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HP Opens 3D Printing And Additive Manufacturing Facility In Spain

HP Opens 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing Facility in Spain

HP Inc. has opened a 3D Printing and Digital Manufacturing Centre of Excellence in Barcelona, Spain, bringing together hundreds of the world’s leading additive manufacturing experts in more than 150,000 square feet of cutting-edge innovation space to transform the way the world designs and manufactures. The centre is considered to be one of the world’s largest and most advanced R&D facilities for the next-generation technologies powering the Fourth Industrial Revolution (Industry 4.0).

The facility at HP’s Barcelona campus is dedicated to the development of HP’s industrial 3D printing portfolio and provides a large-scale factory environment to collaborate with customers and partners on the digital manufacturing technologies revolutionising their industries.

“HP’s new 3D Printing and Digital Manufacturing Centre of Excellence is one of the largest and most advanced 3D printing and digital manufacturing research and development centres on earth—it truly embodies our mission to transform the world’s biggest industries through sustainable technological innovation,” said Christoph Schell, President of 3D Printing and Digital Manufacturing at HP. “We are bringing HP’s substantial resources and peerless industrial 3D printing expertise together with our customers, partners, and community to drive the technologies and skills that will further unleash the benefits of digital manufacturing.”

The new centre unites hundreds of experts in systems engineering, data intelligence, software, materials science, design, and 3D printing and digital manufacturing applications in what is believed to be the world’s largest population of additive manufacturing specialists in one location.

Specifically designed for active collaboration across HP engineering and R&D groups, customers, and partners, the new facility integrates flexible and interactive layouts, co-development environments, and fleets of the latest HP plastics and metals 3D production systems to drive more rapid and agile product development and end-to-end solutions for customers. Companies like BASF, GKN Metallurgy, Siemens, Volkswagen and others across the automotive, industrial, healthcare, and consumer goods sectors will continue collaborating with HP on new 3D printing and digital manufacturing innovations at the centre.

HP’s new Barcelona Centre significantly expands HP’s global 3D printing and digital manufacturing footprint and enhances existing innovation locations in Corvallis, Oregon; Palo Alto, California; San Diego, California; Vancouver, Washington; Barcelona, Spain; and Singapore, where HP recently launched a ground-breaking collaboration with Nanyang Technological University (NTU) and the Singapore National Research Foundation (NRF) to drive 3D printing, artificial intelligence, machine learning, materials and applications, and cybersecurity innovations.

 

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Nano Dimension And Harris To Develop 3D-Printed Hardware That Will Fly On The International Space Station

Nano Dimension And Harris To Develop 3D-Printed Hardware That Will Fly On The International Space Station

Nano Dimension Ltd, an additive manufacturing solutions provider, has received a grant approval from the Israel Innovation Authority for developing hardware, in cooperation with Harris Corporation, that will fly on the International Space Station (ISS) and communicate with Harris’ ground-based satellite tracking station in Florida, USA. This project will provide a systematic analysis of 3D printed materials for radio frequency (RF) space systems, especially for nano-satellites.

The total approved budget for the Israeli portion of this project is approximately US$416,000 (NIS 1,500,000), of which the Israel Innovation Authority will finance 40 percent. According to the terms of the grant, Nano Dimension will pay royalties on future sales up to the full grant amount.

This unique project is being conducted in collaboration with Harris. The Harris portion of the project is sponsored by a grant from Space Florida. During this one-year project, both companies will optimise the designs of the 3D printing process and RF components and prepare a system for the flight studies at the ISS.

This project has been selected by the Centre for the Advancement of Science in Space, the manager of the ISS U.S. National Laboratory, to fly the space flight experiment on the ISS, using the team’s 3D printed materials and circuits. In this project, the companies will pioneer the first of a kind space flight experiment that will fly in space at low earth orbit for one year on the ISS, helping to understanding how 3D printed circuits, systems, and materials will endure in various space environments.

This project will demonstrate innovative methods for manufacturing new RF systems. Until now, manufacturing of RF systems has remained static for the last 30 years with each circuit in its own ‘gold box/boxes’ interconnected with cables and connectors. With 3D printing, the industry can explore a new manufacturing paradigm that eliminates manual labour and streamlines production. Another benefit to this technology is a reduction/elimination of wasted material, making it a ‘green’ process.

 

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Marshall Aerospace And Defence Using Stratasys Tech For 3D Printing Of Aircraft Parts

Marshall Aerospace and Defence Using Stratasys Tech For 3D Printing Of Aircraft Parts

Marshall Aerospace and Defence Group, one of the world’s largest privately owned and independent aerospace and defence companies, is now using advanced 3D printing from Stratasys to manufacture, flight-ready parts for several of its military, civil and business aircraft, while producing specific ground-running equipment at a lower cost than aluminium alternatives.

Marshall already has several pieces of 3D-printed ductwork flying on heavily modified aircraft, as well as holders for safety knives and switches for aircraft interiors. 3D printing flight-approved parts on demand enables the company to produce lighter parts than traditional methods, significantly faster and at lower cost.

According to Chris Botting, Materials, Processes and Additive Manufacturing Engineer at Marshall ADG, the ability to create accurate, repeatable and reliable 3D printed parts using aerospace-approved materials are key factors in achieving the performance requirements necessary for use within aircraft.

The company is using the Stratasys Fortus 450mc FDM Printer and ULTEM 9085 resin, a tough, yet lightweight 3D printing material with high thermal and chemical resistance. This has been crucial to overcoming the stringent requirements of the aerospace industry, as they can now 3D print parts with the desired flame, smoke and toxicity properties for use on aircraft interiors.

Marshall is also utilising its Fortus 450mc 3D printer to build final parts on the ground. Marshall recently created a ducting adapter prototype for vital ground-running equipment—essential for providing fresh air to cool the aircraft’s avionics. 3D printing this particular part helped Marshall transition from typically costly aluminium processes.

The group is also using Stratasys 3D printers for a range of complex tooling applications, including drill jigs, masking templates, bonded fixtures and composite mould tooling. The team regularly produces customised, low-volume production tools within just 24 hours of an engineer’s request. In fact, they are driving use of 3D-printed thermoplastic tools to replace heavy metal tools, reducing the burden on the operator, and crucially, reducing cost and lead times on urgent operational tasks.

Botting foresees the use of Stratasys FDM additive manufacturing to increase across all elements of the business and to drive new applications.

 

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Compact Industrial Metal Printer Market Outlook

Compact Industrial Metal Printer Market Outlook

Although still in its infancy, the ‘compact industrial’ metal printer market is poised to generate nearly US$112 million in revenue in 2019 and reach over US$1.05 billion by 2027, according to a new report by market analyst SmarTech Analysis.

This sub-segment of metal additive manufacturing hardware has a more accessible price-point, shorter learning curve, and compact footprint, while still offering industrial-level quality. Compact industrial metal printers address a significant hole in the marketplace and creates a lower-level entry point for new industrial users of metal 3D printing technology.

The growth of metal additive manufacturing as a whole will be aided directly and indirectly by the introduction and refinement of this growing class of metal 3D printers. Not only does the introduction of these new technologies give accessibility to a new group of customers, but they will greatly aid the education and further development of 3D printing as a manufacturing tool across industries and applications.

These compact industrial metal printing solutions give accessibility to an entirely new segment of the market. With a total system cost of less than US$200,000, and minimal set-up requirements, industrial customers now have an increasing number of options to aid in their exploration of metal additive manufacturing.

The most recognisable technologies in this market are the material extrusion technologies, specifically by Desktop Metal and Markforged, which are poised to grow dramatically. By borrowing heavily from materials science established within metal injection moulding (MIM), bound metal deposition techniques are experiencing a much higher adoption rate than earlier additive manufacturing technologies. It is within this subsegment that is seeing a lot of growth for the compact industrial metal printing market.

On the other hand, integration of directed energy deposition (DED) technologies with subtractive CNC machining tools has grown significantly in the last couple years and helped to establish a stronger link between the additive and subtractive digital manufacturing processes. Furthermore, continued improvements within powder bed fusion (PBF) technologies are being implemented in two ways: improved productivity and increased accessibility, with the latter driving the compact industrial metal printing market growth.

 

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Renault F1 Team Speeds Development Of 3D Printed Parts With Jabil

Renault F1 Team Speeds Development of 3D Printed Parts With Jabil

Jabil Inc. has inked an additive manufacturing agreement with Renault F1 Team to speed the development and delivery of 3D-printed racecar parts for the Renault R.S.19, competing in the 2019 Formula One World Championship.

Through the Jabil Additive Manufacturing Network, Renault F1 Team will gain fast and efficient access to top-quality parts.

An early adopter of additive manufacturing, Renault F1 Team continually seeks opportunities to produce racecar parts quickly and economically while reducing vehicle weight and without compromising part strength or integrity. “Every single aspect of what we do is geared towards excellence. We look forward to taking advantage of Jabil’s growing ecosystem of certified materials, processes and machines to boost parts availability and overall productivity,” said Antoine Magnan, head of partnerships, Renault Sport Racing.

Jabil Expands Additive Manufacturing Capabilities

Recent expansions to the Jabil Additive Manufacturing Network are designed to address the 3D printing needs of highly regulated industries. Additional 3D printing capacity has been added to Jabil’s Detroit-area manufacturing facility in Auburn Hills to support expanding automotive and healthcare applications. The ISO 13485-certified facility offers customers access to world-class machines for high-speed sintering, selective laser sintering and fused filament fabrication.

At Jabil’s AS9100 certified facility in Seattle, aerospace and defence customers will benefit from the company’s manufacturing rigor, supply chain orchestration and strict quality control processes. Jabil now has more than 200 3D printers at state-of-the-art facilities connected to the Jabil Additive Manufacturing Network, spanning sites in the United States, China, Hungary, Mexico, Singapore and Spain.

Expanded additive manufacturing capabilities are complemented by Jabil Engineered Materials, which are custom polymer formulations and compounds produced according to ISO 9001 Quality Management System standards. As part of its open-systems approach, Jabil works with the most advanced 3D printers, from industry leaders including Desktop Metal, EOS, Farsoon, HP and Ultimaker.

 

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ISF Incubator And NTU Launch 3D Printing Startup In Singapore

ISF Incubator And NTU Launch 3D Printing Startup In Singapore

ISF Incubator, the startup arm at Intellectual Ventures, has formed a joint venture with NTUitive called Secur3DP+, a startup company that brings additive manufacturing to global companies by providing a supply chain hub for 3D printing. NTUitive is the innovation and enterprise company of Singapore’s Nanyang Technological University (NTU).

Secur3DP+ acquired certain patents and patent applications related to 3D printing and embedded identifiers, and it has access to NTU’s expertise in 3D printing and blockchain. The startup makes additive manufacturing a viable option for more companies by creating a global 3D printing network that will connect companies with vetted service providers. Secur3DP+ also validates and authorizes all projects to ensure the right products are created and delivered in the most cost-effective way, and it enables startups and multinational corporations to protect and track their IP assets.

As 3D printing has evolved from a tool for rapid prototyping to being capable of creating production-ready parts, the design and manufacturing process has drastically changed. To achieve true distributed manufacturing, companies will need secure workflow solutions, like Secur3DP+, to protect their brand and intellectual property from counterfeiters.

Funded initially by a contribution of seed capital from ISF Incubator, Secur3DP+ will also leverage its partnership with NTU and the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Cluster (NAMIC) led by NTUitive to tap into the country’s thriving startup and 3D printing ecosystem.

ISF first partnered with NTU in 2016 through NAMIC to develop an embedded identifier module that allows 3D printers to mark unique physical identifiers within the structure of 3D printed metal products. This new joint venture expands on the previous partnership and gives ISF Incubator a global footprint as it focuses on building companies in Asia.

 

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3D Systems Helps Advance High-Performance Automotive Sector

3D Systems Helps Advance High-Performance Automotive Sector

Rodin Cars and Stewart-Haas Racing have been using 3D Systems’ 3D printing solutions to dramatically improve speed and performance in their cars. With the help of 3D Systems’ additive manufacturing solutions, Rodin Cars and Stewart-Haas Racing can rapidly create durable parts, including design and prototyping with faster iteration, and production, enabling quicker time to implementation, and lower total cost of operation.

Rodin Cars uses 3D Systems’ direct metal printing (DMP), selective laser sintering (SLS) and stereolithography (SLA) technologies to design, develop and build maximum-performance open-wheel cars for racetracks. It uses the sPro 230 for SLS production parts, the ProX 800 for SLA tooling for carbon fibre forms with 3D Systems’ Accura Bluestone material, and the ProX DMP 320 with 3DXpert for titanium production parts of exhaust collectors and mufflers, uprights and hubs, as well as a wide range of component mount brackets. As a result, Rodin Cars can quickly manufacture full-size prototypes as well as production components without the need for tooling. It is also able to advance complex design concepts and produce lighter weight metal parts not manufacturable in any other way.

Stewart-Haas Racing uses powerful 3D scanning with 3D Systems’ Geomagic Wrap reverse engineering software and the ProX 800 printer to produce aerodynamic components for race car component development and wind tunnel testing. For a NASCAR team, perfecting automotive components designed to increase speed and performance is a vital ingredient for success. Geomagic Wrap is used to collect scan data from the car components, process it, and create .stl files for shape deviation comparison. 3D Systems’ 3D Sprint software is used to prepare and optimise the CAD data and manage the additive manufacturing process on the ProX 800. Using 3D Systems’ Accura 25 material, Stewart-Haas Racing’s engineers are able to rapidly print large parts with a smooth surface finish and precise dimensional accuracy.

 

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Metal Powder Market Forecast To Grow At 3% CAGR Over 2018 To 2028

Metal Powder Market Forecast To Grow At 3% CAGR Over 2018 to 2028

The global metal powder market registered revenues of around US$4.3 billion in 2017, and is expected to expand at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of three percent from 2018 to 2028, according to a new report by Persistence Market Research. The market is estimated to create an incremental opportunity worth US$1.56 billion during the forecast period.

Mainly driving this trend is the significant growth of the automotive, aerospace, and manufacturing industries in developing and developed regions. In the automotive industry, in particular, 3D printing of lightweight material is gaining significant traction due to its beneficial properties such as high accuracy and more expected life, amongst others. These lightweight components play a crucial role in the design of automotive vehicle components, especially in electric cars, and help improve the performance of vehicles.

From a regional market standpoint, South Asia is seeing robust economic growth, resulting in the acceleration in demand for automotive, building and construction, and other end-use industries. The report notes that this is expected to see South Asia amongst the biggest market for metal powders in the foreseeable future.

 

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Turning Additive Manufacturing Into Business

Turning Additive Manufacturing Into Business

Additive manufacturing (AM), also referred to as 3D printing, is a collective name for several technologies through which an object is constructed layer by layer. The industrial materials that are currently printable range from polymers to metals, and the range of available materials is constantly expanding. Whereas AM was originally mostly used for prototyping, it is now more and more applied to end-products. Article by Saswitha de Kok and Corwin van Heteren, PricewaterhouseCoopers.

In some cases, additive manufacturing can be considered as a supplement to conventional production technologies. In other cases, it is the only means through which complex products can be fabricated or a solution to cost-effective upscaling of production capacity at low risk in order to serve new verticals, new geographies, and offer new products that need testing.

The technique offers several advantages that optimise and transform both products and processes, and may result in unprecedented and significant business value.

The generic advantages of additive manufacturing are:

  • Complexity is free; additive manufacturing offers complete design freedom which allows to design for the exact function of a product without constraints associated with conventional manufacturing.
  • Minimum batch size is one; the cost per part produced is equal and significantly less dependent on batch size.
  • Manufacturing when and wherever needed; production at or near point of use is possible.
  • Minimum material waste; as material is added, not subtracted, material is saved in production which allows for cost savings, especially in cases where material is a significant driver of component cost.

Although the general consensus is that these advantages offer great (potential) business value for both products and processes, there is a much divergence in visions of the type and depth of value that can be achieved. Therefore, we focused on assessing how much of this value is currently being unlocked by our discussion group. And how much potential do they see in the near future when the technology matures (becomes faster, more reliable and cheaper) and additive manufacturing systems and services improve?

Assessing Business Value Potential

In order to determine possibilities to add business value through additive manufacturing, it is essential to be aware of three basic underlying principles. These relate to the complexity of the product, advantages of scale when it comes to manufacturing, and the size of the object.

The technology offered by additive manufacturing makes it both possible and cost effective to produce complex shapes. This means the more complex the product or component, the more suitable additive manufacturing is, as opposed to conventional techniques.

The next underlying principle has to do with batch size. In general, the larger the series to be produced, the less suitable additive manufacturing is. Conventional manufacturing economics dictates that the larger the series, the lower the cost per unit. For additive manufacturing, each unit has the same cost.

Finally, additive manufacturing is in the current situation particularly suitable for producing smaller parts or products, which means businesses still have to turn to conventional technologies for larger parts.

The specific business values that are currently being achieved based on the principles mentioned above, are best categorised with respect to added value for processes as well as products. The more this added value applies to customer-end applications, the more we see the occurrence of competitive advantage, new business models and propositions.

Our consultation partners currently see the following pockets of value being created:

Business value for processes:

  • The time-to-market for new parts and products is reduced significantly. This boosts the speed of product innovation spectacularly.
  • Asset maintenance or maintenance of machines in the field becomes easier: spare parts and specialised tooling are always available on demand.
  • Assembly time and tooling costs are reduced if a product or part can be printed in one go, without requiring sub-assembly.

Business value for products:

  • Related to the last point , additive manufacturing makes it also possible to optimise the design by printing a product that previously consisted of sub-assemblies in one go. This significantly decreases error rates during the lifetime of a product, and increases the product lifecycle.
  • As the minimum production quantity is one unit, it is possible to offer (mass)- customisation. As a result, new verticals and geographical markets with specific needs can be opened up at low risk and low cost.
  • By means of rapid prototyping and rapid testing, design can efficiently be optimised and the ‘voice of the customer’ can be included in new product development.

Additive manufacturing opens up new business models and propositions. Our discussion partners indicated that they currently see the following business models emerging:

Co-Creation Platforms – AM opens up the possibility to co-create with customers. Co-creation can be introduced in virtually all stages of the lifecycle of a product. During the concept phase of a new product, the voice of the customer can easily be incorporated by testing small batches. It can also be applied to offer customisation of an existing design, or to prolong the lifetime value of a product by offering customised add-ons to the product.

Extreme Customisation – Combined with tools like measuring guides and scanning tools, companies are now able to mass produce custom-fit items in a cost-effective manner. As the performance of fitted products is generally much higher, customer value will greatly increase as well.

Although more and more home scanning tools are becoming available, it is important to note that for medical applications, such as prostheses and hearing aids, sophisticated professional devices are needed to achieve the high level of accuracy needed.

Lifecycle Management – Lifecycle management is one of the most prominent current applications of AM. Prolonging the lifecycle starts with the design phase of the product or part. Using the design possibilities offered by additive manufacturing, assembly might not be needed, which prolongs the lifecycle of a product and reduces errors.

Additive Manufacturing Service Propositions – The growth in AM adoption has resulted in the emergence of many new service propositions related to the supply of the technology as well as solutions within the entire associated process. AM requires many new capabilities that businesses have just started to build up, so there is a lot of space for service providers in this area.

Future Models

As the general maturity of additive manufacturing increases, the applicability of both a technological as an economical perspective increases as well. Our consultation partners indicated that they see potential; particularly as a result of the repeatability and accuracy of the technology, its increasing speed, the number of materials that can be used, multi-material print capabilities and the size of the printable surface. As soon as the speed of the hardware increases, the depreciation of the machine per printed part will be reduced and costs per product are lowered. This means that a larger portion of the product or part portfolio will be printable from an economic perspective.

 

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Kennametal Inks Beta Machine Partnership With ExOne

Kennametal Inks Beta Machine Partnership With ExOne

The ExOne Company has signed an initial X1 25PRO beta machine partnership with Kennametal Inc., a global provider of material science, tooling and wear-resistant solutions.

Unveiled at the RAPID + TCT event in Detroit, Michigan last week, the X1 25PRO is capable of printing metal, ceramic, and other advanced material parts directly. X1 25PRO can print standard industry powders utilised in MIM (metal injection moulding) and other PM (powdered metal) processes.

During the beta period, ExOne and Kennametal will have an opportunity to evaluate the new X1 25PRO machine and trial test new materials and processes. A multiple machine customer, Kennametal is on the cutting edge of binder jetting technology adoption for additive manufacturing.

“We see binder jetting technology as a key enabler for our differentiated, high-performance wear materials, such as tungsten carbide and Kennametal Stellite alloys,” said Sherri McCleary, director, Business Development Additive, Kennametal. “Kennametal is uniquely qualified to supply these additive materials and components, and we’re pleased to collaborate with ExOne on cutting-edge technology with the potential to help us advance from prototyping to serial production.”

“Working with innovative, global companies like Kennametal is another important step towards integrating industrial 3D printing into existing and new production lines. We are excited to bring Kennametal on as a beta user and look forward to beginning the testing programme,” said ExOne CEO John Hartner.

 

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