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TRUMPF Unveils New New 3D Printer To Help Fabricators Move Into Mass Production

TRUMPF Unveils New New 3D printer To Help Fabricators Move Into Mass Production

TRUMPF has unveiled the new series of its TruPrint 3000 3D printing system at a virtual customer event. The medium-format machine uses powder-bed-based laser melting to produce parts with a diameter of up to 300 millimeters and a height of up to 400 millimeters. It can handle all weldable materials including steels, nickel-based alloys, titanium and aluminum.

“We’ve improved key aspects of the TruPrint 3000 to tailor it even more closely to the quality requirements, certifications and production processes of various industries,” says Klaus Parey, managing director of TRUMPF Additive Manufacturing.

The new TruPrint 3000 can be equipped with a second laser that almost doubles its productivity. “The multilaser option significantly reduces part costs – that’s how we help our customers make the move into mass production,” says Parey.

Two 500-watt lasers scan the machine’s entire build chamber in parallel. This makes production much faster and more efficient regardless of the number and geometries of the parts. With the Automatic Multilaser Alignment option, the system can automatically monitor the multilaser scan fields during the build stage and calibrate them to each other. With each laser scanning a contour, the process does not lead to any kind of weld seams. This is what allows multilaser parts to meet such outstanding quality standards.

The TRUMPF experts have transformed the movement of inert gas through the TruPrint 3000. The way in which it flows through the machine from back to front is now even steadier and more uniform. As well as boosting the quality of printed parts, this also allows the operator to remove excess powder from the part while it is still inside the machine. Previous models required the operator to take the part out and remove the powder at a separate station. The new machine is designed to process the powder in a shielded environment, using an inert gas to prevent the powder from becoming contaminated during the build. This is a major advantage for sensitive industries such as medical device manufacturing.

 

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A.I. Engineering Pioneer Hyperganic Raises $7.8m Funding For R&D Expansion In Singapore

A.I. Engineering Pioneer Hyperganic Raises $7.8m Funding For R&D Expansion In Singapore

Hyperganic has announced the closing of $7.8m in funding, with a focus on significantly expanding their presence in Singapore. The round is led by German funds HV Capital and VSquared Ventures. Co-investors are US-based tech fund Converge, industrial partner Swarovski and PC pioneer Hermann Hauser, co-founder of ARM.

Hyperganic was founded in 2017 to radically accelerate innovation in design, engineering and production of physical objects. The company drives a paradigm shift, where complex products are created by computer algorithms and Artificial Intelligence. The resulting objects are traded digitally and manufactured in digital factories based on industrial 3D printing (Additive Manufacturing).

The investment will drive a significant expansion of the existing Hyperganic team and the establishment of R&D centers in both Singapore and China.

“Humanity’s biggest challenges can only be solved through a giant leap in technology. We’ve created Hyperganic to fundamentally change how we design and build the things around us. Now we are ready to shift gears. We are happy to have the support of such a diverse team of investors on this exciting journey,” said Lin Kayser, co-founder and CEO, Hyperganic.

Hyperganic will use Singapore as a key pillar of the company’s development strategy. This decision was driven by the country’s investment in a vibrant deep technology ecosystem, specifically for advanced manufacturing technologies such as A.I., robotics and industrial 3D printing. As part of Singapore’s five-year RIE (Research, Innovation, Enterprise) plans, NAMIC, the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Cluster, was incepted to orchestrate and implement strategies for the future of production.

“Singapore is one of only a few countries which have recognised the seismic shift happening through digital factories based on Additive Manufacturing. The products designed by our Singapore A.I. engineers will be game changers for many industries that are highly relevant to the region. With NAMIC, Singapore has a unique organisation that demonstrates the country’s strategic commitment to transforming an entire industry sector,” said Kayser.

“We have engaged Hyperganic as early as 2018 when it was in stealth mode, after Lin and I met at a conference. Back then, it was extraordinary to me what the company had envisaged — a paradigm shift in the way people design, using algorithms to create functional products with biomimicry designs. We are delighted to be partnering with Hyperganic on their growth journey, and excited by its plans to rapidly expand its footprint in Singapore and Asia,” said Dr. Chaw Sing Ho, Director, NAMIC Singapore.

 

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Safran And SLM Solutions Evaluate SLM Technology For Additively Manufactured Main Fitting Of A Bizjet

Safran And SLM Solutions Evaluate SLM technology For Additively Manufactured Main Fitting Of A Bizjet

In a joint project, Safran Landing Systems and SLM Solutions tested Selective Laser Melting to produce a component of a nose landing gear for a bizjet. A world first for a part of this size.

The joint objective of the project is to demonstrate the feasibility to produce a main fitting by Selective Laser Melting process. The component was therefore redesigned for metal-based additive manufacturing allowing time saving in the whole process, and significant weight reduction about 15 percent of the component.

Due to the stringent requirements of this component, which is one of the parts that transfers the loads from the wheel to the aircraft structure and is retracted after take-off, Safran selected the titanium alloy, as it is a material with high mechanical properties, naturally resistant to corrosion, which does not require any surface treatment. Additionally, it helps increasing part durability.

Thierry Berenger, Additive Manufacturing project leader at Safran Landing Systems says: “We chose SLM Solutions as a partner, because of their expertise and the SLM 800 machine, which exactly meets our requirements in terms of machine size and reliability.”

With a vertically extended build envelope, the SLM 800 is perfectly adapted to produce large components. The machine is equipped with SLM Solutions’ proven quad-laser technology and innovative features, like the patented gas flow and a permanent filter, that ensure highest reliability.

One of the strengths of the SLM technology is its flexibility. Design changes can be quickly modified, printed and tested, then less time is spent during the prototype development.

Gerhard Bierleutgeb, EVP Global Services & Solutions at SLM Solutions explains: “Additive manufacturing contributes to save time in the qualification and certification phases by rapidly providing the parts for testing. We were able to produce the main fitting in few days on the SLM 800, vs few months with the forging process.”

Part Information:

  • Measurements: 455x295x805 mm
  • Material: Titanium
  • Machine: SLM 800

This new design invented by Safran Landing Systems, meeting ambitious resistance and mass reduction objectives, is patented.

 

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Unlocking New Additive Applications In Asia With Chemical Vapor Smoothing

Unlocking New Additive Applications In Asia With Chemical Vapor Smoothing

Additive3D Asia in collaboration with Additive Manufacturing Technologies (AMT), jointly hosted their first webinar for the Asia Pacific region entitled “Unlocking New Additive Applications in Asia with Chemical Vapor Smoothing”.  Speaking at the session were Mr. Jason Joo, Co-Founder of Additive3D Asia and Mr. Joseph Crabtree, CEO and Founder of AMT.

The webinar addressed the current key challenges of 3D printing and the quality issues of 3D printed parts. AMT gave a deeper insight with actual case studies and demonstrated how AMT’s PostPro Chemical Vapor Smoothing patented technology can benefit users. This includes better strength, surface finishing, smoothness, and watertightness to the 3D printed part close like from injection moulding process.

To deliver a better 3D printing experience, Additive3D Asia who is AMT’s authorised PostPro Production Partner offers the Post Processing treatment as a Service to all customers in Singapore and across the APAC region.

Suitable for all Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM), Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) and HP MultiJet Fusion (MJF) and other Powder Bed Fusion (PBF) technology, the Chemical Vapor Smoothing can now process up to 95 percent of the different 3D printing materials available in the open market. Varies industries from Aerospace, Automotive, Medical, Consumer Products, Lifestyles, Industrial and others will be able to experience up to 200 percent of return to their business by switching to this new post processing technology.

“Collaborating with Additive3D Asia is another example of AMT’s commitment to unlock the full potential of additive manufacturing across the globe. We are delighted to have Additive3D Asia as our first official production partner in Singapore and look forward to supporting their business growth and open up new opportunities for high-quality, customised applications,” commented Mr. Joseph Crabtree

To watch the recording of the webinar, visit: https://additive3dasia.com/vapor-smoothing/contact-webinar-recording/

 

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3D Printing Solutions For The Automotive Industry

3D Printing Solutions for the Automotive Industry

SLM Solutions looks back on years of experience in 3D printing solutions for the automotive industry. But what does it take to successfully print automotive parts? And what are the main use cases?

Metal additive manufacturing technology is accelerating industrial development in the automotive sector and offers numerous advantages. On the one hand, scalable on-demand local-for-local supply chains can get products to market faster and reduce costs. On the other hand, additive manufacturing can lead to improved performance and functionality of parts.

Selective laser melting (SLM) can be used primarily to bridge the gap between prototyping and series production. Pioneer and metal additive manufacturing partner SLM Solutions looks back on years of experience in 3D printing solutions for the automotive industry. But what does it take to successfully print automotive parts? And what are the main use cases?

Robust Machines and Material

To successfully print parts, robust and reliable machines are required. SLM Solutions’ SLM 500 offers excellent features for industrial series production in the automotive industry. As the first quad-laser system on the market, the machine is ideally suited for the rapid cost-effective production of large metal parts. The multi-laser overlap strategy with up to four 700 W lasers ensures maximum efficiency. The ability to change the build cylinder minimizes machine downtime, maximizes productivity and reduces cost per part. 

Equally important is the right choice of metal powder. SLM Solutions offers various alloys, for example, aluminium alloys, nickel alloys, and titanium alloys, that ideally fit to the requirements of the automotive industry. Furthermore, SLM Solutions develops new materials and parameters with customers. 

Another technology from SLM is the NXG XII 600. Equipped with 12 overlapping 1 kW lasers and a build envelope of 600x600x600 mm, the machine sets new milestones in terms of productivity, size, reliability and safety, and paves the way to the future of manufacturing. Productivity is further enhanced through variable beam spot, bi-directional recoating, laser balance and an optimized gas flow while a closed environment maximizes operator safety.

One company that has already tested the productivity of the NXG XII 600 is Porsche. The Porsche advanced powertrain engineering department also focuses on large powertrain applications, such as e-drive housings, cylinder blocks, and cylinder heads, to name a few, in additive manufacturing. In a proof of concept with the SLM  NXG XII 600, a complete e-drive housing with an innovative AM design was successfully printed. Porsche sets high quality demands on the part: A permanent magnet motor with 800 V operating voltage delivers up to 205 kW (280 hp). The downstream two-stage transmission is integrated in the same housing and drives the wheels with up to 2,100 N-m of torque. This highly integrated approach is designed for use on the front axle of a sports car.

All the advantages of additive manufacturing have been implemented in this housing, such as topology optimization with lattice structures to reduce the weight, functional integration of cooling channels, higher stiffness and reduced assembly time by the integration of parts as well as improvements in part quality.

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Leading A Sustainable Revolution: Ford And HP Collaborate To Transform 3D Waste Into Auto Parts

Leading A Sustainable Revolution: Ford And HP Collaborate To Transform 3D Waste Into Auto Parts

Ford is teaming up with HP to innovatively reuse spent 3D printed powders and parts, closing the loop and turning them into injection molded vehicle parts – an industry first.

Sustainability is a priority for both iconic companies, which through joint exploration led to this unlikely, earth-friendly solution. The resulting injection molded parts are better for the environment with no compromise in the durability and quality standards Ford and its customers demand.

The recycled materials are being used to manufacture injection-molded fuel-line clips installed first on Super Duty F-250 trucks. The parts have better chemical and moisture resistance than conventional versions, are seven percent lighter and cost 10 percent less. The Ford research team has identified 10 other fuel-line clips on existing vehicles that could benefit from this innovative use of material and are migrating it to future models.

“Finding new ways to work with sustainable materials, reducing waste and leading the development of the circular economy are passions at Ford,” said Debbie Mielewski, Ford technical fellow, Sustainability. “Many companies are finding great uses for 3D printing technologies, but, together with HP, we’re the first to find a high-value application for waste powder that likely would have gone to landfill, transforming it into functional and durable auto parts.”

HP 3D printers are already designed for high efficiency, with systems and structures to minimise the excess material they generate and reuse a greater percentage of the materials put into them. Working with Ford, which uses HP’s 3D printing technology at the company’s Advanced Manufacturing Center, the team created this solution that produces zero waste.

“You get more sustainable manufacturing processes with 3D, but we are always striving to do more, driving our industry forward to find new ways to reduce, reuse and recycle powders and parts,” said Ellen Jackowski, chief sustainability and social impact officer, HP. “Our collaboration with Ford extends the environmental benefits of 3D printing even further, showcasing how we are bringing entirely different industries together to make better use of spent manufacturing materials, enabling a new circular economy.”

For its part, Ford is developing new applications and utilising a multitude of different processes and materials for 3D printing, including filaments, sand, powders and liquid vat polymerisation. The company already employs 3D printing for a variety of low-volume commercial vehicle parts, as well as fixtures used by assembly line workers use, saving production time and enhancing quality.

 

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EOS And Audi Expand Range Of Applications For Metal 3D Printing

EOS And Audi Expand Range Of Applications For Metal 3D Printing

AUDI AG is relying entirely on industrial 3D printing at its Metal 3D Printing Centre in Ingolstadt for the production of selected tool segments. Additive manufacturing (AM) with EOS technology is used for 12 segments of four tools for hot forming. Plans call for significantly more segments to be printed this way. Audi uses the tool segments produced using the EOS M 400 system in its press shop to make body panels for models including the Audi A4. The company plans to do the same for future electric vehicles.

Shifting part of its tool segment production activities from conventional manufacturing to AM is an important step, highlighting both the quality and reliability of industrial 3D printing and the design freedom advantages this production method offers. This is the latest outcome of the longstanding cooperative relationship between Audi and EOS in Ingolstadt. EOS provided support in the form of technology and know-how before and during the construction of Audi’s 3D printing centre back in 2016. Since then, experts from both companies have been making steady progress on the use of AM, and Audi has established an ideal application in the area of hot forming for series vehicles. Several hundred thousand parts have already been produced using the 3D-printed tools and installed in selected models.

“From initial qualification by EOS to internal further development and refinement of the entire process chain through to standardisation of a new production method, we are now reaping the fruits of years of development within Audi’s production organisation. Whenever conventional manufacturing methods reach their limit, we use additive manufacturing – which lets us meet quality standards and comply with production times,” said Matthias Herker, Technical Project Manager at the Audi Metal 3D Printing Center

Advantages of 3D printing for tooling

When additive manufacturing is used at the Audi Metal 3D Printing Center, the focus is on hot forming segments and high-pressure die casting tool inserts. The design department in Ingolstadt creates entire tools, which can measure as much as 5 x 3 meters. The individual additively manufactured tool segments in turn can be up to 400 mm in length and weigh as much as 120 kg. The size and complexity of the tool segments mean that construction times of up to 20 days are not uncommon, which is why the reliability and quality of the EOS M 400 3D printing system that is used are crucial success factors.

3D printing makes it possible to create highly complex cooling channels configured for the specific component within the tool segments. This provides contoured, more-even cooling, making it possible to shorten cycle times with outstanding quality – a critical point for series production of the actual vehicle component.

 

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ExOne And Ford Develops Automotive Industry-First Binder Jet Aluminum 3D Printing And High-Density Sintering

ExOne And Ford Develops Automotive Industry-First Binder Jet Aluminum 3D Printing And High-Density Sintering

In a project co-funded by Ford Motor Company and the ExOne Company, a team of engineers, material scientists, and manufacturing experts has developed a patent-pending process for rapid and reliable binder jet 3D printing and sintering of aluminum that delivers properties comparable to die casting.

Delivering a commercially viable achievement in this area has evaded researchers for more than a decade. The new process is expected to increase Ford’s efficiency by allowing the company to affordably produce complex parts uniquely designed for additive manufacturing, which enables size and weight reductions, part consolidation, and performance improvements.

“This is a breakthrough in making 3D printed and sintered parts for the auto industry,” said Harold Sears, Ford technical leader for additive manufacturing.

“While the 3D-printing process is very different than stamping body panels, we understand the behavior of aluminum better today, as well as its value in light-weighting vehicles. High-speed aluminum 3D printing paves the way for other opportunities that we’re just now starting to take a look at because of the ability to do complex parts with aluminum that previously weren’t possible. It’s really opening doors for other opportunities.”

“Developing a fast, affordable, and easy way to 3D print aluminum with traditional material properties is a critical step toward light-weighting more products and delivering a more sustainable future,” said John Hartner, ExOne CEO.

The new innovation came about through the process of binder jetting, widely regarded as the fastest method of metal 3D printing for high-volume output. It uses a digital file to quickly inkjet a binder into a bed of powder particles such as metal, sand, or ceramic to create a solid part, one thin layer at a time. When printing metals, the final bound metal part must be sintered in a furnace to fuse the particles together into a solid object. The heating process reinforces the strength and integrity of the metal, and while the process for sintering stainless steel is well understood, achieving high densities greater than 99 percent is an industry breakthrough for aluminum.

 

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How 3D Printed Injection Moulds Can Reduce Production Time & Tooling Cost

How 3D Printed Injection Moulds Can Reduce Production Time & Tooling Cost

As we all know injection moulding requires high initial investment, specialist equipment and lead time for tooling, this can significantly hinder the speed and cost to introduce new products to the market. However, with the continuous advancements in additive manufacturing 3D printing technology is now offering a cost-cutting, agile alternative solution to quickly design and fabricate mould for small runs of thermoplastics prototypes or end-use parts.

What is injection moulding?

Injection moulding is one of the leading processes for manufacturing plastics as it yields high-quality parts and is cost effective. Widely used for mass-producing identical parts with tight tolerances, it is a fast, intensive process where high heat and pressure are involved to melt thermoplastic and force it inside a mould.

Because of these extreme moulding conditions, the tools are traditionally made out of metal by CNC machining or electric discharge machining (EDM). However, these are expensive industrial methods that require specialised equipment, high-end software, and skilled labour.

Manufacturers are now turning to 3D printing to fabricate injection mould rapidly and at low cost. They can benefit from the speed and flexibility of in-house 3D printing to create the mould and couple it with the production force of injection moulding to deliver a series of units from common thermoplastics in a matter of days.

Challenges

Even though 3D printing moulds can offer these advantages when used appropriately, there are still some limitations. We should not expect the same performance from a 3D printing polymer mould as from a machined metallic one. Critical dimensions are harder to meet, cooling time is longer because the thermal transfer occurs slower in plastic, and printed moulds can easily break under heat and pressure. However, low-run injection moulds are great assets for engineers to deliver limited batches of end-use parts or prototypes in the final plastic, for pre-production tests.

Unlocking in demand mould fabrication with stereolithography (SLA)

Stereolithography (SLA) printing technology is a great choice for moulding. It is characterised by a smooth surface finish and high precision that the mould will transfer to the final part and that also facilitates demoulding.

In a recent webinar, Formlabs discusses how SLA printing enables in-demand mould fabrication to generate hundreds of parts, from idea to production, in a matter of days, at a fraction of the cost. Catch the re-run of the webinar here, and learn:

  • Expert processes to design a 3D printed mould for injection moulding.
  • Which printing and moulding conditions ensure success, including an overview of the Formlabs resins that Novus Applications and Braskem use for the moulds.

Strategies for the post-processing workflow, including ejection and demoulding

Real-life applications

Access the full white paper here and have a closer look at how this hybrid manufacturing process enables on-demand mould fabrication to quickly produce small batches of thermoplastic parts through real-life case studies with Braskem, Holimaker, and Novus Applications.

For more information, click here for an overview of methods and guidelines for using SLA 3D printed moulds in the injection moulding process.

 

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3D Systems Introduces Next Generation ‘High Speed Fusion’ 3D Printing System For Aerospace And Automotive Market Applications

3D Systems Introduces Next Generation ‘High Speed Fusion’ 3D Printing System For Aerospace And Automotive Market Applications

3D Systems has introduced a novel High Speed Fusion industrial 3D printer platform and material portfolio. Developed in a collaboration with Jabil Inc., this unique HSF  family of products, including the Roadrunner 3D printer, is expected to provide the best economics of any high throughput industrial fused-filament offering in the market today. Through the use of advanced electric motion control, this unique system operates at speeds and precision levels well beyond current state-of-the-art production platforms.

With temperature capability and available build areas greater than those of competing systems, combined with an outstanding materials portfolio, the Roadrunner system is designed to address the most demanding aerospace and advanced automotive applications. The result is not only unique application solutions but compelling manufacturing economics driven by the size, speed, and precision of this new technology platform.

“By introducing our High Speed Fusion filament printer, 3D Systems will build on the organisational focus that we adopted in 2020, and expand our presence in growing markets that demand high reliability products such as aerospace and automotive,” said Dr. Jeffrey Graves, president and CEO, 3D Systems.

“Our investments in this solution, and collaboration with Jabil, will allow our customers to increase productivity and performance by using additive manufacturing with a hardware, software, and materials platform that is uniquely designed for the rigors and requirements of an industrial setting. The value proposition, which we believe is compelling, will open new markets for our company that are estimated to be over $400 million, with the promise of new markets, beyond these current opportunities, as the economics of this new technology platform are fully demonstrated.”

Existing industrial fused filament printers have often been constrained by high costs of production and low throughput. In recognising these constraints, Jabil and 3D Systems application and industry experts are applying their combined knowledge to bring to market a robust solution that meets the day-to-day requirements of the most demanding industries. Specific applications include:

  • Direct Printing: aerospace interiors and ducting, drone components, automotive under dash and under hood, and other general industrial applications.
  • Tooling & Fixtures: manufacturing aids, automation and robotics tooling, lift assist tooling, as well as moulds and sacrificial tools.
  • Prototyping Parts: automotive, aerospace, medical, heavy equipment, and general industry support.

3D Systems estimates the current marketplace for these types of industrial solutions is greater than $400 million and further expects this revolutionary solution to open up new markets by filling a large unmet need of balancing low cost and high throughput. The result is that 3D Systems’ High Speed Fusion industrial printer, Roadrunner, is made for manufacturing and solves key limitations of competitive offerings by providing:

  • Highest deposition rates combined with the best dimensional precision of any standard industrial class of fused filament platform.
  • Lowest landed part cost without sacrificing part quality.
  • Capability to process high-performance, high-temp materials, like ULTEM and PA CF with a broad range of general-purpose filaments like ABS and PETg ESD.

“We are proud of the progress the Jabil and 3D Systems teams have made and the ability of this solution to overcome the historical system and sub-system level limitations of current market offerings,” said John Dulchinos, vice president, 3D printing and digital manufacturing, Jabil. “Jabil understands the needs of a large-scale manufacturing environment and we look forward to continuing to collaborate with 3D Systems to make this new system available to the marketplace while also using it within our own factories.”

Application engineering and materials development on the new platform has been underway for more than a year and will continue during 2021, with shipments of the Roadrunner system to begin in 2022.

 

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