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TRUMPF Is Expanding The Scope Of 3D Printing

TRUMPF Is Expanding The Scope Of 3D Printing

With global interest in additive manufacturing technologies on the rise, TRUMPF presents its new 3D printing applications that can drive advances in various industrial sectors.

Additive manufacturing processes enable the creation of unprecedented complex shapes that are both light and stable. With the benefit of digital connectivity, they fit seamlessly into state-of-the-art manufacturing systems in use today. The 3D printer is a key tool for many manufacturing processes ranging from mass customisation to one-off builds. It can print anything from bespoke facial implants to special parts for cars or airplanes. Able to print components in one piece, these systems often spare vendors the effort of multiple manufacturing steps.

“Interest in additive manufacturing technologies remains high because the process’s benefits are proving their merits in more and more practical applications. This applies as much to conventional metalworking companies as it does to future products in the aerospace industry,” said Thomas Fehn, general manager at TRUMPF Additive Manufacturing.

Three examples of TRUMPF 3D printing in industrial manufacturing:

  1. Personalised Craniomaxillofacial Implants

Russian medical device manufacturer CONMET has been using a TRUMPF 3D printer to produce craniomaxillofacial implants since early 2018. 3D printed implants are ready for insertion, precisely fitted and cleaned, before the procedure begins. This enhances patient safety while cutting costs and speeding up surgery. Furthermore, it can print parts that are sturdy and durable while still cushioning against blows. The implant’s porous structures facilitate the ingrowth of healthy tissue. CONMET has managed to reduce the cost of manufacturing craniomaxillofacial implants by around 40 percent.

  1. A Lightweight Mounting Bracket For Communication Satellites

TRUMPF has been commissioned by the space company Tesat-Spaceroom to produce a 3D-printed mounting structure for Germany’s Heinrich Hertz communications satellite, which will be used to test the space-worthiness of new communication technologies. In collaboration with the company AMendate, TRUMPF engineers succeeded in optimising the geometry of the mounting structure and reducing its weight by 55 percent. This optimised mount is both lighter and more robust. During the launch of the satellite the new mounting structure will withstand the same high forces and will hold its shape better.

“This is just one example of how we can use additive processes in satellite construction to reduce weight and increase payload capacity,” says Matthias Müller, industry manager for aerospace and energy at TRUMPF Additive Manufacturing.

  1. Easy-To-Make Sewer Cleaning Nozzles

TRUMPF joined forces with USB Düsen and Heilbronn University of Applied Sciences to demonstrate the benefits of 3D printing in the fabrication of cleaning nozzles for sewers.

The 3D-printed variant eliminates the need for milling and gluing. The component can be printed without any supporting structures, so there is no finishing work to be done afterwards. The software-driven process is far more accurate than manual gluing. Measurements have shown that printing cuts production time by 53 percent. For the first time, this will allow up to 10,000 parts to be manufactured per year. Another benefit is a smoother flowing jet of water. TRUMPF engineers expect the new nozzles to reduce water consumption and boost cleaning performance.

 

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FTI Releases FormingSuite 2019 Feature Pack 1 For Sheet Metal Applications

FTI Releases FormingSuite 2019 Feature Pack 1 For Sheet Metal Applications

Forming Technologies (FTI) has announced the release of the FormingSuite 2019 Feature Pack 1. Designed for sheet metal cost estimators, design engineers, tooling designers, and advanced planning engineers in the automotive, aerospace, consumer product and electronics industries, this feature pack introduces numerous enhancements that ensure the best quality results and performance for all users.

Overall changes to the software’s workbenches and processes allow for Material Utilisation (MUL) and Design for Manufacturability (DFM) concepts to fully be realised. These concepts help customers reduce material waste through virtual tryouts replacing test stampings and addressing formability issues that could threaten the integrity of a part long before the part makes it to the shop floor. New blanking processes in the software allow parts to be nested and created faster, and with much less waste than before, by considering multiple factors in the stamping process. Changes to pilot holes and addendum features integrate real world solutions into the digital process, allowing for increased accuracy, and robust parts and operations.

With this latest release, FormingSuite’s ProcessPlanner module continues to add support for the most specialised processes in sheet metal forming.  The Line Die Plan workbench now allows users to detail the process for blanking in multiple operations (for both online and offline blanking). This new capability improves the visual description of the blanking process as well as the die load, die cost, die size and die weight calculations.  New options for the calculation of cam costs increase flexibility and provide more precise estimates for custom and standard cams for progressive dies and line dies.  Rounding out the changes to this workbench, a new display option in the ProgDie Process summary display shows the die size along with the process layout.

The COSTOPTIMISER module now boasts substantial improvements in nesting solver speed as well as two new display options to show carrier condition and the 3D part along with the layout.  Cost Optimisation of nesting layouts now allows users to choose if the part is cropped while maintaining the addendum offset, or if the addendum is cut without affecting the part. This change gives users the tools needed to effectively evaluate material cost savings opportunities on parts formed with addendum. Extending upon FormingSuite’s unique capabilities for introducing and evaluating web and carrier geometry, the pilot hole tool now provides the option of adding material around pilot holes as is common in real world strip designs. This allows engineers to ensure the integrity of their strip layouts in the software and on the shop floor.

Finally, significant updates have been made to trimming in FastIncremental. Automatic mesh refinement during trimming ensures that results of trim operations are precise. Automatic trimming now provides quicker solutions and more accurate results.

“We’re very excited to be announcing our latest release around HxGN LIVE with the focus being on data driven sustainability this year.” Says FTI’s CEO and President Michael Gallagher. “One of the main tenets of our software is to maximise Material Utilisation, which not only saves our customers millions of dollars, but uses data to reduce waste and make the stamping process more sustainable.”

 

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Paris Air Show: TRUMPF Showcases How 3D Printing Improves Satellites And Aircraft

Paris Air Show: TRUMPF Showcases How 3D Printing Improves Satellites And Aircraft

At the Paris Air Show this week, TRUMPF is demonstrating how additive manufacturing (AM) can improve satellites and aircraft.

Satellites are subject to a whole array of ever more stringent requirements. On the one hand, they need to be as light as possible, because every kilogramme that a launch vehicle carries into space costs the client several hundred thousand euros. At the same time, however, satellites must be robust enough to withstand the tremendous forces experienced during launch.

Weight reduction is equally important for aircraft because it leads to a significant drop in fuel consumption. This reduces both their environmental impact and costs.

Additive technologies are the perfect match for the aerospace industry because they enable engineers to create parts that are both lightweight and robust. These methods only add material where it is actually needed, while conventional methods such as milling and casting often struggle to eliminate superfluous material. 3D printers are also adept at handling light metals such as aluminium and titanium, and AM engineers enjoy much more freedom in the design process because they are not confined by the limitations of traditional production methods.

TRUMPF offers expertise in both the key methods required by the aerospace industry: laser metal fusion (LMF), which is carried out entirely within the confines of the 3D printer, with a laser building up the part layer by layer from a powder bed; and laser metal deposition (LMD), which uses a laser beam to build up layers on the surface of a part, with the metal powder being injected through a nozzle.

Three Examples of How 3D Printing is Improving the Aerospace Industry:

  1. Weight of satellite mounting structure reduced by 55 percent

TRUMPF has been commissioned by the space company Tesat-Spaceroom GmbH& Co. KG to produce a 3D-printed mounting structure for Germany’s Heinrich Hertz communications satellite, which will be used to test the space-worthiness of new communication technologies. The mounting structure includes strap-on motors that are used to modulate microwave filters.

In collaboration with the company AMendate, engineers succeeded in optimising the topology of the mounting structure and reducing its weight by 55 percent. The mount now weighs just 75 grams instead of 164 grams.

The team of experts printed the redesigned part on TRUMPF’s TruPrint 3000 3D printer. The new geometry cannot be produced using conventional methods. Apart from being lighter, the optimised mounting structure is also more robust. During the launch of the satellite, the new mounting structure will withstand the same high forces and will hold its shape better. The Heinrich Hertz satellite mission is carried out by DLR Space Administration on behalf of the Federal Ministry of Economics and Energy and with the participation of the Federal Ministry of Defence.

  1. Cost of engine parts reduced by 74 percent

TRUMPF is also showcasing an AM use case for the aviation sector at the Paris Air Show. In collaboration with Spanish supplier Ramem, TRUMPF experts have employed 3D printing to optimise a part known as a ‘rake.’ Manufacturers use this part during engine development to measure the pressure and temperature of the engine. These kinds of measurements are an important part of testing aircraft performance. Mounted directly in the engine’s air flow, rakes are exposed to extreme temperatures and high pressure. To deliver accurate measurements, they must conform to precise dimensional requirements. Producing rakes by conventional means is an expensive and time-consuming process.

Workers produce the base structure on a milling machine before inserting six delicate tubes, welding them into place and sealing the body of the rake with a cover plate. If just one of these tubes is out of place, the rake has to be scrapped. TRUMPF produced an optimised rake geometry on the TruPrint 1000 3D printer. Redesigning the part in this way makes it quicker for the manufacturer to produce and reduces the amount of material used by around 80 percent, ultimately slashing the overall cost by 74 percent.

  1. Making engine blades easier to repair

TRUMPF is also presenting some sample applications of LMD technology at the Paris Air Show. These include the LMD repair of a high-pressure compressor blade—also known as a 3D aeroblade—used in aircraft engines. Apart from having to withstand extreme changes in temperature during flight, these components are also in constant contact with dust and water, and they typically show signs of wear on the edges and tips, requiring aviation engineers to periodically repair the blades to maintain engine efficiency.

The LMD method is perfect for this job, as in some sections of the blades, the material is just 0.2mm thick. Conventional methods quickly reach their limits in these kinds of applications. With LMD technology, however, the laser can be positioned with an accuracy of approximately one hundredth of a millimetre before it applies a precisely calculated dose of energy. At the same time, the system feeds in material of exactly the same composition as the part itself. This process makes it easy to repair the blades multiple times, significantly reducing the cost per part in each engine overhaul.

 

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Siemens Launches IPP&E Solution For Aerospace And Defence

Siemens Launches IPP&E Solution For Aerospace And Defence

Siemens Digital Industries Software’s Integrated Program Planning and Execution (IPP&E) solution is designed to help companies in the aerospace and defence industry gain competitive advantages to win and execute programmes in a more effective and profitable manner. Siemens’ IPP&E solution provides a systems approach to programme planning and execution by integrating cost, schedule and technical requirements in a fully planned, resourced and budgeted programme management software solution.

Today’s aerospace and defence companies face increased cost and schedule pressures on as they execute on new programs. Companies need to provide accurate and complete bids to reduce proposal expenses and risks, and help control programme costs and schedules during program execution. A common and reusable approach to project planning uses historical data to improve basis of estimates by evaluating historical costs, schedule and risks, improving the accuracy of bids and business cases and drive improvements in overall programme performance.

Siemens’ new solution enables aerospace manufacturers to start new programmes quickly by reusing experience, risks and artefacts from past projects through a common work breakdown structure. Estimates can be created based on past performance, integrating cost, schedule, requirements, processes, inputs, and outputs for a complete work package definition. It provides a single source for all programme estimating and execution information, including risk and opportunity management to successfully deliver programmes in the current environment, ultimately improving profits, reputation and the ability to invest in and win new programmes.

 

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Marshall Aerospace And Defence Using Stratasys Tech For 3D Printing Of Aircraft Parts

Marshall Aerospace and Defence Using Stratasys Tech For 3D Printing Of Aircraft Parts

Marshall Aerospace and Defence Group, one of the world’s largest privately owned and independent aerospace and defence companies, is now using advanced 3D printing from Stratasys to manufacture, flight-ready parts for several of its military, civil and business aircraft, while producing specific ground-running equipment at a lower cost than aluminium alternatives.

Marshall already has several pieces of 3D-printed ductwork flying on heavily modified aircraft, as well as holders for safety knives and switches for aircraft interiors. 3D printing flight-approved parts on demand enables the company to produce lighter parts than traditional methods, significantly faster and at lower cost.

According to Chris Botting, Materials, Processes and Additive Manufacturing Engineer at Marshall ADG, the ability to create accurate, repeatable and reliable 3D printed parts using aerospace-approved materials are key factors in achieving the performance requirements necessary for use within aircraft.

The company is using the Stratasys Fortus 450mc FDM Printer and ULTEM 9085 resin, a tough, yet lightweight 3D printing material with high thermal and chemical resistance. This has been crucial to overcoming the stringent requirements of the aerospace industry, as they can now 3D print parts with the desired flame, smoke and toxicity properties for use on aircraft interiors.

Marshall is also utilising its Fortus 450mc 3D printer to build final parts on the ground. Marshall recently created a ducting adapter prototype for vital ground-running equipment—essential for providing fresh air to cool the aircraft’s avionics. 3D printing this particular part helped Marshall transition from typically costly aluminium processes.

The group is also using Stratasys 3D printers for a range of complex tooling applications, including drill jigs, masking templates, bonded fixtures and composite mould tooling. The team regularly produces customised, low-volume production tools within just 24 hours of an engineer’s request. In fact, they are driving use of 3D-printed thermoplastic tools to replace heavy metal tools, reducing the burden on the operator, and crucially, reducing cost and lead times on urgent operational tasks.

Botting foresees the use of Stratasys FDM additive manufacturing to increase across all elements of the business and to drive new applications.

 

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Iscar Expands Range Of Solid Carbide Milling Heads For The Aerospace Industry

Iscar Expands Range Of Solid Carbide Milling Heads For The Aerospace Industry

Iscar is expanding its MULTI-MASTER solid carbide milling heads for the aerospace industry with new interchangeable models featuring a 100° point angle. The solid carbide milling heads are suitable for chamfering, countersinking, and spot drilling applications.

The new interchangeable heads are available in four diametre sizes: 9.525mm, 12.7mm, 15.875mm, and 19.05mm. They are designed mainly for countersink holes for head cap screws according to ISO 5856, DIN EN 4072, IS 15437 standards; and for rivets according to MIL-STD-40007. The heads can also be applied for machining countersink holes for general-use 100 deg flat countersunk head machine screws, in accordance with ANSI B18.6.3-1972 standard. Most aircraft countersunk screws require a 100° angle countersink.

 

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Hexagon To Showcase Digital Transformation Of Aerospace Manufacturing At Paris Air Show 2019

Hexagon To Showcase Digital Transformation Of Aerospace Manufacturing At Paris Air Show 2019

Hexagon will demonstrate how it is innovating to meet the fast-evolving needs of the aerospace and defence industries with a range of connected software and hardware systems at the Paris Air Show 2019, which is being held on June 17–23.

Visitors to the aerospace exhibition will see first-hand how discrete software and hardware solutions from Hexagon’s Manufacturing Intelligence division connect to form tool chains that lay the foundations for data-driven aerospace manufacturing ecosystems. On Hexagon’s stand, a continuous digital process, using digital twin and equipment monitoring technology, will show the development of an aeroengine blade from the design and engineering stages, through production, to the final quality inspection of the finished blade by the GLOBAL S HTA CMM solution.

Hexagon’s software and hardware systems underpin aerospace manufacturing at every level of design, production and final assembly on all sizes of parts and types of aircraft. They also support aircraft maintenance repair and overhaul. A Leica Absolute Tracker ATS600 on the stand will display the benefit of using large-volume 3D measurement for large structural assembly.

At the Paris Air Show, there will also be an opportunity to see Hexagon’s Geospatial division’s demonstration of a 3D flight training simulator based on Luciad technology. It combines static flight plans and dynamic aeronautical data, and provides real-time and post-training feedback and evaluation of any deviations from the designated flight plan and the disruptions that might cause.

Hexagon will be on hall 2B, stand D157.

 

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Global Forging Market To Reach US$96B By 2025

Global Forging Market To Reach US$96B By 2025

The global forging market is expected to register a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 4.4 percent between 2017 and 2025 to reach US$96.4 billion by the end of the forecast period, according to a new report by Transparency Market Research.

Mainly driving this growth is the rising application in multiple industries such as construction, wind, aerospace, automotive, and power generation, to name a few. Further driving the growth of the forging market are the high demand for ferrous metals and high-strength metal components, along with cost-effective methods of metal forming. Moreover, use of novel and advanced technologies by key market players is expected to provide a significant push and expand the global forging market.

There are a few challenges seen to deter the growth of the forging market, however. Factors such as the volatile nature of several end-use industries and the expensive high-quality forged steel products are projected to hamper growth in this market. The uncertain partnership between material producers and forging units is also estimated to obstruct growth in this market, so do the increasing environmental concerns, high demand for plastics as a substitute, and growing usage of stamping and casting process. Still, the rapid pace of industrialisation that boosted various industries in emerging economies might help in overcoming these challenges.

Asia Pacific will remain the largest market with impressive growth due to the rapid increase of construction and automotive industries in the region. Furthermore, the huge number of global players in the region also contributes to its growth.

 

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Philippines Starts Construction Of First 3D Printing R&D Centre

Philippines Starts Construction of First 3D Printing R&D Centre

The Philippines will soon have its 3D printing R&D institution as construction is underway for the Advanced Manufacturing Centre (AMCen). Spearheaded by the Department of Science and Technology (DOST), the centre is aimed at promoting research and development in additive manufacturing (AM), commonly known as 3D printing technology.

AMCen will feature two state-of-the-art research facilities that will focus on additive manufacturing R&D. AM allows rapid fabrication of various three-dimensional objects, ranging from small parts to automobile and aircraft, and even structures as big as bridges.

The DOST tapped Dr Rigoberto Advincula, a Balik Scientist and Case Western Reserve University professor,  as consultant for AMCen.

“The AMCen presents a unique position for the Philippines as it will be one of the first government-led centers in the ASEAN region that aspires to be a game-changer leading to Industry 4.0 goals,” said Dr Advincula.

With the support of DOST-PCIEERD (Philippine Council for Industry, Energy and Emerging Technology Research and Development), Dr Advincula will lead the development of the centre together with researchers from the DOST- Industrial Technology Development Institute and the DOST-Metals Industry Research and Development Centre.

AMCen is likewise seen to strengthen the country’s capabilities in 3D printing and advanced design and manufacturing in the following areas: aerospace and defence; biomedical and healthcare; printed electronics; agricultural machinery; and automotive.

 

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Asia To Soar In The Commercial Aircraft MRO Market

Asia To Soar In The Commercial Aircraft MRO Market

The commercial aircraft maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) market is estimated to register a CAGR of 4.35 percent during the forecast period, 2019-2024, according to a report released by Research and Markets.

With the growing air traffic, carriers are more inclined toward maintaining the health of their current fleet, going for new aircraft only if they have no other option, since the cost of buying a new aircraft is considerably higher than the cost for the maintenance of the current fleet. Different airports have introduced improvement processes to enhance efficiency, and several are using new technological systems to gain additional upgrades and prepare for the bigger data requirements of next-generation aircraft, and this shall lead to the growth of the market in the near future.

Asia Pacific is expected to see the highest growth in the MRO market. At present, Asia Pacific is generating the highest revenue in the commercial aircraft MRO market, with Singapore dominating the market in the region. In the recent years, several other Asian countries have also increased their investment in MRO facilities. The market for aircraft maintenance is also changing, as companies in countries like Indonesia and Thailand are also entering the market to challenge the dominance of established Singaporean players.

Government policy also plays a key role, and the Singaporean government has been very forward-looking in supporting the aerospace industry. With the growing frequency of flights to and from the Asian countries, the demand for MRO centres is expected to rise in this region in the coming years. Moreover, due to the huge potential of the Asia-Pacific aviation market, several global players are establishing new centres in the region to cater to the growing demand.

 

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