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Siemens Adds Augmented Reality To Solid Edge 2020

Siemens Adds Augmented Reality To Solid Edge 2020

Siemens Digital Industries Software’s Solid Edge 2020, the upgraded version of Solid Edge, features new functions such as augmented reality, expanded validation tools, model-based definition, and 2D Nesting. With these new functions, the software provides small and medium-sized manufacturing companies with next generation technologies to enhance collaboration and fully digitalise the design-to-manufacturing process.

Solid Edge 2020 delivers new augmented reality capabilities that enable users to visualise design intent in new ways, enabling enhanced collaboration internally, as well as with suppliers and customers during the design process. New and powerful validation tools have been integrated for conducting motion and vibration simulation, which can help customers reduce costly prototypes.

The addition of Model Based Definition enables customers to completely define parts, assemblies and manufacturing instruction digitally from their 3D model. 2D Nesting capabilities have also been added to optimise cutting patterns, reduce waste and costs, and accelerate manufacturing processes. Solid Edge 2020 also delivers hundreds of core CAD enhancements such as new sheet metal capabilities, almost 10x faster large assembly performance, new data migration tools, and others across the portfolio. These enhancements help facilitate a software application that is easy-to-use, deploy and maintain while also helping advance all aspects of the product development process.

“The new Model Based Definition offering for Solid Edge 2020 is exactly what we need,” said Daniel Froehlich, PLM Business Manager, Standardisation Department for Eagle Burgmann. “Not only will it help us go paperless, it’s a huge step toward moving to a completely digital environment. Using our digital model to create 3D PDFs will let us share our designs without having to create extra drawings.”

“The latest enhancements to the Solid Edge portfolio can help small to medium-sized manufacturers digitalise their entire product development process from end-to end,” said John Miller, Sr. Vice President, Mainstream Engineering at Siemens Digital Industries Software. “We continue to work on providing an advanced portfolio of affordable and easy-to-use tools to help our customers with their digital transformation, so they can reduce costs and accelerate product delivery.”

 

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Manufacturing Indonesia Launches With Industry 4.0 Focus

Manufacturing Indonesia Launches With Industry 4.0 Focus

Manufacturing Indonesia has launched today and aims at providing industry players with a better understanding of technologies behind industry 4.0 manufacturing. Occurring from December 5 to 8, 2018 at JI Expo Kemayoran, the event incorporats Machine Tool Indonesia, Tools & Hardware Indonesia, and Industrial Automation & Logistic Indonesia 2018.

Over 1,600 exhibiting companies from Canada, Germany, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Singapore, Taiwan, United Kingdom, USA, P.R. China, Sweden, will participate at the show which had previously attracted 34,000 trade attendees and industry leaders.

This year, an Industry 4.0 Showcase will be introduced and it will feature 9 major industry pillars including additive manufacturing, augmented reality, big data & analytics, cybersecurity, and autonomous robots.

“The essence of Manufacturing Indonesia is all about technology. The highlight is the Industry 4.0 showcase with the entire ecosystem of Industry 4.0 on display to uncover the potential of Indonesia’s smart manufacturing in the future. We strongly believe that growth is driven by technology and with it will enable manufacturers gain competitive edge through increased productivity. On this 32nd edition, we connect thousands of manufacturers together with technology and solution providers from over 28 countries and regions to support the “Making Indonesia 4.0” roadmap for a more efficient economy besides higher quality output in the industry sector,” said Maysia Stephanie, Project Director of Pamerindo Indonesia.

Indonesian Ministry of Industry has also initiated an industry 4.0 roadmap, Making Indonesia 4.0, earlier this year, which integrates industrial production and manufacturing with the new digital-based models in Indonesia. The goal of this initiative is drive the Indonesian economy into the top 10 rankings globally by 2030, which builds Indonesia’s current listing by the United Nations Industrial Development Organisation (UNIDO) as one of the world’s top 10 manufacturing industries.

A new feature this year is the co-location of Subcon Indonesia alongside the Manufacturing Indonesia 2018 Series of Exhibitions. Indonesia’s first subcontracting exhibition is held to provide a platform on opportunities for local subcontractors to present their capabilities in supporting market and industry needs. This is an effective way to bridge the gap between the machine makers and the end manufacturers which already exist and are actively present at the event across its various featured sectors.

Karnadi Kuistono, Chairman of Asosiasi Produsen Peralatan Listrik Indonesia (APPI) has also said that, “Indonesian manufacturing and electrical companies have followed International and Indonesian Standards (SNI) where production has been adapted to comply with required order or ready stock specifications. Although some materials and components for downstream industrial products are still imported, industrial and infrastructure projects can utilize on national design and engineering. This clearly will have a positive impact for national economic growth.”

Manufacturing Indonesia 2018 is a strategic converging point for all attendees with industry players and notable exhibitors including DMG Mori, First Machinery Trade Co, Jaya Metal, Kanematsu KGK, Mitsubishi Electric Indonesia, Somagede and Yamaha Motor Parts Manufacturing Indonesia.

Please visit www.manufacturingindonesia.com for more information.

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Stronger Public Private Partnership Required To Drive Industry 4.0 In Malaysia

Stronger Public Private Partnership Required to Drive Industry 4.0 in Malaysia

KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA: IDC believes that the 2019 Malaysia National Budget recently announced by Lim Guan Eng, the Finance Minister of Malaysia, was an important incremental step in achieving Malaysia’s vision to become a fully connected digital economy. The recent budget focused on the Industry 4.0 blueprint, titled “Industry4WRD”, which aims to make Malaysia the prime destination for high-tech industries in the region. The government plays a central role in the successful implementation of a robust Industry 4.0 strategy by creating clear policies and priorities to support the private sector. Initiatives like Industry4WRD focus the energy and creativity of the private sector around a common mission to create an era in which AI, robotics, 3D printing, and IoT will take centre stage and lead to digital transformation in Malaysia. IDC believes that direct support for Public-Private Partnerships (PPP) is necessary to focus Malaysia’s resources and boost the economic growth of the country.

The Malaysian government is continuing to adopt the necessary policy changes and budget priorities to strengthen the economic foundation for digital transformation and technology investments. For example, on November 7th, Malaysian Technology Development Corporation (MTDC) Sdn Bhd invited small and medium enterprises (SMEs) to embrace the fourth industrial revolution with the launch of the Centre of 9 Pillars (Co9P) initiative. This centre creates a physical location for ecosystem partners to interact for the development and incubation of solutions based on nine technology pillars including; Big Data Analytics, Autonomous Robots, Simulation & Augmented Reality, Horizontal & Vertical Integration, Internet of Things (IoT), Cybersecurity, Cloud, Additive Manufacturing and Supply Chain. IDC forecasts the size of the Big Data/Analytics investment in Malaysia will be $US670 million in 2019 led by the Banking industry while spend on IoT will be US$2.2 billion with the largest investment going into Manufacturing (2018 Big Data Spending Guide, 2018 IoT Spending Guide).

For almost a decade, IDC has been chronicling the emergence and evolution of the 3rd Platform of technology; the drive into Cloud, Mobility, Social and Big Data/Analytics technologies. The adoption of these technologies has accelerated as enterprises commit to the 3rd Platform and undergo Digital Transformation (DX) on a massive scale. Malaysia’s digital economy is in the early stages of creating an infrastructure with key core technologies (cloud, big data/analytics, artificial intelligence [AI], mobility, social business, robotics, internet of things [IoT], and 3D printing) for better public services and an economic boost. Rapid advances in cloud computing, connected devices, mobile, social media and data analytics are contributing to the growth of SMEs in Malaysia. SMEs constitute 98.5% of the total businesses and will spend US$2.7 billion on new technologies in 2019, according to IDC’s 2018 Small and Medium Business Spending Guide.

“The growth of digital economies is becoming an ever more impactful part of the global economy. The transition to a digital economy is a key driver of growth and development because it can provide a boost to the country’s productivity across all sectors and it creates an attractive environment for new investments from outside Malaysia. As the fourth industrial revolution becomes a key driver of the digital economy, entrepreneurs and SMEs need to assess fundamental aspects of their business, including what products and services they sell, how they deliver them to the market, the new skillsets required and how they need to organize to support their operations. Now is the time to take advantage of the new policies of the government and partner to accelerate new digital businesses,” said Randy Roberts, Research Director IoT and Telco, IDC Asia Pacific.

IDC strongly supports the new government’s plan to launch the National Fibre Connectivity Plan in 2019. This plan aims to develop broadband infrastructure to achieve a target of 30 Mbps speed per customer in rural and remote areas of the country within 5 years. This plan follows the implementation of the Mandatory Standard Access Pricing (MSAP) announcement from MCMC earlier this year that has successfully lowered broadband prices in order to connect more citizens to the digital economy.

“The high cost of a broadband connection in Malaysia has been one of the reasons small enterprises have delayed moving their business online. Government policies that improve the affordability, access and speed of broadband connectivity will increase the adoption of digital services and show the readiness of the economy to support digital initiatives” said Randy Roberts, Research Director IoT and Telco, IDC Asia Pacific.

IDC has documented examples of successful Public-Private Partnerships in the region, including Indonesia and Singapore, where the combination of public policy and entrepreneurship is driving the digital economy including smart city and mobile commerce services. In order to ensure the success of the digital initiatives in Malaysia, the government needs to consistently communicate the country’s digital priorities. The private sector should then follow with investment and development of resources in those areas, including development of key skillsets in the workforce to retain local talent.

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Accenture’s Research Report Provides Insights On Effective Digital Technology Adoption

Accenture’s Research Report Provides Insights On Effective Digital Technology Adoption

SINGAPORE: Accenture’s “Delivering Digital Dividends” report identifies value-gaps that organisations should address when adopting and implementing digital technologies. This research report builds on Accenture’s “Combine and Conquer” report from last year, which identified the best combinations of digital technologies to drive maximum business impact. “Combine and Conquer” calculated that companies that implemented those technologies effectively could boost their market capitalisation by 28 percent, on average.

The goal of this new research report is to help clients realise such gains by becoming what Accenture refers to as “Industry X.0” businesses which are defined as organisations that combine digital technologies to drive exceptional efficiency gains, create new, hyper-personalised experiences and enable new business models to drive both top and bottom line growth.

While the report focuses initially on five technologies (artificial intelligence (AI), augmented/virtual reality, big data, blockchain and robotics) found to be widely relevant and applicable across industries, it can be applied to a variety of other digital technologies, including mobile computing, 3D printing and digital twin, among others.

The report has dentified five broad areas related to technology implementation, referred to as “value-triggers,” along with a series of sub-elements for each trigger. The five value-triggers are:

  1. Value Potential. This focuses on the potential costs savings and gains in market cap value that the technology can deliver.
  2. Talent Readiness. This looks at both the existing workforce — in terms of the availability of talent and skills required for development, integration and maintenance of the technology — as well as the current demand and supply for talent with the specific technology skillset.
  3. Capital Adequacy. This considers the growth in venture capital investment, as well as the number of mergers and acquisitions related to the technology over the past three to five years.
  4. Ecosystem Maturity. This analyses the availability of widely accepted standards and protocols for the technology,efforts made to address interoperability challenges, the number of consortiums (academic and industry-specific) formed to advance the technology and the number of start-ups focused on advancing the technology.
  5. Adoption Intensity. This considers a variety of sub-elementssuch as the number of use case applications built using the technology, the number of use cases that have made it to commercial deployment, the estimated growth in technology spend, the number of companies investing in and/or developing the technology or related offerings and C-suite perception of the technology’s ability to improve efficiencies and deliver new experiences.

The value-triggers form the core of the Accenture Digital Dividends Diagnostic, a tool that measures the advancement of the technology against each of the value-trigger sub-elements on a scale of one to five. In which the smaller the number, the lower the advancement of that technology in the context of the particular sub-element of the value trigger. The value-trigger scores can be assessed for specific industries. This enables an enterprise to take necessary measures toward bridging value-gaps in the context of technologies adopted. For instance, a company adopting a technology with a low ‘Talent Readiness’ score can start investing to either build the necessary talent pool within its organisation or tap ecosystems to acquire the talent.

“When investing in a new technology, businesses often focus inward within their enterprise and ignore external factors — such as the available talent pool or industry investment in the technology — that could help them decide if the implementation of the technology is viable or feasible within their organisation,” said Raghav Narsalay, a managing director at Accenture Research, who led the Delivering Digital Dividends research. “The Digital Dividends Diagnostic we developed as part of our research takes the guesswork out of where the roadblocks to technology adoption might be and provides a clear understanding of what you will need to do to manage the implementation of the technology.”

The report notes that disregarding even a single value-trigger can be costly. For instance, the research found that companies that managed the ecosystem value-trigger particularly well are known as “ecosystem engagers”  and could achieve cost reductions per employee that were 2.4 percentage points greater, on average, than those of other companies. Therefore, for the three year period between 2013 and 2016, this translated to cost savings of US$844 million for the ecosystem engagers, on average.

“Given that nearly half of executives surveyed as part of last year’s ‘Combine and Conquer’ research cited an inability to combine rapidly evolving digital technologies as a key obstacle to successfully transforming their business, our new research should help ease their implementation concerns,” Narsalay said.

Aidan Quilligan, a managing director at Accenture and global lead of its Industry X.0 practice, said, “Executives don’t have to understand all the ins and outs of a technology to get the most value from it, but they must understand the broader business landscape around the technology. While there are many excellent frameworks for assessing the internal digitisation readiness of a company, until now you were on your own if you wanted to run an assessment of the external factors that might influence your digital transformation. Our Digital Dividends Diagnostic now makes this possible, providing a framework to help you get maximum value from digital technologies.”

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Transforming The Manufacturing Process Through Augmented Reality

Transforming the Manufacturing Process Through Augmented Reality

In the information-driven cyber-physical environment of Industry 4.0, the digital transformation of the manufacturing industry has brought on an interconnection between data, people, processes, services, systems, and production assets. With this, the volume, velocity, and variety of data that companies manage has increased exponentially. Known as ‘Big Data’, this information is crucial for companies looking to implement data-driven strategies to optimise their organization’s performance and efficiency, or increase their competitiveness. By Quah Beng Chieh, Head of Marketing (Asia Pacific), FARO Technologies

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