 1 teams, including Scuderia Ferrari, Williams Martini Racing, and Mercedes-AMG Petronas to produce lighter components such as rear wings, gearbox assemblies, and bodywork to improve the performance of their cars. Many supercar manufacturers are also adopting metal additive manufacturing to reduce overall cost, lead time, and weight. The rising adoption of metal additive manufacturing in the automobile industry is expected to fuel the growth of the market. According to a report by market analyst Technavio, the metal additive manufacturing industry is expected to grow by $4.42 billion during 2020–2024. 

High Sawing Precision

The additive manufacturing processes make it possible to produce simple as well as complex parts in different materials. 3D printing offers many advantages, such as higher design flexibility, and the individualization of the products (a batch size of one). From a process perspective, the additively manufactured parts are printed on a base plate via a supporting structure. To use and process the 3D printed parts, they have to be detached from the base plate.

To address this trend, and in line with the 100th anniversary of Behringer, the company expanded its product portfolio with the release of its 3D-Series of sawing machines. Available in two models—the two models HBE320-523 3D and LPS-T 3D—the high-performance sawing machines were developed for cutting additively manufactured parts in different sizes and shapes.

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Heraeus AMLOY, Trumpf Open Door To Industrial 3D Printing Of Amorphous Metals

Heraeus AMLOY, Trumpf Open Door To Industrial 3D Printing Of Amorphous Metals

Heraeus AMLOY and Trumpf have started working together on the 3D printing of amorphous metals, also known as metallic glasses, with the aim of establishing the printing of amorphous parts as a standard production method on the shop floor by improving process and cost efficiencies.

Amorphous metals are twice as strong as steel, yet significantly lighter and more elastic. They exhibit isotropic behaviour, which means their material properties remain identical, regardless of the direction in which the 3D printer builds up the workpiece. In addition to creating highly robust parts, 3D printing also gives engineers more freedom in the design process. A number of areas could benefit from 3D printing of amorphous metals. Key examples include parts that are subject to significant stresses and lightweight design in sectors such as aerospace and mechanical engineering. These materials are also an excellent choice for medical devices due to their biocompatibility.

“3D printing of amorphous components in industry is still in its infancy. This new collaboration will help us speed up printing processes and improve surface quality, ultimately cutting costs for customers. This will make the technology more suitable for a wider range of applications, some of which will be completely new,” said Jürgen Wachter, head of the Heraeus AMLOY business unit.

“Amorphous metals hold potential for numerous industries. For example, they can be used in medical devices – one of the most important industries for additive manufacturing. That’s why we believe this collaboration is such a great opportunity to make even more inroads into this key market with our industrial 3D printing systems,” said Klaus Parey, managing director Trumpf Additive Manufacturing.

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The new TruPrint 2000 3D printer from TRUMPF is the ideal choice for printing amorphous metals from Heraeus AMLOY.

The new TruPrint 2000 3D printer from Trumpf is the ideal choice for printing amorphous metals from Heraeus AMLOY.

Amorphous metals are formed by cooling molten metal extremely quickly. A 3D printer can then build them into larger, more complex parts—something that other methods are unable to do. This opens the door to new industrial applications for amorphous metals. 3D printing also exploits the considerable potential that amorphous metals hold for lightweight design. A 3D printer only builds structures that actually help a part fulfil its function, so material use and weight are kept to a minimum. For their part, amorphous metals are very light by nature, so the combination of 3D printing and amorphous metals can reduce weight in all sorts of applications. 3D printing makes the production of amorphous parts faster and simpler in a wide range of contexts. The technology enables users to build parts in one piece instead of making components one by one and then assembling them into a finished part.

In this cooperation, Heraeus AMLOY combines its expertise in the production and processing of amorphous metals with Trumpf’s experience in additive manufacturing. Heraeus AMLOY has optimized its amorphous alloys for 3D printing and tailored the material for use with Trumpf’s TruPrint systems. The latest-generation TruPrint 2000 machine is a particularly good choice for printing amorphous metals. The machine is designed in such a way that the excess powder can be prepared in an inert gas environment for the subsequent building process. This protects the powder from any adverse influences. This is a key benefit for amorphous metals because they react so quickly with oxygen. Trumpf has also boosted the productivity of the TruPrint 2000. Two 300-watt lasers scan the machine’s entire build chamber in parallel. Using a laser focal diameter of just 55 micrometers, users can carry out both low and high-volume production of amorphous parts with extremely high surface quality. The “Melt Pool Monitoring” function automatically monitors the quality of the melt pool, so any errors in the process are spotted at an early stage.

Customers that already have a Trumpf 3D printer can now use it to process zirconium-based alloys from Heraeus AMLOY. It is also possible to order 3D-printed amorphous parts directly from Heraeus AMLOY. The two partners are also hoping to make copper- and titanium-based alloys available for 3D printing in the future.

 

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3D Printing Plays Vital Role In New Normal

3D Printing Plays Vital Role in New Normal

COVID-19 has disrupted every aspect of life, accelerating changes in everything from simple daily tasks to traditional key business models; citizens worldwide are preparing for a new normal. In addition to vast social ramifications, the fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic has exposed the fragility and complicated nature of both manufacturing and supply chains as well as their susceptibility to disruption from disease, political unrest, or natural disaster.

Out of necessity, manufacturers in the new normal will build factories much closer to where critical parts are needed, reduce the human workforce, and rely more on software and efficiency technologies like 3D printing. At the epicentre of this sea of change is Sigma Labs Inc., with its revolutionary patented technology that detects and identifies defects and anomalies in real-time during the 3D printing process of metal, paving the way for scalability and economic efficiency.

Amazon.com Inc. has created a blueprint for consumer supply chain evolution, proving the importance of bringing outputs closer to where they are needed. Microsoft Corp. has turned its software prowess toward 3D printing in a consortium that has created a modern manufacturing 3D printing file format, 3MF. For additive manufacturing, this new format replaces older file formats and eliminates many interoperability issues.

Software behemoth Autodesk Inc. makes a broad range of 3D software tools, essential for rapid prototyping and industrial manufacturing, for almost every industry. Engineering simulation software from ANSYS Inc. allows innovation to flow smoothly through design, testing and into 3D printing manufacturing. Software and technology are becoming increasingly important as the world grapples with how to reinvent social interaction and commerce in the post pandemic era.

3D Metal Printing: The Promise and Challenge

Almost daily news reports attest to the speed, agility, and efficiency of 3D printing to create and deliver desperately needed healthcare equipment and devices. Additive manufacturing (AM) is proving in real time that it speeds production, allows flexibility, and brings new ideas to market quicker at lower cost.

Though 3D printing of plastics and polymers has moved easily into the mainstream, and home printers now sell for under $300, 3D metal printing is proving to be a horse of a different colour. Commercial 3D metal printing is gaining vital importance in the entire global manufacturing sector—yet the efficiency it yields is not without challenges. A myriad of variables from machines to materials create production hurdles in metal additive manufacturing. 3D metal part manufacturing continuously welds 10- to 30-micron layers of powdered metal together with a laser to sculpt a final three-dimensional product. Like something from science fiction, a machine is actually creating the metal of a part while simultaneously forming the shape of the part.

As amazing as this process is, metal additive manufacturers lack any assurance that each newly formed part meets precise specifications in every 10-micron layer of a 3D part. As a result, 3D metal printing manufacturers have been forced to rely on costly and time-consuming post-production inspection techniques such as CT scan inspection—which are effective, but also extremely costly.

To meet the supply chain demands of the new normal, achieve high quality volume yields and slash post-production inspection costs, the quality assurance problem in 3D metal manufacturing requires a solution. Third party in-process quality assurance is critical to the adoption and acceleration of metal AM and imperative to adaptation of the new normal of global manufacturing.

Sigma Labs’ Solution

With its patented PrintRite3D software, Sigma Labs presents a solution to the costly quality-control challenges that impede the volume manufacture of precision 3D metal parts. In doing so, Sigma Lab’s software could easily become indispensable in the global efforts to meet the manufacturing challenges of post COVID. The company’s breakthrough software has the potential to bolster and broaden commercial metal additive manufacturing by enabling for the first time cost-effective, non-destructive quality assurance during the production process. PrintRite3D is the leading technology in identifying and classifying defects and anomalies in-process and allows for errors to be corrected in real-time—even remotely.

From its inception by scientists at Los Alamos, Sigma Labs has led the world in developing software that addresses serious quality assurance issues in metal additive manufacturing and has become the leading provider of in-process, quality assurance software to the commercial 3D metal printing industry. Sigma Labs’ breakthrough software looks to be the missing element to fully enable commercial additive metal manufacturing at scale. The company has rocketed from beta development and third-party validation of efficacy to engaging multiple beta customers with some of the biggest names in industry, to use in prestigious universities and R&D institutes, and now to commercialization in an untapped market estimated at over $2 billion dollars.

Sigma Labs has surrounded its IP portfolio with 34 issued and pending patents both domestically and across the globe. These patents encompass the fundamental technologies underlying Sigma Labs’ melt-pool process control, data analytics, anomaly detection, signature identification and future closed-loop-control of 3D metal printing.

Many believe that Sigma Labs’ PrintRite3D is the singular solution the additive manufacturing industry needs. PrintRite3D integrates inspection, feedback, data collection and critical analysis into a unified platform. Unheard of before in the industry, PrintRite3D uniquely leverages thermal signatures to monitor the quality of each product part in the production process, layer by layer and in real time. This allows operators to correct or stop production of a defective part, even remotely, which results in reduced error rates and higher yields and scalability. This incredibly sophisticated and powerful technology may play a key role in the new normal post-pandemic era.

Confluence of Opportunity and Circumstance

3D printing was already posting an astounding CAGR of nearly 30 percent before the world was beset by this virus, and with the impending shifts in supply chain strategy, it’s hard to imagine that 3D printing won’t expand at even greater rates. Industry 4.0 has been underway, and 3D printing remains at the forefront of the $100 trillion-dollar technological transformation, accelerating the confluence of digital, biological, and physical innovations across the planet. The circumstances of this virus will only expedite industry and societal adoption of these transformations.

Sigma Labs enjoys a significant technological lead with formidable barriers of entry, which effectively impedes any potential competition. The company has established strategic partnerships, surrounded the IP with patents and is laser focused on the opportunity ahead. Interestingly, Sigma Lab’s unique business model accelerates both revenue growth and profitability in direct correlation to the explosive industry growth of additive manufacturing. Sigma Labs’ technology is a critical component in a major disruptive industry and has been validated across all major customer segments.

Sigma Lab’s functionality and coverage of 3D printers as well as the depth and breadth of its market footprint are as yet unmatched in the industry by any other third-party solution. The company has identified an addressable market in 2021–2027 of approximately $2 billion and is well on the way to achieving its strategy and mission statement to accelerate the adoption of AM and become the de facto standard for third-party in-process quality assurance of metal 3D printing.

As suppliers continue to seek ways to improve the efficiency of their supply chains while maintaining a strong bottom line, potentially moving production centres closer to distribution outlets, 3D metal printing’s capability and promise have the potential to resonate with industries of all kinds. Sigma Lab’s revolutionary software could prove crucial to reducing time and cost of product development, qualification, and post-processing quality assurance as factories of the future respond to the challenges of the times.

Business in the New Normal

Amazon has already done much to change the shape of supply chains. Its movement of distribution centres closer to the consumer  reflects some of the benefits of 3D printing by producing products closer to where needed. This has allowed Amazon incredible efficiencies, leading to next-day, same-day, and even two-hour delivery of products. Its efficient delivery service has made Amazon a critical resource for many during the COVID-19 crisis.

Software giant Microsoft has extensive experience with supply chain interruption and 3D printing, even before the virus made its presence felt in the United States. Microsoft was hit early on by the effects of the virus in China and the measures needed to control it. Microsoft also invested in the technology several years ago, indicating its confidence in the potential of 3D printing in manufacturing.

Autodesk describes its work as making software for people who make things. The company makes a broad range of 3D software tools for almost every industry, essential for rapid prototyping and industrial manufacturing. Its recent alliance with Aurigo Software provides integrated solutions for the design, manufacture, and production of everything from towering skyscrapers to tiny gadgets. One of six companies creating the Large Additive Subtractive Integrated Modular Machine (LASIMM), one of the world’s largest hybrid manufacturing machines, Autodesk is rapidly bringing 3D printing up to industrial scale across multiple components and sectors.

ANSYS develops multi-physics engineering simulation software for product design, testing and operation. By simulating the performance of products under stress, its software exposes weaknesses in designs, significantly reducing the time and cost involved in bringing production online. Using its products for a complete simulation workflow can help companies move additive metal production from R&D to successful manufacturing operations. Sigma Labs looks to integrate its QA software with ANSYS’s simulation software, to further improve this workflow.

As the world continues to witness the disruption of traditional business models due to the fallout from COVID-19, technological innovations will play an increasingly important role in adjusting to the new normal.

 

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Siemens Improves 3D Printing And Scanning Workflows

Siemens Improves 3D Printing And Scanning Workflows

The latest improvements in Siemens Digital Industries Software’s Parasolid can help enable engineers to solve the toughest technical challenges and achieve a clear and growing advantage when implementing 3D printing and scanning based workflows.

Further advances in Convergent Modeling give engineers greater efficiency in workflows that need to mix facet and B-rep geometry, while new functional foundations have been implemented to support lattice structures. Lattices are comprised of repeating networks of nodes and beams and were extremely difficult to manufacture until the advent of 3D printing. Lattices offer increased strength-to-weight ratio compared with solid material, so engineers can design parts with reduced material requirements and mass, while maintaining the required structural integrity.

Additive manufacturing techniques are now bringing the performance benefits of lattice structures into production, driving new requirements for lattice modelling in the design process. Vendors of design and manufacturing software applications that license Parasolid can help deliver the benefits of new lattice modelling functionality to their customers.

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The Parasolid geometric modelling kernel is used in Siemens’ own Solid Edge software and NX software and is at the core of the Xcelerator portfolio’s open and flexible ecosystem. Parasolid is also used by over 350 other products including many world-leading CAD/CAM/CAE/AEC software applications.

 

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CHIRON Launches First 3D Metal Printer

CHIRON Launches First 3D Metal Printer

CNC vertical milling and turning machining centre specialist CHIRON Group has developed the AM Cube, its first 3D metal printer for manufacturing larger, more complex components. Suitable for coating and repairing components, as well as printing near net shape parts, the new printer extends CHIRON’s core competencies to include additive manufacturing, alongside its existing focuses on metal machining and automation. The AM Cube 3D metal printer was one of the product highlights at CHIRON’s OPEN HOUSE ONLINE held last May 14–19.

“The Additive Manufacturing department is a start-up within our own business group,” explained Axel Boi, head of additive manufacturing at CHIRON. “With this 3D metal printer, made by CHIRON, we are creating a facility for manufacturing larger components with long procurement times and high material prices. This technology can be used effectively in the mechanical engineering, tool manufacturing, energy production and aerospace sectors. These are all important target sectors for the CHIRON Group.”

The new AM Cube is based on a conventional cartesian coordinate system, just like a CNC machining centre. Operation and programming of the AM Cube is intuitive. The system is programmed either using a standardised DIN ISO code or, for complex components, using a CAD/CAM software tool. All aspects of the system can be controlled using tried-and-tested Siemens components, from hardware to the HMI through to programming of the AM Cube.

READ: Global Aerospace 3D Printing Market Poised To Surpass $2,857 Million By 2024

READ: Accelerate Smart Additive Manufacturing with Simulation

Laser metal deposition with wire.

Laser metal deposition with wire.

Unlike other 3D metal printers, the print head of the CHIRON AM Cube can be changed during an active printing/ coating process. This option enables the AM Cube to be used to combine different process requirements: For instance, one print head could be used to achieve a high surface quality, and another could be used to achieve a high deposition rate. The automatic head change function enables these properties to be combined in a single workpiece. This is another area where the professionals at CHIRON have put their comprehensive process expertise and many years of experience in using machining centres into practice. Due to the low quantities manufactured using this process, high flexibility is a crucial factor across all industries. The AM Cube is equipped with a total of three print heads. With the AM Cube, wire and powder as deposition material can be applied within a single manufacturing process in different production phases.

Deposition welding with different raw materials

By designing a printer for the two commonly used deposition materials—wire and powder—the machining centre manufacturer has also patented a completely new technology. Both processes have their applications: While coating with powder is the most commonly used process, wire-based laser metal deposition offers better safety characteristics and an impressive reduction in waste material. Wire also has the benefit that every type of welding wire can be used for manufacturing.

The system is designed as a platform and can be reconfigured from 4-axis machining to 5-axis machining with relatively little effort. The AM Cube is equipped with cutting-edge sensors and meets all relevant safety requirements for operation without monitoring by the operator. If the AM Cube is used to machine particularly reactive materials such as titanium, the entire system can be flooded with protective gas to reduce oxidation, enabling manufacturing to be performed under a protective gas atmosphere for several hours.

 

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Formula Student Team Used AM To Produce Oil Cooling System For Electric Racers

Formula Student Team Used AM To Produce Oil Cooling System For Electric Racers

The Formula Student team from Stuttgart solved the thermal stress issues in electric racers by creating an oil cooling system though additive manufacturing (AM). Article by EOS. 

Racers must keep a cool head—and their cars should not overheat either. This applies equally to racing cars with combustion engines and electric motors. The difference: in fuel-fired racers the engine has to be tempered, in electric vehicles this must be considered in particular for the accumulator. The Formula Student team from Stuttgart has solved this task in the truest sense of the word with an additively manufactured oil cooling system and support from EOS.

Challenge

A complex battery system requires powerful heat dissipation—no big deal thanks to additive manufacturing. (Source: GreenTeam Uni Stuttgart)

A battery—as accumulators are called today—for an electric car has diva-like characteristics. It needs to be treated with caution. This applies not only to mechanical stress, but also to thermal stress: It doesn’t like temperatures that are too high or too low. The reason for this is the behaviour of the electron flow: If it is too cold, the electrons do not migrate fast enough for the maximum power output due to the higher internal resistance. If the temperature is too high, for example if the maximum power output is maintained for a longer period or if the climate is simply hot, there is a risk that membranes will be destroyed or that they will age more rapidly, even to the extent of the so-called thermal runaway. 

In order to guarantee an optimum working range, appropriate systems are necessary; liquid-based solutions have the advantage that they can also heat the cells and thus maintain high performance – which is of course of central importance in racing. Oil cooling systems offer very good properties for the battery, but can only be realized with great effort using traditional construction methods: The filled quantity should be kept as low as possible in order to save weight. This also reduces space requirements, which plays a major role not only in tightly cut racing cars.

“In addition, the flow characteristics in the system are important for achieving a high volumetric flow rate,” says Florian Fröhlich from the Stuttgart Formula Student GreenTeam. “Several aspects have to be considered in order to secure an optimum flow velocity, including the expedient design and the lowest possible surface resistance.”

The aim of the racing team was to ensure that a major part of the fluid constantly circulates in the area of the cell flags. Additionally, as oil is quite aggressive, the chosen material must feature a certain level of chemical resistance, while at the same time it must follow the lightweight character of the entire project. High fire resistance is obligatory in racing anyway.

Solution

The young racing team set to work with this sporty technical wish list. Simulations on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) resulted in the expedient design of the cooling system, which is made up of flux direction parts and inlet devices. The geometry was optimized in such a way, that a consistent flow is created through the outlets with their compact design and high surface quality. Due to the planned construction geometry and the incorporated hollow structures as well as, of course, the very small number of units, additive manufacturing was the best choice for the production process: The required flow properties would not have been reproducible with traditional methods.

 

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DOST Metals Industry Research And Development Center Is Mass Producing 5000 Face Shields Daily

DOST Metals Industry Research and Development Center Is Mass Producing 5000 Face Shields Daily

The Department of Science and Technology – Metals Industry Research and Development Center (DOST-MIRDC) is ramping up production of medical face shields to meet the Philippines’ demands for personal protective equipment (PPEs) for the frontline workers battling COVID-19.

Through its Additive Manufacturing Center, DOST-MIRDC was initially producing 50 3D printing face shields a day. To ramp up its production, DOST-MIRDC has fabricated a plastic injection mould at the Die and Mould Solution Center in its Bicutan, Taguig City compound. Using plastic injection technology, it has boosted its production capabilities to 2,500 face shields a day.

READ: The AMable Project Promotes Flexible AM Solutions To Fight The Coronavirus

Furthermore, DOST-MIRDC has partnered with Omnifab, which fabricated another injection mould, and Megasamsotite Plant in San Pedro, Laguna which serves as another site for mass production—totalling production of another 2,500 face shields daily.

“With the mass production of the medical face shields being done simultaneously in Laguna and in Taguig, we can assure the enhanced protection of our frontliners,” said Engr. Fred P. Liza, Chief of the Materials and Process Research Division, and Project Leader of the DOST-MIRDC’s Advanced Manufacturing Center (AMCen).

READ: Automotive Manufacturing Developments In Southeast Asia Amid COVID-19

In addition, the Industrial Technology Development Institute (ITDI), another DOST R&D institute has 3D printed 100 face shields for Philippine Heat Center.

“As we make change happen through research and development, we find ways in helping out our new heroes facing COVID-19. We shall continue to look for better means to support our frontliners through research and development,” said Rowena Guevara, DOST undersecretary for R&D.

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EOS Launches Versatile Online Platform To Fight Further Spread Of The Virus

EOS Launches Versatile Online Platform To Fight Further Spread Of The Virus

EOS has launched a versatile online platform and LinkedIn Group to support the battle against COVID-19 on all levels.

In times of crisis individuals, organisations and governments need to stand together. EOS is developing solutions and utilising their network to facilitate inspirational exchange. The team leveraged its global network of suppliers, partners, customers and the broader EOS community.

READ: HP Inc. And Partners Battles COVID19 With 3D Printing Solutions

EOS’s open platform initiative features relevant data, impactful projects, and offers valuable files free to download – ready to print. All of these are designed to support pandemic-fighting and life-saving approaches. The 3DAgainstCorona site will be updated on a regular basis.

“Improving people’s lives with the help of 3D printing has always been our aspiration. The current pandemic now calls for a joint approach, more than ever before. Today, we are asking all supporters to join us in tackling the challenges that lay ahead of us. Let’s do what our technology is enabling us for: Let’s think differently and push the boundaries of what is possible,” said Marie Langer, CEO of EOS.

During a pandemic, scalable and on-demand capabilities become key

The key goal for governments worldwide currently is to maintain adequate patient care. Those fighting COVID-19 on the frontlines are often lacking proper protection equipment due to difficulties in supplying the vast numbers needed e.g. in hospitals worldwide.

READ: Fight Against Corona: TRUMPF Retrofits Mini-Lasers For Ventilators

At the same time, the challenges continue while trying to meet the immense demand for medical devices, protective clothing and masks. Federal governments are approaching both traditional and 3D printing manufacturers to support production scaling of medical equipment needed in a pandemic.

One of the most valuable benefits additive manufacturing can contribute here is that it can help to reduce the sole dependence on traditional supply chains. Based on AM, critical shortages can be more rapidly addressed. Moreover, traditional manufacturing ramp up is accelerated and further supply chain shortages can be eliminated via digital manufacturing.

READ: Impact of COVID-19 On The Automotive Manufacturing Supply Chain

At the same time, the latter also enables a more distributed manufacturing. Data can be shared or sent across the globe and products can be 3D printed where they are most needed. Which becomes even more important during a pandemic when supply chains are disrupted by international shutdowns and transport restrictions.

 

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