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Siemens’ AM Network Platform Has Been Implemented At Schaeffler

Siemens’ AM Network Platform Has Been Implemented At Schaeffler

Siemens Digital Industries Software has recently announced that its Additive Manufacturing Network platform has been implemented at Schaeffler, a global automotive and industrial supplier, to connect its community of design engineers with its AM Fab Shop for additive manufacturing to facilitate collaboration, speed time to production and to foster greater application of the benefits of additive manufacturing (AM) within its value-chain.

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Powder Ageing And Additive Manufacturing

Powder Ageing And Additive Manufacturing

In additive manufacturing, powder ageing is defined as the change of powder properties and pick-up of certain elements across multiple process cycles.

Article by EOS.


In the additive manufacturing (AM) of titanium alloys through laser powder bed fusion (LPBF), rapid oxidation takes place in the metal melt pool and the spatters created by the process. Additionally, the laser-powder interaction in repeated process cycles can change the powder properties, such as particle size and powder density. As these effects accumulate, a phenomenon known as powder ageing, they influence the final part properties, setting an upper limit for the powder reuse cycles. The aim of the present study was to investigate the criticality of powder ageing in the LPBF process with EOS Titanium Ti64 Grade 23 powder using statistical analysis and an evaluation of analysis method accuracies. The mechanisms of powder ageing were linked to the ageing effects in the solid parts.

Based on the results, it was concluded that the Ti-6Al-4V ELI powder exhibited moderate ageing behaviour, causing only mild shifting in the final part properties over 22 powder reuse cycles. Despite approaching maximum limits of certain elements of the Ti-6Al-4V ELI composition, the mechanical property requirements defined in the material standard remained fulfilled throughout the experiment.

Full Article Available >> https://bit.ly/3a0vxMz

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An Ecosystem Approach To Drive AM Adoption In Maritime & Offshore

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An Ecosystem Approach To Drive AM Adoption In Maritime & Offshore

An Ecosystem Approach To Drive AM Adoption In Maritime & Offshore

Additive Manufacturing (AM) has seen a surge in interest in recent years in the mobile asset industry, notably the aerospace, automotive, and defence. The Marine and Offshore (M&O) on the other hand, has seen a slower adoption rate in AM. This can be attributed to several reasons.


In the aerospace industry, owing to stringent safety requirements there are much fewer aircraft Equipment Manufacturers, with Airbus and Boeing dominating close to 99% of the commercial aircraft design market share. Similarly, for engine makers, General Electric, Pratt & Whitney, Rolls-Royce, and CFM International contribute to the bulk of the engines used in the market, similarly controlling the aftermarket of parts and services. With large industry verticals providing aftersales of spare parts and the stringent certification of the industry, owners of the aircraft operators have limited options to turn to when it comes to replacing spares. Regardless, aircraft owners generally demand original parts over alternative supply options. However, in the M&O sector, there are over 10 large shipbuilder groups (e.g. Imabari Shipbuilding, Samsung, Yangzijiang Shipbuilding, CSIC, CSSC, Oshima Shipbuilding, Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering, Japan Marine United, and Fincantieri just to name a few) and hundreds other smaller shipbuilders of different tonnage internationally. As for the marine engine and propulsion maker groups, there are over 10 of them (e.g. Rolls-Royce, Caterpillar, Wärtsilä, Cummins, Hyundai, Honda, Mitsubishi, MAN, and Yanmar, etc.). It is hence easy to understand why there is more parts variability within a ship when compared to an aircraft or a car. This explains why M&O has many suppliers for marine spare parts, some with overlapping products, with any parts being supplied by tens of spare manufacturers. For AM to be adopted, original manufacturers will need to get onboard to license their parts to be printed at distributed service bureaus. It is easier to convince a handful of original manufacturers, which are responsible for supplying most of the spare parts in aviation rather than hundreds of original manufacturers for the M&O industry.

Full Article Available >> https://bit.ly/3uAyygj

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Morf3D Announces New State-of-the-Art Headquarters With SLM Solutions’ Machines.

Morf3D Announces New State-of-the-Art Headquarters with SLM Solutions’ Machines.

SLM Solutions’ Outfits Morf3D’s 9000 square-foot Applied Digital Manufacturing Centre (ADMC) with Two SLM® 500s and the NXG XII 600.

By Ashwini Balan, Eastern Trade Media


Morf3D, a subsidiary of Nikon Corporation, helps clients realize the potential of additive manufacturing in a new age of aerospace innovation. SLM Solutions is an integrated solutions provider and metal additive manufacturing partner. The cooperation underscores both SLM Solution’s and Morf3D’s commitment to further advance the industrialisation of Additive Manufacturing(AM) technology as well as to streamline and accelerate serial production lines across the globe. Such industry partnerships aim to significantly scale AM production repeatability and quality to new heights.

The mission of Morf3D’s new headquarters is to leverage partner networks that will transform supply chain norms and develop the industry’s first certified production system to accelerate the industrialisation of Digital Manufacturing. The addition of the 2 SLM®500s and the NXG XII 600 will support Morf3D’s goal of ramping up a global production setup while improving production lead time, order flexibility, cost efficiency, and quality.

SLM®500 is the best performing, most efficient system in its class, and it is designed to ensure operator safety and lower overall operational costs. The first quad-laser metal system on the market, SLM®500 can integrate lasers independently or in parallel to increase build rates by 90% over twin laser configuration. NXG XII 600 on the other hand, is an industry gamechanger equipped with 12 1KW lasers, making it the fastest commercial machine on the market. It’s designed to be used in serial production for high-volume applications as well as for printing large parts. It’s capable of printing at speeds 20x faster than that of a single laser system and 5x faster than a 4-laser machine. Enabling acceleration in AM at every angle, the NXG XII 600 is the modern day “da vinci”, crafting masterpieces at serial production scale.

“Our partnership with SLM Solutions dramatically shifts the landscape of serial production enabling our customers to achieve unmatched levels of quality and performance,” comments Ivan Madera, CEO of Morf3D. “The NXG XII 600 platform is an engineering marvel that addresses many aspects of a production-ready system. Our goal is to accelerate the qualification process by collaborating on new application development and part certification within the aerospace, space, and defense market.”  

Sam O’Leary, CEO of SLM Solutions, is enthusiastic about the partnership, citing the increase in efficiency and productivity as the key benefits for all partners. “Adding the NXG Xll 600 to Morf3D’s SLM Solutions’ machines to the ADMC bolsters the collective digital manufacturing ecosystem, helping to improve production speed, quality, and automation.”

Next to the supply of machines, SLM Solutions will also offer on-site support in the form of education, training, and consulting.  All of ADMC’s research and development partners will also have access to collective training, meeting, and gathering spaces for customer events and business development efforts. Sam O’Leary, adds: “We are united in our customer-first approach, which reflects the training and education we provide to all of our partners.”

The machines will be delivered to Morf3D’s new state-of-the-art headquarters, in Long Beach, California, in 2022. This partnership strengthens the international impact of Additive Manufacturing solutions.

Find out more about their innovations and digital solutions: Morf3D, SLM Solutions.

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3D Metal Printing In The Medical Industry

3D Metal Printing In The Medical Industry

Fast manufacturing and high precision of medical implants are crucial. Metallic additive manufacturing is opening new possibilities for medical and dental application. Article by CADS Additive GmbH.

The medical and dental industry face complex challenges. Fast manufacturing and high precision of medical implants are crucial.

First and foremost, the manufacturing of these implants requires a multitude of preparation and process steps, starting from capturing of patient-specific data using imaging techniques, through creation of implant geometries and their preparation for 3D metal printing, up to post-processing and finishing. New technologies and innovation drive these industries but also the companies themselves. Different demands call for different approaches and solutions.

Here, metallic additive manufacturing opens new possibilities for medical and dental application as well as for partners and suppliers of these industries. Nevertheless, one has to create and manage a large amount of data and map these as efficiently as possible through the whole process. To be successful, efficient data preparation for metal 3D printing is fundamental.

Software for Medical and Dental Technology

Founded as a Joint Venture in 2016, CADS Additive GmbH today is a fully owned subsidiary of the company CADS GmbH, both based in Perg, Austria. CADS Additive stands for developing outstanding software components and intuitive software solutions for 3D metal printing. As a manufacturer of high-performance data preparation and data management software solutions, CADS Additive is an innovative and competent partner in the field of industrial metallic additive manufacturing worldwide.

With the knowledge and expertise in developing intuitive software for medical as well as dental technology, they work with various companies to problem solve and deal with challenges, as well as find new opportunities within the industry.

“Our high-performance software solutions and components are game-changing for their decision on 3D metal printing software. What is further crucial for their 3D printing success,” Daniel Plos, Sales Director at CADS Additive, continues.For other exclusive articles, visit www.equipment-news.com.

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SLM Solutions’ Next Disruption In Additive Manufacturing Vows To Impress

SLM Solutions’ Next Disruption In Additive Manufacturing Vows To Impress

SLM Solutions invites the industry to a game-changing product launch on June 23 at 5pm CEST. The launch will take place digitally and will be accessible to everyone at SLM-SOLUTIONS.COM/THE-BIG-LAUNCH. The new product empowers the creation of metal components with previously impossible designs and unmatched productivity, reducing overall material usage and minimizing the end-part cost to achieve industrial-scale production.

Sam O’Leary, CEO of SLM Solutions, is enthusiastic about the upcoming product launch “Last year we introduced an industry gamechanger—the NXG Xll 600—but we won’t stop there. Today, after three years in the making and care of many of the world’s most visionary engineers, we are proud to add a new technology to our portfolio.”

The groundbreaking product has a record impact on part design and increases the productivity of the entire process by reducing powder consumption and scrap and shortening post-processing times. Likewise, improved thermal management will significantly shorten the build time while substantially reducing part stress. As a result, a surface finish like no other will soon be the new norm.

And—like almost everything they bring to life—it’s holistic. On this topic, O’Leary adds, “Why is it is available for most systems in our portfolio? Because we strive to make every new piece of technology meet the demands of every priorly-built machine. We believe that creating truly open architecture is the only way to bring additive manufacturing to its powerful potential.”

What’s more, the technology’s basic subscription will be completely free of charge. O’Leary explains, “The goal is to be relentless in innovation. It’s free because we want to empower our partners and customer base. Why should this remain an enablement of just a few when it can benefit all?”.

O’Leary concludes that “This new technology is another milestone, not only for us but for the entire industry. As a high-tech company, we are once again shaping the face of additive manufacturing with this product launch. It’s the next disruption in the manufacturing industry, so it’s worth attending.”

What does the next disruption of additive manufacturing look like? SLM Solutions’ industry experts will explain on June 23 at 5pm CEST at the online product launch that includes an open discussion. Participation is free of charge.

Sign up at SLM-SOLUTIONS.COM/THE-BIG-LAUNCH

 

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Additive Manufacturing Standards For Medical Production

Additive Manufacturing Standards For Medical Production

Dedicated standards for medical devices produced using Additive Manufacturing are already in preparation. Gregor Reischle, Head of Additive Manufacturing at TÜV SÜD highlights the importance of additive manufacturing standards for medical devices and what manufacturers need to consider before they start. 

Gregor Reischle

Dedicated standards for medical devices produced using Additive Manufacturing are already in preparation. In future, they will smooth the path for the implementation of new technologies as well as their assessment for approval. In this interview with Asia Pacific Metalworking Equipment News (APMEN), Gregor Reischle, Head of Additive Manufacturing at testing, inspection and certification services provider TÜV SÜD, shares what aspects need to be considered against this backdrop.

Why do we need standards to help us use AM technology for medical production?

Gregor Reischle (GR): Items that are already produced using Additive Manufacturing, such as protective face coverings, masks and visors or products for radiation treatment, are subject to particularly rigorous conformity and safety standards. However, assessment procedures for approval of these products take time – and time is of the essence in a pandemic. Standards help to ensure regulatory requirements are implemented reliably, promptly and cost-effectively, thus minimising risks. They also represent state-of-the-art solutions and serve to concentrate specific knowledge.

There are still no Additive Manufacturing standards designed specifically for medical devices. Where can manufacturers seek guidance in the meantime?

GR: We have drawn up checklists for all the most important requirements in the main standards and regulations relating to Additive Manufacturing, covering those that set out more general terms as well as the first more specific requirements. We are currently providing the checklists free of charge International standard organisations such as ASTM International and ISO are likewise providing access to relevant standards free of charge at the moment, for items such as personal protective equipment and medical devices. This benefits testing laboratories, healthcare specialists and the general public.

How widespread are 3D-printed medical devices?

GR: Conventionally manufactured products still make up the majority. Anyone using 3D printing today is pursuing strategic aims and is willing to invest a lot of time in such products. Additive manufacturing is only widespread in specific areas of medical engineering, like prosthetics and dental technology. In fact, probably all the major manufacturers in the dental industry now supply 3D printers, some of which can even be used in medical practices. 

What changes will the MDR introduce in this respect compared to its predecessor, the MDD?

GR: Under the Medical Device Directive (MDD), these “custom-made products” can be used without the need for CE marking. Although the same will apply under the Medical Device Regulation (MDR), manufacturers of class III implantable custom products will now need to call in a Notified Body to perform conformity assessment of their quality management system. Many products will fall into a higher class under the MDR, and this may require the involvement of a Notified Body in some cases. Custom-made products will be replaced by a common basic model which is customised for patient-specific use.

How will upcoming standards support the requirements to fulfil regulatory requirements such as MDR conformity? And which existing standards could already be useful?

GR: The requirements of the MDR state that a Notified Body must assess the manufacturer’s quality management system and verify compliance of its processes with the state of the art. DIN SPEC 17071—the specification for requirements concerning quality-assured processes at additive manufacturing centres—can usefully be applied here. The guideline is aimed at minimising risks stemming from parts and components produced using Additive Manufacturing, irrespective of the industry or sector. A project to transfer these findings to medical engineering is already under way, and a white paper on the subject will be published very soon. The DIN SPEC 17071 will also be advanced to reach the international ISO/ASTM level; the upcoming ISO 52920 and 52930 represent state-of-the-art quality assurance for AM production.

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Optisys Uses SLM Technology To Manufacture Parts For Space Missions

Optisys Uses SLM Technology To Manufacture Parts For Space Missions

Optisys is a revolutionary RF product development and manufacture company with a unique approach to creating highly integrated products, enabled by metal additive manufacturing. Its well-known customers rely on its broad spectrum of solutions, which includes feeds, slotted flat panels and phased arrays for antenna and radar applications used everywhere from sea to outer space.

With the SLM 500, the company now owns a high-tech metal additive manufacturing system; excellent for producing high-strength metal components. Janos Opra, Optisys CEO, explains: “We are a company that wouldn’t exist without additive manufacturing. The SLM 500 gives us exactly what we need, for example, to manufacture antennas used on space missions.” To do this, the components produced must be able to withstand the harsh conditions of the entire range of space environments from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to deep space probes. Opra explains: “The atomic oxygen in the atmosphere virtually sandblasts the parts. They also must withstand high heat loads, and extreme temperature cycling, on other planets. The SLM parts are not only lightweight, but they can also manage harsh conditions and are particularly robust with excellent performance.”

Compared to conventional manufacturing methods, SLM technology can produce lightweight components by integrating internal hollow structures while maintaining a consistently high component quality. Even small reductions in weight, through component integration, can lead to enormous cost advantages through a reduction in launch costs; which are priced per kg and are a major cost driver for space companies. Due to these unique advantages and the pressure to keep costs to a minimum, conventional manufacturing methods are hardly an option for major players in the space industry.

“Additive manufacturing technology ensures we can create the lightest, strongest and best performing RF products available,” continued Opra. “By coupling large aspects of the RF system into single components or repeatable tiles, our customers can reduce weight enormously over competing suppliers. This is of prime importance for many players in the ‘New Space’ market particularly.”

The SLM 500 is a multi-laser system with up to four 700W lasers working simultaneously. It features closed powder handling with automated powder sieving and supply during the build process without any powder contact. The ability to change the build cylinder minimises machine downtime, maximises productivity and reduces cost per part. Due to a smart assembly in the build envelope, Optisys produces several individual components in one build process with the SLM 500 – something that is particularly efficient and not possible with conventional manufacturing methods.

Sam O’Leary, CEO of SLM Solutions, emphasises: “We are proud that metal-based additive manufacturing is making such an important contribution to space missions. This deployment demonstrates how robust the parts produced with SLM technology are. Innovative, top-tier companies such as Optisys continue to drive additive manufacturing forward and bring it to other planets. It makes us proud to enable their success.”

 

 

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