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Additive Manufacturing Standards For Medical Production

Additive Manufacturing Standards For Medical Production

Dedicated standards for medical devices produced using Additive Manufacturing are already in preparation. Gregor Reischle, Head of Additive Manufacturing at TÜV SÜD highlights the importance of additive manufacturing standards for medical devices and what manufacturers need to consider before they start. 

Gregor Reischle

Dedicated standards for medical devices produced using Additive Manufacturing are already in preparation. In future, they will smooth the path for the implementation of new technologies as well as their assessment for approval. In this interview with Asia Pacific Metalworking Equipment News (APMEN), Gregor Reischle, Head of Additive Manufacturing at testing, inspection and certification services provider TÜV SÜD, shares what aspects need to be considered against this backdrop.

Why do we need standards to help us use AM technology for medical production?

Gregor Reischle (GR): Items that are already produced using Additive Manufacturing, such as protective face coverings, masks and visors or products for radiation treatment, are subject to particularly rigorous conformity and safety standards. However, assessment procedures for approval of these products take time – and time is of the essence in a pandemic. Standards help to ensure regulatory requirements are implemented reliably, promptly and cost-effectively, thus minimising risks. They also represent state-of-the-art solutions and serve to concentrate specific knowledge.

There are still no Additive Manufacturing standards designed specifically for medical devices. Where can manufacturers seek guidance in the meantime?

GR: We have drawn up checklists for all the most important requirements in the main standards and regulations relating to Additive Manufacturing, covering those that set out more general terms as well as the first more specific requirements. We are currently providing the checklists free of charge International standard organisations such as ASTM International and ISO are likewise providing access to relevant standards free of charge at the moment, for items such as personal protective equipment and medical devices. This benefits testing laboratories, healthcare specialists and the general public.

How widespread are 3D-printed medical devices?

GR: Conventionally manufactured products still make up the majority. Anyone using 3D printing today is pursuing strategic aims and is willing to invest a lot of time in such products. Additive manufacturing is only widespread in specific areas of medical engineering, like prosthetics and dental technology. In fact, probably all the major manufacturers in the dental industry now supply 3D printers, some of which can even be used in medical practices. 

What changes will the MDR introduce in this respect compared to its predecessor, the MDD?

GR: Under the Medical Device Directive (MDD), these “custom-made products” can be used without the need for CE marking. Although the same will apply under the Medical Device Regulation (MDR), manufacturers of class III implantable custom products will now need to call in a Notified Body to perform conformity assessment of their quality management system. Many products will fall into a higher class under the MDR, and this may require the involvement of a Notified Body in some cases. Custom-made products will be replaced by a common basic model which is customised for patient-specific use.

How will upcoming standards support the requirements to fulfil regulatory requirements such as MDR conformity? And which existing standards could already be useful?

GR: The requirements of the MDR state that a Notified Body must assess the manufacturer’s quality management system and verify compliance of its processes with the state of the art. DIN SPEC 17071—the specification for requirements concerning quality-assured processes at additive manufacturing centres—can usefully be applied here. The guideline is aimed at minimising risks stemming from parts and components produced using Additive Manufacturing, irrespective of the industry or sector. A project to transfer these findings to medical engineering is already under way, and a white paper on the subject will be published very soon. The DIN SPEC 17071 will also be advanced to reach the international ISO/ASTM level; the upcoming ISO 52920 and 52930 represent state-of-the-art quality assurance for AM production.

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Optisys Uses SLM Technology To Manufacture Parts For Space Missions

Optisys Uses SLM Technology To Manufacture Parts For Space Missions

Optisys is a revolutionary RF product development and manufacture company with a unique approach to creating highly integrated products, enabled by metal additive manufacturing. Its well-known customers rely on its broad spectrum of solutions, which includes feeds, slotted flat panels and phased arrays for antenna and radar applications used everywhere from sea to outer space.

With the SLM 500, the company now owns a high-tech metal additive manufacturing system; excellent for producing high-strength metal components. Janos Opra, Optisys CEO, explains: “We are a company that wouldn’t exist without additive manufacturing. The SLM 500 gives us exactly what we need, for example, to manufacture antennas used on space missions.” To do this, the components produced must be able to withstand the harsh conditions of the entire range of space environments from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to deep space probes. Opra explains: “The atomic oxygen in the atmosphere virtually sandblasts the parts. They also must withstand high heat loads, and extreme temperature cycling, on other planets. The SLM parts are not only lightweight, but they can also manage harsh conditions and are particularly robust with excellent performance.”

Compared to conventional manufacturing methods, SLM technology can produce lightweight components by integrating internal hollow structures while maintaining a consistently high component quality. Even small reductions in weight, through component integration, can lead to enormous cost advantages through a reduction in launch costs; which are priced per kg and are a major cost driver for space companies. Due to these unique advantages and the pressure to keep costs to a minimum, conventional manufacturing methods are hardly an option for major players in the space industry.

“Additive manufacturing technology ensures we can create the lightest, strongest and best performing RF products available,” continued Opra. “By coupling large aspects of the RF system into single components or repeatable tiles, our customers can reduce weight enormously over competing suppliers. This is of prime importance for many players in the ‘New Space’ market particularly.”

The SLM 500 is a multi-laser system with up to four 700W lasers working simultaneously. It features closed powder handling with automated powder sieving and supply during the build process without any powder contact. The ability to change the build cylinder minimises machine downtime, maximises productivity and reduces cost per part. Due to a smart assembly in the build envelope, Optisys produces several individual components in one build process with the SLM 500 – something that is particularly efficient and not possible with conventional manufacturing methods.

Sam O’Leary, CEO of SLM Solutions, emphasises: “We are proud that metal-based additive manufacturing is making such an important contribution to space missions. This deployment demonstrates how robust the parts produced with SLM technology are. Innovative, top-tier companies such as Optisys continue to drive additive manufacturing forward and bring it to other planets. It makes us proud to enable their success.”

 

 

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CNC Machining & 3D Printing: A Mixed Approach To Precision Manufacturing

CNC Machining & 3D Printing: A Mixed Approach To Precision Manufacturing

Peter Jacobs, Senior Director of Marketing at CNC Masters shares how a meaningful combination of CNC machining and 3D Printing can help manufacture even the most intricate parts and boost overall productivity.

The advancing 3D printing capabilities have made it convenient for manufacturers to use additive manufacturing to develop parts from a wide variety of materials. These materials include polymers such as ABS, PLA, TPE, and carbon fibre composites, polycarbonates, and nylon.

Alongside 3D printing, precision CNC machining also enjoys a crucial role in the additive manufacturing process, with a new process called hybrid manufacturing quickly assuming its hold in the industry.

Combining CNC machining and 3D printing can meet all crucial design requirements and eliminate limitations in these individual domains. 

Benefits of Combining Machining and 3D Printing

Here’s why the combination of CNC machining and 3D printing is relevant and the benefits that will follow:

  • Conservation of Time

The process of 3D printing a part and then having it delivered to the next section for CNC machining involves too many steps; however, this process is relatively less time-consuming relative to injection moulding.

In Injection moulding, the design and development of a specialised tool must go through every workpiece in the moulding process, making it more time-consuming.

While we can alternatively use 3D printed injection moulds to reduce production time, incorporating the potential of CNC machining can be more fruitful.

We can seamlessly tweak the digital files that end up getting 3D printed as prototypes rather than making alterations to an existing injection moulding machine tool.

  • Higher Tolerance Rate

3D printing has encountered hindrances in its progress due to the tolerances of modern 3D printers. Many end-use parts have specific tolerances and other vital requirements that are only feasible by incumbent manufacturing methods.

Unlike 3D printing, CNC machining is consistent. It offers a more refined product because its equipment does not exhibit sensitivity to heat as a 3D printer, which might warp and distort the product and result in uncertain runs of products.

Merging the two domains provides us with the perks of rapid prototyping brought to the table by 3D printers. It also enables us to dial in the tolerance from 0.1 mm to 0.3 mm as anticipated from a DMLS or SLS 3D printer to about 0.025 to 0.125 mm rendered by CNC Milling Machines.

  • Use a Bigger Workpiece

A congregation of these two domains involves 3D printing a part and then forwarding it to CNC milling to balance the final tolerances and providing it with the desired finish.

There has been excitements about merging these two technologies into one machine. This scenario could result in something that resembles the industrial-scale hybrid milling machines.

Such machines are speculated to harbour a build volume of about 40 feet in diameter and 10 feet in height. These hybrid 3D printing-milling machines can mill the surface of a new 3D print while the operation would still be underway.

With state-of-the-art CNC Benchtop Milling Machines, you can enjoy peak performance while occupying a minimum floor.

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Integrating 3D Printing In Orthopaedic Implants Manufacturing

Integrating 3D Printing In Orthopaedic Implants Manufacturing

Matt Smith, New Technologies and Process Engineer at Corin Group shares how the company has integrated 3D printing into its orthopaedic implants production. Article by Markforged. 

The human body is all different shapes and sizes so for companies who specialise in making implants, streamlining the process for handling variants is important. 

Being involved in implementing new technology and creating new processes at the same time is an exciting role for any engineer. Ask Matt Smith, New Technologies and Process Engineer at Corin Group—an orthopaedic medical device manufacturer in the UK, who is well underway with his additive manufacturing programme. Matt began his project in early 2020 with a printer justification based on several new product introductions. 

Manufacturing Challenges

Matt and the team set about the task of introducing a new ‘stem’ and ‘femur’ and decided to see what new technology was available to help them do it in a timely manner. Each time a new product is introduced to manufacturing there are a large number of associated fixtures that come with it. Being able to make these in house was a clear benefit and offered some very reasonable cost savings, so it was the obvious place to start. 

“We decided that we needed to look at additive as a means of helping us be more agile when introducing new products. We believed there were many areas where we’d benefit, however as we progressed with the project, and more colleagues got involved, we began to realise the huge potential we had,” said Matt.

As the project was getting underway the world fell victim to the COVID-19 pandemic and almost overnight facilities closed, including many of the supply chain at Corin Group. Matt and the team were faced with the almost impossible task of ensuring their new project was still delivered on time, whilst having to work with no raw materials, no sub-contract manufacturing and limited internal resources. As they sat and mused over the creation of all the machining and inspection fixtures required, for the 48 variants of their new stem, and 24 variants of femur they quickly identified a new challenge, their raw material deliveries of forgings and castings would also be delayed. Without the raw material it would be impossible to even test the developed fixturing. 

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Desktop Metal And Uniformity Labs Announce Breakthrough In Aluminium Sintering For Binder Jetting Technology

Desktop Metal And Uniformity Labs Announce Breakthrough In Aluminium Sintering For Binder Jetting Technology

Desktop Metal, Inc. (NYSE: DM), a leader in mass production and turnkey additive manufacturing (AM) solutions, and Uniformity Labs, a leading additive manufacturing company that is revolutionising industrial 3D printing materials and processes, has announced a breakthrough powder that enables aluminium sintering for binder jetting AM technology. This new powder is the result of a multi-year collaboration between the companies to develop a low-cost, raw material yielding fully dense, sinterable 6061 aluminium with greater than ten percent (10 percent) elongation and improved yield strength (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) versus wrought 6061 aluminium with comparable heat treatment.

“This breakthrough represents a major milestone in the development of aluminium for binder jetting and a significant step forward for the AM industry as it is one of the most sought-after materials for use in automotive, aerospace and consumer electronics,” said Ric Fulop, CEO and co-founder of Desktop Metal. “The global aluminium castings market is more than $50 billion per year, and it is ripe for disruption with binder jetting AM solutions. These are the best reported properties we are aware of for a sintered 6061 aluminium powder, and we are excited to make this material available exclusively to Desktop Metal customers as part of our ongoing partnership with Uniformity Labs.”

“The introduction of lightweight metals to binder jetting opens the door to a wide variety of thermal and structural applications across industries,” said Adam Hopkins, founder and CEO of Uniformity Labs. “This innovation is a key step towards the adoption of mass-produced printed aluminium parts.”

This new powder enables the sintering of unadulterated 6061 aluminium and represents a significant improvement over prior techniques used to sinter aluminium, which required coating powder particles, mixing sintering aids into powder, using binders containing expensive nanoparticles, or adding metals such as lead, tin and magnesium. Critically, the powder also enables compatibility with water-based binders and has a higher minimum ignition energy (MIE) relative to other commercially available 6061 aluminium powders, resulting in an improved safety profile.

Desktop Metal and Uniformity Labs plan to continue to work together over the coming year to qualify the powder and scale production for commercial release. Once fully qualified, Uniformity 6061 aluminium will be available for use with the Desktop Metal Production System platform, which is the only metal binder jetting solution with an inert, chemically inactive processing environment across the printer and auxiliary powder processing equipment, enabling customers to achieve consistent, high-quality material properties across volumes of end-use parts with reactive materials, such as aluminium.

 

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How 3D Printing Is Transforming The Medical Industry

How 3D Printing Is Transforming The Medical Industry

3D printing is transforming the medical industry in many ways, but more importantly, it’s helping improve patient outcomes, improve economics and provide new opportunities for learning. Asia Pacific Metalworking Equipment News (APMEN) spoke to Mitchell Beness, Head of HP 3D Print GTM APJ on the impact of 3D printing and its outlook in Southeast Asia.

How is additive manufacturing transforming the medical industry?

Mitchell Beness (MD): Whether it’s to produce anatomical models, medical instruments and equipment or personalised medical aids such as orthotics and prosthetics, 3D printing has helped improve patient comfort and outcomes. 

Today, advanced 3D printing capabilities provide essential equipment and key insights to help educate and prepare care givers as well as patients. For example, HP Metal Jet technology enables production of high-quality surgical tools such as surgical scissors and endoscopic surgical jaws, and new applications and geometries not possible with conventional metal fabrication technologies. In addition, HP Multi Jet Fusion can provide doctors and surgeons with rich, detailed models, which makes it easier for doctors to differentiate tiny details such as veins and arteries when practicing the procedures as well as countless other medical, health and wellness applications.

In prosthetics and orthotics, 3D printing has helped both patients and businesses improve patient outcomes by producing complex, custom designs. 

The impact of 3D printing can also be seen in the recent COVID-19 pandemic, where global supply chains were upended like never before – hospitals were facing a lack of critical life-or death resources. For many, 3D printing was brought to their lives for the first time – with many of their introduction to 3D printing was via personal protective equipment (PPE) or testing equipment, like face shields or nasal swabs. 

3D printing is transforming the medical industry in many ways, but more importantly, it’s helping improve patient outcomes, improve economics and provide new opportunities for learning. 

What are the benefits of 3D printing in the medical industry?

MD: Advances in the 3D printing industry have enabled the industry to make any idea, large or small, simple or complex a reality. HP’s 3D printing solutions enable innovative designs and the production of high quality, cost effective personalised products.

We collaborate with various partners and customers to produce strong high-quality parts that are production ready. HP’s advanced industrial capabilities enable customers to reliably move designs from prototype to mass production. The COVID-19 response was a clear example on how the community came together from prototyping to quickly deploying solutions to first responders on the ground with face shields, masks, testing swabs and more. We also work with industry leaders such as Everex, an engineering company that creates unique and technologically advanced products for the needs of their customers in the medical industry. With the HP Multi Jet Fusion technology, Everex wanted to design a new type of instrument from their device, Hemo One that is used to analyse samples of blood. The Hemo One was previously produced using traditional methods but Everex wanted a design that would be easier to assemble with an eye on reducing cost. 

How has additive manufacturing helped in the fight against the pandemic? What are some innovations?

MD: Additive Manufacturing has definitely played its role in the fight against the pandemic, especially in helping plug the gaps in supply chain for personal protective equipment. At the start of the pandemic, HP mobilised a global effort to design and manufacture products that could be 3D printed to support frontliners and healthcare workers. We started working with employees across the company as well as customers to start sourcing designs and print parts that will help with COVID-19 efforts. 

As of May last year, HP together with our partners and clients has printed and shipped over 5 million 3D-printed parts for ventilators, Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) respirators, face shields, masks and other personal accessories. Together with our partners, we’ve also made these 3D printable designs freely available to the community.

All in all, the industry has definitely stepped up to meet the demands of the pandemic through continuous knowledge sharing, plugging the supply chain gap, and working with government agencies and health experts in determining parts most in need. 

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Why Open-source 3D Printing Is The New Norm

Why Open-source 3D Printing Is The New Norm

Open systems are the future. The open concept will enable the pioneering of new applications and solutions in the aerospace industry and more. Article by MahaChem. 

For decades, most 3D printers adopt a closed system—where the user is restricted to the manufacturer’s resins. Economically, this means that chances are, the material is costlier as the manufacturer has the bargaining power over the user, who is restricted to their material offerings. For the same reason, it could also mean that users are unable to create something that is eco-friendly, unless the material is certified to be so. 

But most importantly, this limits the creativity of the individual to come up with a product with the best design paired with the ideal material. Of course, closed source printers aren’t all that bad, they ensure that the quality of the end product is up to standard, by ensuring that their materials are of quality.

However, with the invention of the open-source 3D printing technology, the woes of product designers have been resolved. The designer now has the power to choose any material from any supplier based on their personal preferences. Want a cheaper material? Find an economical supplier. Want an environmentally friendly product? Find a supplier with green or eco-friendly resins or filament. Want a malleable product? Find a soft polymer supplier. 

All in all, this means that designers are free to create whatever they have in their imagination. This has become a new norm over the years as more and more designers search for alternatives from closed-source printers to bring their imagination to life. As such, over the years there has been a surge in open-sourced 3D printers, particularly desktop ones, to meet the needs of the users.

Why is it Important for the Aerospace Industry?

3D printing has become especially important in the aerospace industry to address challenges like production time, cost of production and carbon emission. For example, it can produce lighter parts while maintaining strength, which reduces the aircraft’s overall weight, hence lowering its fuel consumption. This in turn, cuts operational costs and lowers carbon dioxide emission. Here are other benefits of 3D printing for the aerospace industry: 

Precision 

Surface finishing is critical in the aerospace industry. 3D printing parts can be post-processed to a very high precision. Technologies like Material Jetting are able to produce parts with smooth, injection moulding like surface finishing with little post processing needed. While Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is able to produce high performance metal parts. 

Materials That Are Licensed 

Currently, there are many qualified materials used in producing parts in the aerospace industries, depending on the technology. In SLM, Aluminium or Titanium are mainly used. Examples of parts printing with SLM are the suspension wishbone and the Jet engine. While in Selective Laser Sintering (SLS), Nylon is the preferred material. Examples of parts printed with SLS include Air flow ducting and Tarmac nozzle bezel. Other technologies include Stereolithography (SLA) and Material Jetting, which uses Resin to produce parts such as Entry doors, brackets, and door handles.

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4K For 3D: Igus Offers Multi-Material Printing For Multifunctional Components

4K For 3D: igus Offers Multi-Material Printing For Multifunctional Components

The motion plastics specialist continues to expand its 3D printing capacities for durable, wear-resistant and complex components

If a component is to have several properties, it usually has to be manufactured in several steps. But such production can quickly become cost-intensive for small quantities. It is precisely for this reason that igus now offers multi-material printing with up to four materials. This allows multifunctional and wear-resistant special parts to be manufactured quickly and cost-effectively in just one step. To this end, igus has further expanded its 3D printing capacities and its range of materials for the FDM process.

3D printing of individual wear-resistant parts with different materials offers the user great design possibilities. At the same time, multifunctional components significantly reduce the manufacturing process. Therefore, igus has been offering the production of durable special parts in multi-material printing with two materials since last year. In this way, wear-resistant but at the same time resilient components, as well as intelligent special parts, can be produced. This service has now been expanded by motion plastics. igus can now use up to four materials in a single process to manufacture multifunctional components. “For this purpose, we have expanded our 3D printing production and now also offer new materials that can be processed specifically in multi-material printing”, explains Tom Krause, Head of Additive Manufacturing at igus GmbH. “For example, we can produce parts for equipment, tool or special machine construction cost-effectively with no minimum order quantity in just a few days.”

Multi-material printing for bearings with the best specifications

The igus materials for multi-material printing have different specifications. The iglidur tribo-filament makes components low-friction, maintenance-free and up to 50 times more abrasion-resistant than regular 3D printing materials. With iglidur I160-EL, igus is now offering a new elastic material that can be printed in the individual bearing, as a seal, for example. igumid P150, on the other hand, is the new 3D printing filament for multi-material printing, which ensures high strength (87 MPa flexural strength) of the component. Especially for the additive manufacturing of intelligent components with integrated sensors, igus offers two further smart materials: sigumid P and sigumid F. The latter is printed onto the bearing and sends a signal via a normally closed contact when the wear limit is reached. By contrast, sigumid P is used to alert of an overload in the bearing. This is because when pressure is applied to the bearing, the shape changes and so does the resistance. “4K printing now makes it possible to combine all the specifications of the different materials – wear-resistant, strong, elastic and intelligent – in one complex component”, Tom Krause sums up.

 

More information on multi-material printing can be found at:

https://www.igus.eu/info/multiple-component-3d-printing?L=en

 

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Separating Additively Manufactured Aerospace Parts

Separating Additively Manufactured Aerospace Parts

Here’s how Ohnhäuser GmbH is using BEHRINGER GmbH’s 3D bandsaw to accurately separate additively manufactured aerospace parts from the printing plate. 

Additive manufacturing of parts continues to gain a foothold, particularly in applications where typical production techniques reach their limits. One of the clear advantages of 3D printing technology is the seemingly limitless shapes and structures of the creations. Even a moving group of parts can be printed as a complete unit, so there is no need for post-production assembly.

In the last year, BEHRINGER GmbH added two new models to its product portfolio with its new 3D series—the HBE320-523 3D and LPS-T 3D. The high-performance bandsaw machines were developed to separate additively manufactured parts of different shapes and sizes. 

Ohnhäuser GmbH from Wallerstein is primarily known as a contract manufacturer and premium supplier for the aerospace industry. To manage the demands of manufacturing bionically constructed parts, the company expanded its production methods to include additive manufacturing. In the latest stage of development in 3D printing, Ohnhäuser is concentrating on the use of a special titanium powder, optimised for aerospace requirements. As a material, titanium boasts strength characteristics in the range of tempered steel with a comparatively low weight. An EOS M 290 printer is used to generate the 3D metal parts.

After additive manufacturing, the titanium parts must be separated from the printing plate. While carrying out research into a suitable separation process it became clear that only a saw system would make the cut. “We then contacted BEHRINGER to ask what solutions our bandsaw manufacturer could offer” recalls Moritz Färber. “Ohnhäuser had been using a bandsaw machine from BEHRINGER for several years, so we knew the company was a high-quality and reliable manufacturer of saw machines.”

Precision Sawing of a Range of Materials

When it comes to highly-sensitive 3D printing, accurate separation of the part from the printing plate is essential. Deviations in the cut or drifting out of the cutting channel is not permitted, as this would damage either the base plate or the printed parts.

The HBE320-523 3D is based on the already established HBE Dynamic series—featuring robust construction, energy-efficient drive system, and above all, accurate sawing. It cuts the inserted materials with precision to a tolerance of tenths, whether it be steel, aluminium, nickel-based alloys, titanium or plastic. The bandsaw blades can also be quickly and flexibly changed to suit the material that is being sawn. All the machine’s blade-guidance parts are cast in Behringer’s in-house foundry. The grey cast iron dampens vibrations and reduces unpleasant background noise during cutting. All these factors have a positive effect on the sawing process, resulting in high cutting performance and a long bandsaw service life.

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Driving Hard On The Race Track: Wear-Resistant Iglidur Gears In The Gearbox

Driving Hard On The Race Track: Wear-Resistant iglidur Gears In The Gearbox

The iglidur I6 gears from the 3D printer for car racing of the “Youth Discovers Technology” (Jugend entdeckt Technik – JET) challenge

Electromobility is a crucial topic of the future. For Germany to be in the pole position, it is important to inspire young minds to take up scientific and engineering professions. Towards this purpose, the annual JET Challenge takes place at the IdeenExpo in Hanover. Students are given the task of building a fast, tough and energy-efficient racing car from a standard, remote-controlled car with a limited budget. Wear-resistant 3D-printed gears from igus made from the high-performance plastic iglidur I6 helped in this endeavour.

Build a fast, energy-saving racing car from an ordinary, remote-controlled car and overtake all other teams in a race – that’s the goal of the “Youth Discovers Technology” (Jugend entdeckt Technik – JET) Challenge, organised by the Society of German Engineers (Verein Deutscher Ingenieure – VDI) and the University of Hanover (Hochschule Hannover – HSH). As with the renowned models, the key factor is not speed alone, but also energy efficiency. In June 2019, visitors to the IdeenExpo can see the JET Challenge in action at the HSH trade fair stand. 25 teams compete for victory with their racing cars on a 1:10 scale on a 20-metre race track. The rules are strict. Available to each team is a budget of just 50 euros. Apart from battery, motor and speed controller, all components must be purchased, developed or built by yourself.

Save money with the igus 3D printing service

The teams are currently preparing for the next IdeenExpo. Students of the Eugen Reintjes vocational school are relying on a wear-resistant and tough gear transmission to enhance the performance of their race car. The biggest difficulty with this gearbox was the gear procurement. Due to the small budget, the students couldn’t afford big innovations. Finally, they found what they were looking for at the motion plastics specialist igus in Cologne: cost-effective, low-wear gears from the SLS printer. After a simple online configuration, the gears were printed and provided, made from the high-performance plastic iglidur I6.

High performance plastic makes race cars tough

Laboratory tests prove that the material I6 is significantly tougher than other plastics. In an experiment at our in-house test laboratory, the engineers tested gears made of polyoxymethylene (POM) and iglidur I6 at 12 revolutions per minute and loaded with 5Nm. A machined gear made of POM failed after 621,000 revolutions, while iglidur I6 was still in very good condition after one million revolutions. Thus, the team does not have to worry about potential failures. The gears in the racing car have already successfully completed an initial test run. The car is energy efficient and still reaches the top speed of 60km/h.

The young engineers support from igus promotes innovative projects

Innovative projects such as the race car gears for the JET Challenge are supported by igus as part of the young engineers support. The initiative supports young pupils, students and inventors in the development and execution of their technical projects.

 

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Globaldata: VW Group Bets Big On Industrial Scale To Counter Tesla

Vinfast Opens R&D Center In Australia

 

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