fbpx skip to Main Content
Aircraft Turned Parts Market To Reach US$ 1.9 Billion In 2025 Amid COVID-19

Aircraft Turned Parts Market to Reach US$ 1.9 Billion In 2025 Amid COVID-19

The aircraft turned parts market is expected to reach an estimated value of US$ 1.9 billion in 2025, impacted by COVID-19 according to Stratview Research market report.

Turning is a machining process used to obtain highly finished cylindrical parts with the help of single point cutting tools. Through turning, both solid, as well as thin-walled cylindrical parts, can be formed.

Impact of COVID-19 on the Aircraft Turned Parts Market

The rapid spread of COVID-19 exacerbated the existing aerospace industry challenges, hampered by the B737 max approval process. The pandemic left no options for aircraft manufacturers but to curtail their key aircraft production rates. For instance, Airbus announced to curtail its production by 1/3rd for 2020 with the revised rate of 40 A320s per month, 6 A350s per month, and 2 A330s per month, owing to a sudden collapse in air passenger traffic in the wake of complete travel ban imposed by several advanced and emerging economies.

Supply chain disruptions, huge cash burns, remote and adjusted work schedules, and huge COVID-19-related costs sacking the profitability are other noticeable effects of the pandemic.

However, strong fundamentals of the market, such as market entry of new aircraft programs; A321XLR, B777X, C919, and MC-21 coupled with a huge pile of order backlogs of Boeing and Airbus (12,816 commercial aircraft backlogs translating 7+ years at continuous production rates), and accelerated demand for replacing iconic aircraft such as A380 and B747 with A321, A350XWB, and B787, are some relieving factors for the entire aerospace community including the aircraft turned parts manufacturers.

It is estimated that the market is set to rebound from 2021 onwards after a nose-dive in 2020, the biggest collapse in the past two decades, and then will maintain a healthy growth pattern in the coming five years.

Asia-Pacific is expected to be the fastest-growing region in the years to come, driven by high long-term growth potential of the region. Commercial aircraft is likely to gain momentum in the region in the long run with the expected growth in the air passenger traffic and upcoming indigenous aircraft program (COMAC C919).

Military aircraft is also subjected to register a noticeable gain in the coming years, primarily driven by increasing defense budget of key economies, such as China, India, and South Korea.

For other exclusive articles, visit www.equipment-news.com.

 

Check these articles out:

Bombardier Invests S$85 Million To Expand Singapore Service Centre

ANCA Launches CIM3D V9 With Time-Saving And User-Friendly Enhancements

How Is COVID-19 Impacting The Aircraft MRO Industry In SEA?

Frost & Sullivan Names Top Innovators In The Global Commercial Aircraft MRO Market

Machine Tool Industry Propels Taiwan To Become World’s Second Largest Masks Manufacturer In Just 40 Days

Smart Factory Market Outlook: US$275.9B By 2026

Aircraft Milled Parts Market To Reach US$4.3B In 2025

 

 

WANT MORE INSIDER NEWS? SUBSCRIBE TO OUR DIGITAL MAGAZINE NOW!

FOLLOW US ON: LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter

 

 

The Benefits Of Composites For Milling Tools And Spindles

The Benefits of Composites for Milling Tools and Spindles

In this article, Dr. Humphrey Carter of CompoTech explains why CFRP tools are a feasible option for machinery manufacturers.

Shaft displacement with temperature. (Credit: Professor Matsubara, Kyoto University.*)

The use of carbon fibre-reinforced plastics (CFRPs) is very widespread in motorsports and the aerospace industry. The exceptional stiffness and lightweight of these materials make them ideal for enhancing the performance of Formula 1 cars and high-speed jet aircraft.

Less widespread is the use of CFRPs for the production of machine tools. The same properties that make these materials so popular in high performance applications can impart significant benefits in this arena too, especially for load-bearing and structural components, or for precision movements.

In particular, the use of CFRP parts can help to improve the speed and acceleration and deceleration of a machine tool, especially over extended distances. The accuracy and repeatability with which, for example, a tool set can be returned to exactly the same location, operation after operation, can have a significant impact on productivity and, through a reduction in weight, operating life.

 

Steel-composite Hybrid Milling Tool

To highlight the benefits of the use of CFRPs in such applications, CompoTech recently developed a steel-composite hybrid milling tool that, in testing, has been shown to perform faster and machine more accurately than conventional options. The tool also imparts improved surface roughness meaning that, in certain circumstances, it can perform the job normally requiring two steel tool sets, for rough and final machining. This increases milling productivity, decreases machining time and reduces machining cost.

The hybrid milling tool is produced by depositing carbon and graphite fibre onto a steel part using a process called robot assisted filament laying (RAFL). The steel body acts both as a mandrel and as a means of connecting the tool to the tool holder and the tool holder to the spindle. It also provides a means for the attachment of the tool to the milling teeth.

After fibre placement, the part is cured at room temperature to reduce the likelihood of any thermally induced stress. It is later machined to its final shape.

The reduction in weight, up to 40 percent, and the increased stiffness provided by the use of graphite and carbon fibres enhances the damping properties. As well as increasing the natural frequency of the tool, reducing unwanted vibrations in the machining process, it gives the tool greater stability.

The low weight of the milling tool means that less energy is used in non-loaded positioning, while the lower inertia reduces peek energy in acceleration. Fortunately, this can also reduce wear on parts of the machine, meaning that the lifetime of the machine and the durability of the tool tip can be increased.

To continue reading this article, head on over to our Ebook!

For other exclusive articles, visit www.equipment-news.com.

 

Check these articles out:

Cutting Costs, While Saving The Planet For Tool Makers

Nissan Teaches Robots To Make Replacement Parts For Cars

Kennametal Introduces KCS10B For Superalloy Applications Used In Aerospace

Sandvik Coromant Connected Driven Tool Holder Maximises Machine Utilisation

OMAX To Demonstrate Waterjet Precision At EuroBLECH 2021

Seco 335.18 And 335.19 Cutters Enable Smooth, Problem-Free Disc Milling

Doosan Machine Tools Partners With TITANS Of CNC

 

WANT MORE INSIDER NEWS? SUBSCRIBE TO OUR DIGITAL MAGAZINE NOW!

FOLLOW US ON: LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter

 

 

How To Quickly, Easily And Automatically Measure Radii And Defects

How to Quickly, Easily and Automatically Measure Radii and Defects

Highly specialised aerospace engine components such as turbine blades and discs or blisks involve a number of metrological challenges. Here’s how MTU Aero Engines are addressing them all. Article by Bruker Alicona.

The automatic measurement and evaluation of radii, chamfers and break edge on turbine engine components is one of many criteria in modern quality assurance at MTU Aero Engines. Currently three Cobot systems from Bruker Alicona are in use for break edge measurement. On top, the optical measuring solutions replace labor intensive replica techniques and tactile methods in defect measurement.

“If there’s a burr, this could become a danger point in the engine,” says Michael Duffek, inspection planner at MTU Aero Engines, and also responsible for quality assurance of turbine engine components. For the company, automated measurement and evaluation of edges, radii and chamfers of engine components is an important part of modern, state-of-the-art measurement technology.

Highly specialized components such as turbine blades, turbine discs or blisks (blade integrated disk) are measured, and they involve a number of metrological challenges. These include, for example, the complex geometry with steep flanks as well as varying reflection properties of the components. Different surface reflections occur due to varying manufacturing processes, as surfaces to be measured are either coated, and thus matt, or ground, and thus highly reflective.

For a suitable measuring system, this means that it must not only offer the required automation options including standard-compliant evaluation, but must also be able to measure complex, difficult-to-access geometries with tight tolerances and matt to reflective surfaces in high resolution and repeatability. A further requirement is the integration into a production process including integration into the existing IT environment.

“And the whole thing has to be fast and straightforward,” Duffek says. As a result, there are now 15 Bruker Alicona measurement systems in use at MTU locations worldwide, 11 of which are located at the test centers of the German headquarters in Munich. This is also where the automated measurement of turbine engine components takes place, which are implemented with measuring equipment from the Bruker Alicona Cobot line.

Combine an Optical 3D Sensor with a Collaborative Robot

Cobots are a combination of a collaborative 6-axis robot and a high-resolution optical 3D measurement sensor to be used for the automatic inspection of microgeometries on large components. In the aerospace industry, the measurement of deburred edges, also known as “break edge measurement”, on turbine disks and turbine housings are the most common applications. Bruker Alicona Cobots have been available on the market since 2017, and even then “nothing comparable has existed, at least we are not aware of any system. What the Cobot already offered three years ago at the market launch was unique. All the other manufacturers we evaluated would have had to start at the development stage,” Duffek recalls. He is now a ‘Cobot expert’ because under his leadership, three systems for the automated measurement of edges, radii and defects are currently in use in Munich.

To continue reading this article, head on over to our Ebook!

For other exclusive articles, visit www.equipment-news.com.

 

Check these articles out:

Integrated Quality Control Of Turbine Blades In An Automated Production Cell

FARO Launches Latest 3D Portable Gage CMM

CMM With Mass Technology: Versatility In Focus

API and COORD3 Partners For Industrial 3D Metrology Solutions

TÜV SÜD PSB Signs MoU With NUS For Medical Device Additive Manufacturing

Multi-Sensor CMM For Turbine Blades

3D Scanning Prevents Production Downtimes

Renishaw’s XM-60 Offers Easy Alignment For Stage Builders

 

 

WANT MORE INSIDER NEWS? SUBSCRIBE TO OUR DIGITAL MAGAZINE NOW!

FOLLOW US ON: LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter

 

 

 

FARO Acquires ATS AB To Accelerate In 3D Digital Twin Market

FARO Acquires ATS AB To Accelerate In 3D Digital Twin Market

FARO Technologies, Inc. has acquired Advanced Technical Solutions in Scandinavia AB (“ATS”), a Swedish-based leader in 3D digital twin solution technology.

The acquisition will integrate ATS software and proprietary Traceable 3D system, which enables highly accurate and repeatable 3D scans, into the FARO Webshare Cloud platform. ATS’ system connects the physical to the digital world and is expected to bolster FARO’s ability to improve customers’ time to decision with 10x faster 3D imaging at up to 1mm accuracy.

“We believe this acquisition enables FARO with differentiated accuracy and speed, which we believe will accelerate the adoption of digital twin technology. High accuracy 3D digital twin simulations allow capital intensive industries such as automotive and aerospace to meaningfully reduce their time to market and cost,” said Michael Burger, FARO President & CEO.

“I welcome the ATS team into FARO and believe they will help accelerate our strategic objective of increasing cloud based subscription offerings in this sizable market.”

Göran L. Bergqvist, ATS CEO, added, “The ATS team is thrilled to join a 40-year global leader like FARO.  FARO’s technology and market presence provides the spring-board to the market adoption of Traceable 3D.” Bergqvist, who co-founded ATS, will continue to lead the ATS operation. The ATS Swedish facility will also act as a Nordic sales and service center for FARO.

For other exclusive articles, visit www.equipment-news.com.

 

Check these articles out:

Smart Manufacturing Market to Reach US$573B By 2027

Doosan Robotics Launches New Cobots Including Support For Machine Tools

FARO Offers New Capabilities With CAM2 2020 Software

The versatile machine for large tasks

FARO Launches Latest 3D Portable Gage CMM

Sandvik President And CEO Bjorn Rosengren To Resign, Join ABB

FARO Completes Divestment of Dental, Photonics Businesses

 

WANT MORE INSIDER NEWS? SUBSCRIBE TO OUR DIGITAL MAGAZINE NOW!

FOLLOW US ON: LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter

 

 

3D Printing Metal Market To Be Worth $5.51 Billion By 2027

3D Printing Metal Market To Be Worth $5.51 Billion By 2027

The global 3D printing metal market size is projected to reach USD 5.51 billion by 2027, expanding at a CAGR of 27.8 percent from 2020 to 2027, according to a report by Grand View Research, Inc. Accelerating growth in the adoption of 3D printing for manufacturing of metal parts, especially for the aviation and healthcare industries, is the crucial factor driving the market.

Metal is a primary focus area in additive manufacturing (AM). Investments in metal AM have increased at a rapid pace in recent years. AM process offers exceptionally high-performance parts made from aluminum, steel, nickel, titanium, and others for demanding, high-value industries, such as medical and aerospace. These industries have observed faster penetration of AM on account of its ability to manufacture complex parts, decreased part weight, and material needs.

The 3D printing metal industry is witnessing growing demand from the aerospace and defense sectors owing to the rising capabilities to reduce aerospace part weight and focus toward improving overall efficiency, which otherwise proves costly and time consuming through traditional manufacturing process. The ability to print cheaper equipment in less time on demand is expected to be the key factor driving the industry.

The potential cost savings are stimulating the growth of the market in aerospace and defense. For instance, in November 2018, Lockheed Martin, U.S.-based global aerospace and defense company, announced that due to 3D printed parts, there was reduction in the price of its F-35 Full Mission Simulator (FMS) unit and has led to the savings of nearly USD 45.0 million.

North America accounted for the largest share in the utilisation of additive manufacturing metals for the aerospace and defense industry. Recently mandated policies of U.S. to increase the defense investment by significant levels are expected to bolster the regional market growth. Involvement of private players in space exploration projects is further expected to augment the market growth across the region.

For other exclusive articles, visit www.equipment-news.com.

 

Check these articles out:

Industry 5.0: The Future Of Manufacturing In 2035

COVID-19 Impact On Global Machine Tool Market

Frost & Sullivan: Digital Retailing And Vehicle Leasing To Propel Automotive Recovery Path

A Company At The Heart Of The Car Industry

TRUMPF And STMicroelectronics Partners For UWB Positioning Technology

Global Fibre Laser Market Forecast

Cloud-Edge And 5G Set To Propel Post-COVID-19 Value Creation

Empowering Manufacturing Transformation

 

WANT MORE INSIDER NEWS? SUBSCRIBE TO OUR DIGITAL MAGAZINE NOW!

FOLLOW US ON: LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter

 

 

Kennametal Introduces KCS10B For Superalloy Applications Used In Aerospace

Kennametal Introduces KCS10B For Superalloy Applications Used In Aerospace

Kennametal has introduced its newest turning grade, KCS10B, for nickel, cobalt and iron-based superalloys used in aerospace and other high temperature applications.

KCS10B, which features a revolutionary coating applied to an ultra-fine grain carbide substrate for superior layer adhesion, delivers up to 50 percent greater tool life, more predictable processes, and improved productivity when working with difficult to machine superalloys. KCS10B overcomes the most common challenges encountered in turning superalloys—cratering and depth-of-cut notching—two wear modes that often lead to unexpected and even catastrophic tool failure.

Special Sputtering

Rather than the light rain of droplets that fall on cutting tools during traditional PVD coating processes, Kennametal’s High-Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (High-PIMS) technology generates a fine mist of AlTiN, building a series of “extremely thin, smooth, and wear-resistant layers.”

Beating wear

Metals such as Inconel 718 and Stellite 31 are notorious for causing rapid wear and unpredictable tool life, KCS10B is proven to reduce DOC notching and extend tool life from three minutes to upwards of five minutes in roughing operations. Tool life in finishing operations fares even better, with visible cratering and subsequent tool failure often delayed by a factor of two or three compared to competitive brands.

For other exclusive articles, visit www.equipment-news.com.

 

Check these articles out:

Expertise In Grooving For Small Part Production

Bosch Cuts Back Operations In Response To Falling Automotive Demand

ISCAR Launches Chipformer For Finish Turning On Superalloys

Tungaloy Eliminates Coolant Hose Connections with TungTurn-Jet

TMTS 2020 Switched To A Virtual Event, With Next Exhibition Scheduled In 2022

Walter: Machining Titanium Quickly And Safely In Aerospace

GF Machining Solutions Form P 350 Die Sinking Electrical Discharge Machining

RADAN Powers Paradigm Shift To Digitally Focused “Web Shops”

 

WANT MORE INSIDER NEWS? SUBSCRIBE TO OUR DIGITAL MAGAZINE NOW!

FOLLOW US ON: LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter

 

 

[WATCH] APMEN Speaks On The Impact Of COVID-19 On ASEAN’s Metalworking Industries

[WATCH] APMEN Speaks On The Impact Of COVID-19 On ASEAN’s Metalworking Industries

In a webinar hosted by Taipei International Machine Tool Show (TIMTOS), Kenneth Tan, Publisher of Asia Pacific Metalworking Equipment News (APMEN) speaks about the impacts of the pandemic on ASEAN’s metalworking industries, including the automotive, and aerospace & MRO sectors and what we can expect in the post COVID-19 era.

Besides the ASEAN region, the webinar, organised by Taiwan External Trade Development Council (TAITRA), also addresses the impact of COVID-19 in the European and US markets. Other speakers include Gabriel Pankow, Head of Digital Editorial Office of mi connect and Michael Vaughn, Chief Consultant of Indiana Research Institute.

Watch the full webinar here:

For other exclusive articles, visit www.equipment-news.com.

 

Check these articles out:

LVD Launches Virtual Tech Summit For Metal Fabricators

What To Do With Your Coolant During Longer Production Stops?

Metals, Electronic Systems, External Manufacturing Slows Down Due To COVID-19

Taking metal to the cloud

ASEAN Vehicle Sales Down 19% In Q1 2020

Increasing Productivity And Quality Gains Through Digitalisation

 

WANT MORE INSIDER NEWS? SUBSCRIBE TO OUR DIGITAL MAGAZINE NOW!

FOLLOW US ON: LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter

 

Join Bruker Alicona Webinar: Form And Roughness Measurement With One System

Join Bruker Alicona Webinar: Form And Roughness Measurement With One System

Bruker Alicona is hosting a webinar on 25 June 2020 to demonstrate applications of the company’s measuring system solutions. Attendees will learn more about current applications in selected key markets such as medical technology, tooling and aerospace. Speakers include Dr. Martin Koller from the Clinical Department of Dental Medicine at the Medical University of Graz to explain how and why the InfiniteFocus optical measuring system is used.

Other applications that will be addressed are:

  • Medical technology: A customer from the medical technology sector uses the optical µCMMnot only for the measurement of high-gloss knee implants but also for the lateral probing of vertical surfaces (Vertical Focus Probing)
  • Tooling industry: IMCO, manufacturer of high-performance cutting tools, uses the Bruker Alicona EdgeMaster to measureshape and contour accuracy, rake angle, undercuts, chipping and roughness. Especially the easy handling of the system is an enormous advantage for IMCO.
  • Aerospace: MTU Aero Engines already has three Cobotsystems in operation for break edge measurement. For MTU, the automatic measurement and evaluation of radii, chamfers and break edge on turbine engine components is a criterion of modern quality assurance.

Click here and register for the webinar now!

 

For other exclusive articles, visit www.equipment-news.com.

 

Check these articles out:

The AMable Project Promotes Flexible AM Solutions To Fight The Coronavirus

Integrated Quality Control Of Turbine Blades In An Automated Production Cell

Aircraft Milled Parts Market To Reach US$4.3B In 2025

Smart Manufacturing Market to Reach US$573B By 2027

KASTO: The Intuitive Way To The Right Storage Space

MVTec Exhibits Embedded Vision Solutions At Embedded World

Flexible Gripping Delivers the Future of Automation Today

 

WANT MORE INSIDER NEWS? SUBSCRIBE TO OUR DIGITAL MAGAZINE NOW!

FOLLOW US ON: LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter

ASEAN Aerospace And MRO Industry In The Wake Of COVID-19

ASEAN Aerospace And MRO Industry In The Wake Of COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic has an unprecedented adverse impact on the aviation industry and, consequently, on the MRO business, without clear visibility on the timing of its recovery, according to Singapore-based SIA Engineering Co. Ltd. Border controls imposed by countries worldwide and the precipitous decline in travel demand has forced drastic cuts in flight capacities and grounding of aircraft.

In response to the worsening crisis, the International Air Transport Association (IATA) is projecting a more realistic U-shaped recovery for the air travel industry, with domestic travel coming back faster than the international market. 

Many expect that because of the impact of the pandemic, activity in the commercial aerospace market will take several years to return to the levels seen just a few months ago. Some players in the aerospace manufacturing industry, including Boeing and Rolls-Royce, have even announced workforce reduction and production cuts.

However, Boeing is seeing some green shoots. Some customers are reporting that reservations are outpacing cancellations on their flights for the first time since the pandemic started, while some countries and U.S. states are starting cautiously to open their economies again.

  • Boeing, in fact, has resumed production of the 737 MAX at the company’s Renton, Washington factory.
  • On 14 April 2020, IATA released an updated analysis showing that the COVID-19 crisis will see global airline passenger revenues drop by US$314 billion in 2020, a 55 percent decline compared to 2019. Airlines in Asia Pacific will see the largest revenue drop of US$113 billion in 2020 compared to 2019 (-US$88 billion in 24 March estimate), and a 50 percent fall in passenger demand in 2020 compared to 2019 (-37 percent in 24 March estimate).

According to Oliver Wyman:

  • As of late April, over 65 percent of the pre-COVID fleet of 27,500 commercial aircraft have been parked
  • The current trajectory for fleet reductions and lower aircraft utilisation would reduce global MRO demand in 2020 by over $48 billion, or 53 percent

Here’s an update of what has been happening in ASEAN’s aerospace and MRO industry amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Indonesia

  • Indonesia’s national airline, Garuda Indonesia, has resumed domestic flights starting May 7, 2020.
  • PT Garuda Maintenance Facilities (GMF) AeroAsia expects to see increasing demand for MRO services from non-affiliated international airlines and has projected an 80 percent y-o-y increase for MRO services, from 71 percent in 2019

Philippines

  • AirAsia is set to gradually resume services in the Philippines on June 5, 2020, following the Philippine government’s directive of easing community quarantine restrictions in Metro Manila and several parts of the country. The resumption of services will initially be for key domestic routes, and will gradually increase to include international destinations by July 1.
  • Air Carriers Association of the Philippines (ACAP), comprising: Philippine Airlines, Cebu Pacific and AirAsia Philippines, sees the industry shrinking in the next two years. The association has requested government assistance, including waiver of airport charges and credit guarantees
  • Infrastructure projects still ongoing: Lufthansa Technik and Metrojet Engineering

Thailand

  • Airbus withdraws from MRO joint venture with Thai Airways
  • Thai Airways has filed for bankruptcy protection to rehabilitate business (to restructure under the supervision of the local bankruptcy court). Will not resume its international flight operations until 30 June.
  • The proposed MRO project at the U-Tapao Airport will proceed as planned despite Thai Airways International (THAI) entering bankruptcy. The THB11 billion project has already been approved by the Cabinet and a contract is expected to be signed in June. (The Nation Thailand)

Singapore

85 percent of the Singapore industry is involved in maintaining and repairing aircraft. Singapore also plays a small but critical role in the global aerospace supply chain, with its SMEs having a key role in MRO and manufacturing—supporting special processes, tooling, testing, logistics, manpower, and other services. (Association of Aerospace Industries Singapore)

  • SIA has announced that it will resume flights to 27 destinations and increase no. flights for other services in June & July
  • Government has set aside S$750 million of support for the aviation sector and consolidation is expected to happen over the next 12 to 18 months.
  • Collins Aerospace, which just opened a 10,000 sq ft innovation hub in Singapore, is “monitoring the evolving market conditions very closely”. 
  • Rolls-Royce has scaled down its operations in its facility which tests Trent aero engines (Channel News Asia)
  • ST Engineering 
    • expects a slowdown in its aerospace unit due to deferred MRO services and lowered original equipment production rates 
    • however, the company has secured about $838 million across its spectrum of aviation manufacturing and MRO businesses
      • The MRO contracts included A320 heavy maintenance contracts and CFM56-7B engine maintenance contracts from Chinese airlines, and a component Maintenance-By-the-Hour (MBHTM) contract from a Southeast Asian airline to provide comprehensive component maintenance services for its entire fleet of Boeing 737 and Bombardier Q400. 
    • The Group is discussing with its customers to adjust delivery schedules or address order cancellations due to the evolving crisis. As at the end of 1Q, the Group’s order book remains robust.
  • BOC Aviation, a company involved in aircraft sales and leasing has extended its Engine MRO contract with Lufthansa Technik for another five years.
  • Through the enhanced Jobs Support Scheme (JSS), companies such as ST Engineering and SIA Engineering Company (SIAEC) will receive millions in additional wage support to cushion the devastating blow that COVID-19 has dealt the aerospace industry. (The Business Times)

Vietnam:

  • Suspended all international and most domestic flights in March and April in an effort to curb the spread of the coronavirus, domestic flights have resumed since April 22, after the government lifted a lockdown order, while international flights are expected to partially resume from June 1.
  • Will not consider applications for new airlines as it looks to prioritise the recovery of its aviation sector after the impact of the novel coronavirus, according to the Civil Aviation Authority of Vietnam (CAAV). (Bangkok Post)

 

For other exclusive news and information, visit www.equipment-news.com.

 

Check these articles out:

Share Your Insights: COVID-19 & Your Business

Developing Asia Growth To Fall In 2020 On COVID-19 Impact

COVID-19 Updates: Auto Makers Revving Up Production To Drive Market Recovery

ST Engineering Drops Dormant Subsidiary From Aerospace Arm

Siemens Workplace Distancing Solution Helps Manage ‘Next Normal’ Manufacturing

GE Aviation And SIAEC Establish Joint Venture

Growth Of Malaysia’s Aerospace Industry

ST Engineering’s Cybersecurity Solutions Gains Global Recognition

Global Aerospace 3D Printing Market Poised To Surpass $2,857 Million By 2024

 

WANT MORE INSIDER NEWS? SUBSCRIBE TO OUR DIGITAL MAGAZINE NOW!

FOLLOW US ON: LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter

 

 

 

Efficiency And Speed Make Kencoa Aerospace Machining Top Notch

Efficiency and Speed Make Kencoa Aerospace Machining Top Notch

Using CAD/CAM software has helped this aerospace parts manufacturer achieve increased efficiencies and shorter lead times. Article by Mastercam.

Efficiency and Speed Make Kencoa Aerospace Machining Top Notch

When Kencoa Aerospace began its operations 20 years ago, they were a small company focused on defense applications. But, according to Troy Boston, engineering manager for the company’s U.S.-based operations, they have also progressed into commercial aerospace over the past five to six years and consider themselves very diverse in terms of the parts they can machine for well-known clients such as Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Gulf Stream, and more.

While headquartered globally in South Korea, the U.S.-based aerospace operation is a Tier-1 supplier of multiaxis precision machined aerostructures, jet engine components, and major assemblies of commercial, military, and business/regional jets.

“We machine anything from plastics, stainless steel, titanium, all the way up to Inconel,” Boston says. He continued to explain that the part sizes they create can range from the size of a quarter up to 20-feet long. The majority of these parts are internal structural components for aircraft and can range anywhere from wing components to cargo floor skins. 

To create the parts needed for these defense and commercial aerospace clients, Kencoa turned to Mastercam CAD/CAM software (CNC Software Inc., Tolland, CT) for their machining solutions. Their 40,000 square-foot facility, based in Eastman, Georgia, employs 20 machinists, and of these, five are full-time programmers. Boston explained that their programmers have been trained through various methods, making each one valuable in different ways. Some have had formal programming training and classes, while others were formerly machine operators in their shop and worked their way to programmer. This prior experience helps as they can understand the machining side of the job. “We’ve been able to bring them in, and give them on-the-job training plus Mastercam tutorials, either online or print.”

All About the Software

The software allows these programmers to work on challenging orders including those with specifications that require holding close tolerances where their true position is 0.001 or a diameter that is ±0.0003” to 0.0010.” When presented with any manufacturing challenges, the software has helped with so many issues that it is hard for Boston to choose just one benefit it provides.

“What has impressed me over the last several years has been the OptiRough toolpath and how it has progressed and how easy it is to use. You can basically set the size of your stock, and even for a large hog-out, within a few minutes you can have a very good roughing program to be able to remove large amounts of material without a lot of programming time,” says Boston. 

This was a time-consuming process that required quite a bit of geometry creation and many separate toolpaths. OptiRough toolpaths use Dynamic Motion but in a more precise way. The cut uses the entire flute length of the tool, but a small percentage of the tool’s diameter on the first cut, followed by several successive shorter cuts that bring the part into the net shape desired. “Now, with the OptiRough program, you can select a part, select your stock, pick a tool, and it’s almost cheating to be honest, because it makes it so easy,” says Boston. 

Now, their machines can run aluminum upwards of 400-in/min. Even with titanium, they are able to run their machines at over 100-in/min. 

 

To continue reading this article, head on over to our Ebook!

For other exclusive articles, visit www.equipment-news.com.

 

Check these articles out:

Key To Success For Efficient And Cost-effective Product Manufacturing

10 Tips to Prevent Your CNC Machine From Standing Idle

APAC Demand For Machine Tools On The Upswing As Manufacturers Invest In New Production Facilities

New High-Definition Feature Scanner For Automated Inspection

Additive Manufacturing and Journey to Industry 4.0

NUM Launches Form Compensation Option For NUMROTO Tool Grinding Software

Hexagon Helps Manufacturing Professionals Access Smart Manufacturing Solutions At Home

Six Factors That Have Changed Bending Automation

How Digitalisation Is Transforming The Aerospace Sector

 

 

WANT MORE INSIDER NEWS? SUBSCRIBE TO OUR DIGITAL MAGAZINE NOW!

FOLLOW US ON: LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter

 

 

 

Back To Top