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Advancing MRO Solutions With Additive Manufacturing

Advancing MRO Solutions With Additive Manufacturing

ST Engineering and EOS have collaborated to introduce multiple AM solutions for the aerospace sector—from qualified systems and materials to 3D print certified parts that are more durable and more effective in operations.

ST Engineering’s Aerospace sector has been building its portfolio in virtual inventory to enhance customers’ air operation performance, including solutions for commonly damaged aircraft components. Printing on demand helps eliminate waste when platforms are retired, reducing non-moving inventory. In addition, with approved digital files and qualified 3D printers & processes, certified parts can be produced close to aircraft sites, vastly reducing delivery-related carbon emissions and improving cost efficiencies.

Confident that additive manufacturing (AM) is the way forward, the company collaborates with technology partners and like-minded airline customers to develop multiple AM solutions. Here, ST Engineering shares how they successfully broadened and deepened their capabilities for AM solutions. 

Overcoming Challenges

Back in 2018, ST Engineering already had plans to expand their AM capabilities from Filament Layer Manufacturing (FLM) technologies to include Laser Powder Bed (LPB) technologies- covering the two processes of Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) and Direct Metal Laser Solidification (DMLS) – so as to offer a wider range of additive manufacturing solutions to customers. 

Originally, it only had Design Organisation Approval (DOA) and Production Organisation Approval (POA) from the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) for FLM technology. For the LPB technologies, the plan was to build in-house capabilities in managing and qualifying the systems, materials and processes, which would in turn open more application potential to produce AM aircraft parts. 

As a new adopter of LPB AM technologies, ST Engineering decided to collaborate with EOS, one of the industry’s pioneering leaders specialising in LPB AM systems, to jumpstart their learning curve in understanding the possibilities and limitations of both SLS and DMLS processes.

AM Solution

By the end of 2018, ST Engineering and EOS’ consulting arm, Additive Minds, established an Additive Manufacturing Capability Transfer program. The program comprised customised training and consulting workshops that aimed to build strong fundamentals among attendees in the following topics: parts screening and selection, design for AM, business case analysis, and introduction on critical-to-quality requirements for AM processes.

After the Capability Transfer Program, ST Engineering selected a load-bearing cabin interior assembly with no impact on flight safety from their converted freighter aircraft as a benchmark to kickstart their adoption journey with both SLS and DMLS technologies. 

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Growing Possibilities Of 3D Printing In The Aerospace Industry

Growing Possibilities Of 3D Printing In The Aerospace Industry

Selective Laser Melting offers a wide range of possibilities in the 3D Printing of metal-based parts. Using a rocket engine, CellCore looks into the possibilities that SLM technology can offer for the aerospace industry. Article by SLM Solutions. 

Selective Laser Melting (SLM) offers a wide range of possibilities in the additive manufacturing of metal-based parts. Additive manufacturing allows metal parts to be created with internal structures allowing the part to be stronger and lighter than if it were produced through traditional manufacturing methods. A further advantage is in the integration of several components in one component. This functional integration and a low post-processing effort lead to considerable cost savings in the manufacturing process. 

Using a rocket engine, the company CellCore has demonstrated the advantages of selective laser melting and how it can be optimally utilised in the aerospace industry. Printed in a nickel-based superalloy, a monolithic component was created in collaboration with SLM Solutions. 

3D-printed Rocket Engine

The demonstrator manufactured by CellCore and SLM Solutions consists of a thrust chamber, the core element of a liquid-propellant engine with a combustion chamber wall, a fuel inlet, and an injection head with oxidant inlet. The chemical reaction in the combustion chamber creates a gas that expands due to heat development and is then ejected with enormous force. The thrust required to drive the rocket is therefore created using recoil. Extremely high temperatures are created in the chamber during the combustion process, so the wall must be cooled to prevent it from burning, too. To achieve this, the liquid fuel (e.g. kerosene or hydrogen) is fed upwards through cooling ducts in the combustion chamber wall before entering through the injection head. There, the fuel mixes with the oxidant and is lit by a spark plug. In conventional constructions, the cooling ducts are countersunk in a blank and subsequently sealed through multiple working steps. 

With selective laser melting, the cooling is integrated as part of the design and created together with the chamber in one process. Due to the engine‘s complexity, the traditional manufacturing process is cost-intensive, requiring half a year minimum. Additive manufacturing on the other hand, requires fewer than five working days to create an improved component.

Filigree Structural Cooling to Increase Efficiency

The single-piece rocket propulsion engine, combining the injector and thrust chamber, reduces numerous individual components into one, with multi-functional lightweight construction achievable only with the selective laser melting process. 

The internal structure developed by CellCore is the fundamental element of the engine and cannot be manufactured by traditional methods. It is not only suited to transport heat, but also improves the structural stability of the component. The cooling properties of the CellCore design considerably outperform conventional approaches, such as right-angled, concentrically running cooling ducts.

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Driving Hard On The Race Track: Wear-Resistant Iglidur Gears In The Gearbox

Driving Hard On The Race Track: Wear-Resistant iglidur Gears In The Gearbox

The iglidur I6 gears from the 3D printer for car racing of the “Youth Discovers Technology” (Jugend entdeckt Technik – JET) challenge

Electromobility is a crucial topic of the future. For Germany to be in the pole position, it is important to inspire young minds to take up scientific and engineering professions. Towards this purpose, the annual JET Challenge takes place at the IdeenExpo in Hanover. Students are given the task of building a fast, tough and energy-efficient racing car from a standard, remote-controlled car with a limited budget. Wear-resistant 3D-printed gears from igus made from the high-performance plastic iglidur I6 helped in this endeavour.

Build a fast, energy-saving racing car from an ordinary, remote-controlled car and overtake all other teams in a race – that’s the goal of the “Youth Discovers Technology” (Jugend entdeckt Technik – JET) Challenge, organised by the Society of German Engineers (Verein Deutscher Ingenieure – VDI) and the University of Hanover (Hochschule Hannover – HSH). As with the renowned models, the key factor is not speed alone, but also energy efficiency. In June 2019, visitors to the IdeenExpo can see the JET Challenge in action at the HSH trade fair stand. 25 teams compete for victory with their racing cars on a 1:10 scale on a 20-metre race track. The rules are strict. Available to each team is a budget of just 50 euros. Apart from battery, motor and speed controller, all components must be purchased, developed or built by yourself.

Save money with the igus 3D printing service

The teams are currently preparing for the next IdeenExpo. Students of the Eugen Reintjes vocational school are relying on a wear-resistant and tough gear transmission to enhance the performance of their race car. The biggest difficulty with this gearbox was the gear procurement. Due to the small budget, the students couldn’t afford big innovations. Finally, they found what they were looking for at the motion plastics specialist igus in Cologne: cost-effective, low-wear gears from the SLS printer. After a simple online configuration, the gears were printed and provided, made from the high-performance plastic iglidur I6.

High performance plastic makes race cars tough

Laboratory tests prove that the material I6 is significantly tougher than other plastics. In an experiment at our in-house test laboratory, the engineers tested gears made of polyoxymethylene (POM) and iglidur I6 at 12 revolutions per minute and loaded with 5Nm. A machined gear made of POM failed after 621,000 revolutions, while iglidur I6 was still in very good condition after one million revolutions. Thus, the team does not have to worry about potential failures. The gears in the racing car have already successfully completed an initial test run. The car is energy efficient and still reaches the top speed of 60km/h.

The young engineers support from igus promotes innovative projects

Innovative projects such as the race car gears for the JET Challenge are supported by igus as part of the young engineers support. The initiative supports young pupils, students and inventors in the development and execution of their technical projects. Further information on yes can be found at http://www.igus.sg/yes.

 

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3D Printing The Future Of E-Mobility Tools

3D Printing the Future of E-Mobility Tools

Kennametal’s 3D printed stator bore tool meets accuracy, roundness, and surface finish requirements of hybrid and electric vehicles.

Kennametal has developed a 3D printed stator bore tool specifically designed to meet growing customer demand for lighter weight tooling solutions used to machine components for hybrid and electric vehicles.

E-mobility components are typically machined on smaller, low horsepower CNC machining centres that require lighter weight tooling solutions. Kennametal’s 3D printed stator bore tool weighs half that of the conventionally manufactured version, while still meeting accuracy, roundness, and surface finish requirements for aluminium motor body boring.

“The main bore, which houses the stator of an electric motor measures approximately 250 mm in diameter (9.84 in) and approximately 400 mm (15.74 in) in length, with a smaller bearing bore at the bottom,” says Harald Bruetting, Manager, Program Engineering, at Kennametal. “When manufactured using conventional means, a reamer for this type of application would weigh more than 25 kg (55 lb), far too heavy for the existing machine tool or for an operator working with the tool.”

Bruetting and Kennametal’s Solution Engineering Group turned to the company’s in-house additive manufacturing capabilities to 3D-print a strong but lightweight indexable tool, equipped with proven Kennametal technologies including fine adjustable RIQ reaming inserts for high precision finishing and a KM4X adaptor for maximum rigidity. The tool also features internal 3D printed cooling channels that help maximize productivity and tool life.

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CADS Additive And Designairspace Launch First SaaS Solution

CADS Additive And Designairspace Launch First SaaS Solution

3D metal printing software firm CADS Additive and virtual workstation provider designairspace has partnered that will let customers benefit from a Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) approach to 3D printing. The collaboration means CADS Additive customers can now use CADS Additive’s data preparation software AM-Studio online, on any device with an internet connection. Instead of buying an expensive workstation and licenses, this partnership means companies, employees, and freelancers can ‘rent’ the CADS Additive software for 3D printing in the cloud. They can choose a monthly or yearly plan that fits any budget. Subscriptions range from $282 per month to $10,000 per year.

The market for 3D metal printing is growing rapidly as more companies discover innovative ways of deploying this technology. CADS Additive’s software makes it much easier for any metal workshop in the auto, aerospace, rail or medical sectors to benefit from metallic additive manufacturing. However, until now they would also need to invest in a high-spec physical computer (typically costing several thousand dollars) and purchase a yearly subscription to run the software in their offices.

The new partnership with designairspace will make it more affordable and more flexible for companies to begin 3D metal printing. designairspace provides the underlying platform that is fine-tuned for the requirements of additive manufacturing software like from CADS Additive. A customer simply connects over the internet using any desktop, laptop or even tablet, and can begin using high-powered machines running CADS Additive from anywhere in the world.

The two companies will provide this solution as a service tailored to different budgets. If a customer only needs to use CADS Additive’s software for a few hours each month, the flexible fees mean they can find the right solution for their requirements. But if they need extensive access for multiple users, more comprehensive subscriptions are available. The subscription model makes 3D printing potentially more affordable than buying traditional licenses and installing it on local workstations.

“The cooperation with designairspace opens completely new ways for data preparation of metallic additive manufacturing. Providing our high-performance software in the cloud is a breakthrough milestone for 3D printing. We are proud to be part of this step towards the future of software deployment,” said Daniel Plos, Sales Director at CADS Additive GmbH.

A designairspace spokesperson added: “We partner with Independent Software Vendors of 3D printing, CAD, CAM and BIM to market and run their software as a pure SaaS model. Our mission is to be the world’s leading, born-in-the-cloud CAD and BIM reseller, making any CAD and BIM software available and affordable for anyone on the planet. We’re excited and honoured that CADS Additive has selected us for their SaaS journey”.

To try CADS Additive over the internet, please visit https://cads-additive.ondesignair.space/

Besides that, CADS Additive offers their software solutions AM-Studio and AM-Studio for Creo for traditional purchasing on yearly plans. CADS Additive is currently expanding its reseller network worldwide. Since start of 2021 CADS Additive has been working hand in hand with Aichi Sangyo as first reseller in Asia Region. Aichi Sangyo sells amongst other SLM Solutions machines in Japan and is responsible for our mutual customer HONDA Motorsports in Japan.

If you also want to become part of the CADS Additive reseller network visit the website https://www.cads-additive.com/en/become-reseller/ or contact CADS Additive via [email protected]

 

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The 3D Printing Market Will Reach $51 Billion In 2030

The 3D Printing Market Will Reach $51 Billion In 2030

3D printing has the potential to significantly disrupt traditional manufacturing, as it is increasingly being used beyond prototypes, moulds, tools, or other one-off parts. The total 3D printing market will reach $51 billion in 2030, driven mainly by growth in production parts, according to new data from Lux Research.

Lux’s new report, “Will 3D Printing Replace Conventional Manufacturing?” highlights the 3D printing market size and growth by application and material, provides an outlook on what 3D printing means for the future of manufacturing, and discusses how strategies and business models will evolve as well.

“3D printing will be a key in the future manufacturing landscape thanks to benefits that it can bring over injection moulding, machining, casting, or other conventional methods,” explains Anthony Schiavo, Research Director at Lux Research and one of the lead authors of the report. “These benefits include customisation and personalisation, the ability to create complex geometries, part consolidation, and in some cases lowering costs.”

The value of 3D-printed parts will rise at a 15 percent compound annual growth rate (CAGR) over the next decade, from $12 billion in 2020 to $51 billion in 2030. “The largest share of this growth will be in end-use parts, which are just 23 percent of the market today but will reach 38 percent share in 2030,” notes Schiavo.

“The medical and dental industries will account for the largest share of end-use parts, reaching $4.5 billion in 2030, followed by aerospace at $3.9 billion.”

As 3D printing for manufacturing matures, strategies will shift. Vertical integration is critical today, but horizontal specialists can capture more profits in the future. Due to the relative immaturity of 3D printing as a manufacturing technology, complete well-integrated ecosystems are needed to help make it competitive.

 

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TRUMPF Unveils New New 3D Printer To Help Fabricators Move Into Mass Production

TRUMPF Unveils New New 3D printer To Help Fabricators Move Into Mass Production

TRUMPF has unveiled the new series of its TruPrint 3000 3D printing system at a virtual customer event. The medium-format machine uses powder-bed-based laser melting to produce parts with a diameter of up to 300 millimeters and a height of up to 400 millimeters. It can handle all weldable materials including steels, nickel-based alloys, titanium and aluminum.

“We’ve improved key aspects of the TruPrint 3000 to tailor it even more closely to the quality requirements, certifications and production processes of various industries,” says Klaus Parey, managing director of TRUMPF Additive Manufacturing.

The new TruPrint 3000 can be equipped with a second laser that almost doubles its productivity. “The multilaser option significantly reduces part costs – that’s how we help our customers make the move into mass production,” says Parey.

Two 500-watt lasers scan the machine’s entire build chamber in parallel. This makes production much faster and more efficient regardless of the number and geometries of the parts. With the Automatic Multilaser Alignment option, the system can automatically monitor the multilaser scan fields during the build stage and calibrate them to each other. With each laser scanning a contour, the process does not lead to any kind of weld seams. This is what allows multilaser parts to meet such outstanding quality standards.

The TRUMPF experts have transformed the movement of inert gas through the TruPrint 3000. The way in which it flows through the machine from back to front is now even steadier and more uniform. As well as boosting the quality of printed parts, this also allows the operator to remove excess powder from the part while it is still inside the machine. Previous models required the operator to take the part out and remove the powder at a separate station. The new machine is designed to process the powder in a shielded environment, using an inert gas to prevent the powder from becoming contaminated during the build. This is a major advantage for sensitive industries such as medical device manufacturing.

 

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A.I. Engineering Pioneer Hyperganic Raises $7.8m Funding For R&D Expansion In Singapore

A.I. Engineering Pioneer Hyperganic Raises $7.8m Funding For R&D Expansion In Singapore

Hyperganic has announced the closing of $7.8m in funding, with a focus on significantly expanding their presence in Singapore. The round is led by German funds HV Capital and VSquared Ventures. Co-investors are US-based tech fund Converge, industrial partner Swarovski and PC pioneer Hermann Hauser, co-founder of ARM.

Hyperganic was founded in 2017 to radically accelerate innovation in design, engineering and production of physical objects. The company drives a paradigm shift, where complex products are created by computer algorithms and Artificial Intelligence. The resulting objects are traded digitally and manufactured in digital factories based on industrial 3D printing (Additive Manufacturing).

The investment will drive a significant expansion of the existing Hyperganic team and the establishment of R&D centers in both Singapore and China.

“Humanity’s biggest challenges can only be solved through a giant leap in technology. We’ve created Hyperganic to fundamentally change how we design and build the things around us. Now we are ready to shift gears. We are happy to have the support of such a diverse team of investors on this exciting journey,” said Lin Kayser, co-founder and CEO, Hyperganic.

Hyperganic will use Singapore as a key pillar of the company’s development strategy. This decision was driven by the country’s investment in a vibrant deep technology ecosystem, specifically for advanced manufacturing technologies such as A.I., robotics and industrial 3D printing. As part of Singapore’s five-year RIE (Research, Innovation, Enterprise) plans, NAMIC, the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Cluster, was incepted to orchestrate and implement strategies for the future of production.

“Singapore is one of only a few countries which have recognised the seismic shift happening through digital factories based on Additive Manufacturing. The products designed by our Singapore A.I. engineers will be game changers for many industries that are highly relevant to the region. With NAMIC, Singapore has a unique organisation that demonstrates the country’s strategic commitment to transforming an entire industry sector,” said Kayser.

“We have engaged Hyperganic as early as 2018 when it was in stealth mode, after Lin and I met at a conference. Back then, it was extraordinary to me what the company had envisaged — a paradigm shift in the way people design, using algorithms to create functional products with biomimicry designs. We are delighted to be partnering with Hyperganic on their growth journey, and excited by its plans to rapidly expand its footprint in Singapore and Asia,” said Dr. Chaw Sing Ho, Director, NAMIC Singapore.

 

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Safran And SLM Solutions Evaluate SLM Technology For Additively Manufactured Main Fitting Of A Bizjet

Safran And SLM Solutions Evaluate SLM technology For Additively Manufactured Main Fitting Of A Bizjet

In a joint project, Safran Landing Systems and SLM Solutions tested Selective Laser Melting to produce a component of a nose landing gear for a bizjet. A world first for a part of this size.

The joint objective of the project is to demonstrate the feasibility to produce a main fitting by Selective Laser Melting process. The component was therefore redesigned for metal-based additive manufacturing allowing time saving in the whole process, and significant weight reduction about 15 percent of the component.

Due to the stringent requirements of this component, which is one of the parts that transfers the loads from the wheel to the aircraft structure and is retracted after take-off, Safran selected the titanium alloy, as it is a material with high mechanical properties, naturally resistant to corrosion, which does not require any surface treatment. Additionally, it helps increasing part durability.

Thierry Berenger, Additive Manufacturing project leader at Safran Landing Systems says: “We chose SLM Solutions as a partner, because of their expertise and the SLM 800 machine, which exactly meets our requirements in terms of machine size and reliability.”

With a vertically extended build envelope, the SLM 800 is perfectly adapted to produce large components. The machine is equipped with SLM Solutions’ proven quad-laser technology and innovative features, like the patented gas flow and a permanent filter, that ensure highest reliability.

One of the strengths of the SLM technology is its flexibility. Design changes can be quickly modified, printed and tested, then less time is spent during the prototype development.

Gerhard Bierleutgeb, EVP Global Services & Solutions at SLM Solutions explains: “Additive manufacturing contributes to save time in the qualification and certification phases by rapidly providing the parts for testing. We were able to produce the main fitting in few days on the SLM 800, vs few months with the forging process.”

Part Information:

  • Measurements: 455x295x805 mm
  • Material: Titanium
  • Machine: SLM 800

This new design invented by Safran Landing Systems, meeting ambitious resistance and mass reduction objectives, is patented.

 

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Unlocking New Additive Applications In Asia With Chemical Vapor Smoothing

Unlocking New Additive Applications In Asia With Chemical Vapor Smoothing

Additive3D Asia in collaboration with Additive Manufacturing Technologies (AMT), jointly hosted their first webinar for the Asia Pacific region entitled “Unlocking New Additive Applications in Asia with Chemical Vapor Smoothing”.  Speaking at the session were Mr. Jason Joo, Co-Founder of Additive3D Asia and Mr. Joseph Crabtree, CEO and Founder of AMT.

The webinar addressed the current key challenges of 3D printing and the quality issues of 3D printed parts. AMT gave a deeper insight with actual case studies and demonstrated how AMT’s PostPro Chemical Vapor Smoothing patented technology can benefit users. This includes better strength, surface finishing, smoothness, and watertightness to the 3D printed part close like from injection moulding process.

To deliver a better 3D printing experience, Additive3D Asia who is AMT’s authorised PostPro Production Partner offers the Post Processing treatment as a Service to all customers in Singapore and across the APAC region.

Suitable for all Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM), Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) and HP MultiJet Fusion (MJF) and other Powder Bed Fusion (PBF) technology, the Chemical Vapor Smoothing can now process up to 95 percent of the different 3D printing materials available in the open market. Varies industries from Aerospace, Automotive, Medical, Consumer Products, Lifestyles, Industrial and others will be able to experience up to 200 percent of return to their business by switching to this new post processing technology.

“Collaborating with Additive3D Asia is another example of AMT’s commitment to unlock the full potential of additive manufacturing across the globe. We are delighted to have Additive3D Asia as our first official production partner in Singapore and look forward to supporting their business growth and open up new opportunities for high-quality, customised applications,” commented Mr. Joseph Crabtree

To watch the recording of the webinar, visit: https://additive3dasia.com/vapor-smoothing/contact-webinar-recording/

 

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