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Global Transition Towards Electric Vehicles Poses Major Challenges.

Global Transition Towards Electric Vehicles Poses Major Challenges.

It seems that not much has changed from the age of petrol-fueled vehicles to our current era of electric vehicles(EVs). Scientists are still grappling worldwide over the depleting availability of resources and the effective usage of those resources to meet the rising demand in the automotive industry.

By Ashwini Balan, Eastern Trade Media


General Motors earlier this year announced their commitment towards being carbon neutral, and added that by 2035, all their vehicles will consist of zero tailpipe emissions. Audi, another leading multinational automotive manufacturer, pledges to end the production of combustion-engine by 2033.

With these two market leaders taking the leap forward to an all-electric future, many multinational companies are overwhelmed with the pressure to quickly transition to EVs to maintain their competitive edge but more importantly, meet the rising consumer demand. Boston Consulting Group (BCG) analysis forecasts that by 2026, more than half of new passenger vehicles sold worldwide will be electric.

With the shift from fuel-intensive to material-intensive energy sources, there are two main concerns that scientists are struggling to resolve. Firstly, to reduce the usage of metal in batteries as it is scarce, expensive, environmentally toxic and working conditions hazardous to miners. Secondly, would be to create a recyclable battery system to maximise the utility of the valuable metals available.

Lithium-ion batteries are highly used in EVs due to their low cost which is 30 times cheaper than when they first entered the market in the early 1990s[1]. In addition, BNEF estimated that the current reserves of lithium— 21 million tonnes, according to the US Geological Survey — are enough to carry the conversion to EVs through to the mid-century.[2]  Hence, what concerns researches in EV batteries is Cobalt and Nickel.

In an attempt to address this issue, researches have been experimenting in removing both cobalt and nickel from the composition of EV batteries. However, to successfully remove them would radically transform the cathode materials. In recent years, Ceder’s team and other groups have displayed that certain lithium-rich rock salts were able to perform without the use of cobalt or nickel and yet remain stable in the process. In particular, they can be made with manganese, which is cheap and plentiful, Ceder says.[3]

To create a battery recycling system, another hurdle to overcome is the cost of recycling lithium. A potential solution would be through government support, which is seen in China where financial and regulatory incentives for battery companies are given to source materials from recycling firms instead of importing freshly mined ones, says Hans Eric Melin, managing director of Circular Energy Storage, a consulting company in London.

It is also problematic for manufacturers in their recycling efforts, when the chemistry of cathodes become obsolete at the end of the cars’ life cycle. In response to that, material scientist Andrew Abbott at the University of Leicester, UK developed a technique for separating out cathode materials using ultrasound. He adds that this method works effectively in battery cells that are packed flat rather than rolled up and can make recycled materials much cheaper than virgin mined metals.[4]

Scaling up the volume of lithium also aids in reducing the cost of recycling and this would make it economically viable for businesses to adopt it says Melin. The example of lead-acid batteries — the ones that start petrol-powered cars — gives reason for optimism.  “The value of a lead-acid battery is even lower than a lithium-ion battery. But because of volume, it makes sense to recycle anyway,” Melin says.[5]

With the collaborative effort among policymakers, researchers and manufacturers an all-electric future is an attainable reality.

References of Content:
Original Article Source: Davide Castelvecchi, 2021( https://t.co/amlXvXWs6E?amp=1 )

[1]  M. S. Ziegler & J. E. Trancik Energy Environ. Sci.2021

[2]  BloombergNEF. Electric Vehicle Outlook 2021 (BNEF, 2021)

[3]  Yang, J. H., Kim, H. & Ceder, G. Molecules 26, 3173 (2021)

[4] Lei, C. et al. Green Chem. 23, 4710–4715 (2021)

[5] Melin, H. E. et al. Science 373, 384–387 (2021).

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Shifting Gears: Addressing New Requirements In EV Manufacturing

Shifting Gears: Addressing New Requirements In EV Manufacturing

Andy Kuklinski of Ceratizit talks about the electric vehicle trend in the automotive industry, how it has changed the machining landscape, and the new requirements being faced by manufacturers. Article by Stephen Las Marias.

Andy Kuklinski

The Ceratizit Group develops and produces highly specialised cutting tools, indexable inserts, rods made from hard materials, and wear parts. Active in more than 80 countries worldwide, the Group has more than 8,000 employees and over 30 production sites. Its innovative hard material solutions are used in various sectors, including mechanical engineering and toolmaking, wood and stone working, in the automotive and aerospace industries, and in the oil, gas and medical industries.

In an interview with Asia Pacific Metalworking Equipment News, Andy Kuklinski, Head of Segment Automotive/Team Cutting Tools at Ceratizit, talks about the electric vehicle trend in the automotive industry, how it has changed the machining landscape, and the new requirements being faced by manufacturers.

HOW HAVE THE REQUIREMENTS IN ELECTRIC VEHICLES (EVs) CHANGED THE AUTOMOTIVE MANUFACTURING LANDSCAPE?

Andy Kuklinski (AK): One of the changes is that even more components will be made of aluminium. This will affect and change the manufacturing and supplier strategy. A typical example are cylinder heads and cylinder blocks. While these parts used to be manufactured mainly by the OEMs themselves, the focus is now moving to Tier 1 and even Tier 2 suppliers for the machining of the electric engine casing. We are increasingly seeing former aluminium foundries now responding and manufacturing the finished machined part in the same production facility. So, the landscape, especially the supply chain landscape, will definitely look different towards EV manufacturing.

WHAT KEY CHALLENGES HAVE YOU BEEN HEARING FROM YOUR AUTOMOTIVE CUSTOMERS WHO ARE TRANSITIONING TO EV?

AK: We are in constant exchange with our customers and hear again and again how challenging it is to react to the enormous and rapid changes in automotive components. In particular, the R&D and production planning departments are under great time pressure to meet the massively increasing demand for EVs. By supporting them quickly with the right machining concepts, we can mitigate at least some of this pressure.

HOW DO THESE CHALLENGES DIFFER FROM THE TRADITIONAL INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE VEHICLES?

AK: For one thing, the time pressure was much less with the combustion vehicles, since it was not necessary to renew large parts of the portfolio in a short period of time. The product cycles were very finely tuned. For another, the parts that are being created now, especially in the powertrain area, are completely different from the parts that car companies produced in the past—many things are still new and simply bring new challenges. Previous combustion engines were always developed in a similar way and always had the same contours and materials that people knew how to process. In many respects, it was a constant process of optimisation.

HOW ARE THESE CHALLENGES IMPACTING YOUR TECHNOLOGY/PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES?

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Operating In The Single-Digit Micron Range

Operating in the Single-Digit Micron Range

Peter Mösle of Blum-Novotest talks about the trends happening in the automotive manufacturing industry, and how the company has kept up with manufacturers’ new requirements.

Peter Mösle, Head of Sales of the Measuring Machines business division at Blum-Novotest, spoke about current challenges around post-process measuring technology and the structural changes in the automotive and supplier industry.

BLUM-NOVOTEST HAS BEEN MANUFACTURING POST-PROCESS MEASURING MACHINES FOR THE AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY SINCE 1983. HOW HAVE THE MARKET REQUIREMENTS CHANGED SINCE THEN?

Peter Mösle (PM): Our measuring machines are part of the production lines, so changes in the machining centres often impact our area of responsibility directly. In particular, the continuous reduction in cycle times, but also the ever-decreasing tolerances are challenges that we must solve. Where workshop drawings previously specified tenths or at most a few hundredths of a millimetre, today’s requirements are in the single-digit micron range. Another key aspect is repeatability, which means the ability to investigate the fifth or 5,000th workpiece in a reproducible manner. 

Ultimately, all these measured results must also be doc

umented with a link to the workpiece. Alongside these technical requirements, there is the need for high flexibility in terms of type diversity as well as a long and functionally reliable service life—all at the lowest possible purchase price. The advent of electric mobility means that the deck is being reshuffled.

HOW DOES ELECTRIC MOBILITY INFLUENCE THE REQUIREMENTS PLACED ON YOUR POST-PROCESS MEASURING MACHINES?

PM: Electric mobility generally results in a substantially lower number of parts. Whereas combustion engines can consist of 1,200 to 2,500 individual parts, electric drives frequently require roughly a mere 10 percent of this number.

Camshafts are a good example of this change. In recent years, they were developed from forged or turned components into what are called “assembled shafts”. With electric mobility, the shaft is retained as part of the rotor—without the cams but with other ultra-high-precision features that must be tested and evaluated. Even our most frequently delivered machines—brake disc measuring machines—must cater to changing requirements. As a consequence of the development of these components, we are confronted with innovative material combinations, coatings, or evaluation features, for which we have already delivered customer-specific solutions to expand our modular machine concepts.

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GlobalData: Thailand Automotive Production And Domestic Sales To Revive In 2021

GlobalData: Thailand Automotive Production And Domestic Sales To Revive In 2021

The Federation of Thai Industries (FTI) expects domestic car sales to decline by 5.3 percent in 2021, after a 21.4 percent slump in the previous year. Following this news, Bakar Sadik Agwan, Senior Automotive Consulting Analyst at GlobalData, offers his view:

“Thailand automotive production output and domestic sales followed downward trend in 2020. In line with GlobalData’s estimates, the country’s production output declined by 29.14 percent to 1.43 million units. The domestic sales also remained low with a 21.4 percent decline to 792K units compared to 2019. 2020 remained a bumpy ride for the Thailand auto industry, with January-July sales slipping down to 2008 levels and the auto production witnessing y-o-y decline for straight 10 months of the year. However, November and December showed signs of revival with y-o-y production and sales witnessing an increase, which is attributed to new car launches by automakers, attractive discounts and promotion campaigns and the financial stimulus by the government.

“Weak domestic and overseas demand amid the COVID-19 pandemic, major supply chain disruptions affecting production, massive slowdown in tourism sector, subdued economic growth and negative consumer sentiments remained major factors behind the production and sales de-growth in 2020. Some of these factors may further impact the production and sales in 2021 along with second wave of COVID-19 in domestic and some export markets, and ongoing chips shortages in the picture. FTI expects the vehicle production to reach 1.5 million units in 2021, marginally up compared to 2020. Thailand Board of Investment (BOI)’s new investment privileges and tax breaks to manufacturers are expected to support automotive production.

“Domestic demand in Thailand is anticipated to witness revival in 2021. However, volumes are expected to remain below 2020 levels. The government’s economic stimulus measures, growth in tourism, investment in infrastructure projects and government push for EV adoption are expected to boost automotive sales and support FTI’s projection of 750K vehicles sales in 2021, which will be a 5.3 percent decline y-o-y but significant improvement compared to 21.4 percent decline in 2020.”

 

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Hyundai $400 Million Innovation Center In Singapore To Revolutionise The Future Of Mobility

Hyundai $400 Million Innovation Center In Singapore To Revolutionise The Future Of Mobility

Hyundai Motor Group (the Group) is opening a $400 million Hyundai Motor Group Innovation Center in Singapore (HMGICS) set to be completed by the end of 2022. Located at the Jurong Innovation District, the 28,000 m2 center will act as an open innovation lab for the Group’s future mobility research and development, with the aim of revolutionising the future mobility value chain.

“HMGICS is a major step forward for Hyundai Motor. The facility is the first of its kind in the world. It will pave the way for more Korean companies to invest here, partner with local suppliers and SMEs, and collaborate with our universities and research institutes,” said Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong.

“Singapore’s goal is to have all our vehicles run on cleaner energy by 2040, in line with our Paris Agreement commitments. We hope this will open up new growth areas for our economy, and create exciting jobs for Singaporeans,” he continued.

“Hyundai Motor Group Innovation Center in Singapore will strive for ‘Human-Centered Value Chain Innovation for a Mobility Paradigm Shift.’ We will offer products and services tailored to customers’ needs,” said Hyundai Motor Group Executive Vice Chairman Euisun Chung. “I am confident the innovations that spring from HMGICS will shape our future global society for the better and       contribute to the progress of humanity.”

In future, customers will be able to customise and purchase vehicles online using a smartphone, which will immediately start production using Hyundai’s on-demand technology. The customers can then watch their car being manufactured at HMGICS. Once the car is ready for delivery, it will be transferred to the 620-meter-long Sky Track where customer can test drive the vehicle.

The center will also act as a test bed for a human-centered intelligent manufacturing platform with small scale EV production facility on site. The facility will utilise the latest ‘Industry 4.0’ smart technologies, such as artificial intelligence (AI), Internet of Things (IoT) and robotics. The logistics and assembly lines within HMGICS will be highly automated to establish a safe and efficient work environment. The Group will also test versatile systems that produce multiple models, to respond efficiently to fast changing market environments.

The collaboration will go beyond the Group and into the Singaporean innovation ecosystem. Singaporean universities, startups and research institutes, including Nanyang Technological University, Singapore – the first local academic research partner – will be able to collaborate through the open innovation lab.

“Hyundai is a strategic partner in our effort to address future mobility needs through innovation and advanced manufacturing technologies. The Hyundai Motor Group Innovation Centre will introduce important new capabilities in areas such as electric vehicles and urban air mobility, and create new opportunities for Singaporeans. This will complement the vibrant base of companies that are involved in the development of autonomous driving and electrification technologies,” said Dr. Beh Swan Gin, Chairman, Singapore Economic Development Board (EDB).

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Why Porosity Sealing Is Key To Delivering Next-Generation EVs

Why Porosity Sealing is Key to Delivering Next-Generation EVs

Dr. Mark Cross of Ultraseal International explores the role of vacuum impregnation when implementing zero waste, zero defect and continuous improvements in hybrid and electric vehicle manufacturing.

Fast-cycle times increase throughput for both single and multi-part processing.

With the world focused on finding sustainable, low-carbon solutions for travel, the move to hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) and battery electric vehicle (BEV) adoption is well underway. 

According to a study by Boston Consulting Group, EV sales (mild hybrid, full hybrid, plug-in hybrid and full battery-electric vehicles) are expected to surpass internal-combustion-engine (ICE) vehicle sales by 2030, taking 51 percent of the market, with BEV and PHEV (plug-in hybrid electric vehicle) categories accounting for 25 percent of total vehicle sales. However, 82 percent of cars will still contain an ICE powertrain, with PHEVs, HEVs and mild hybrids all using internal combustion engines alongside their electric powertrain.

Automotive manufacturers are under pressures from many sides. On the consumer side, there is a sharp drop in confidence in diesel due to the introduction of clean air zones, some of which are already in force, and a ban on internal combustion engine vehicles in the UK by 2035.

Meanwhile, governments around the world are tightening up on automotive emission legislation. In Europe, there are increasingly stringent CO2-emission regulations. In China, efficiency is paramount, with their ever-stricter Corporate Average Fuel Consumption (CAFC) and New-Energy Vehicle (NEV) regulations testament to that.

To meet these regulations and consumer needs, car makers are gearing up to launch a wave of new electric vehicle (EV) models during 2020. Many EVs on the market in recent years have been targeted at high-end markets with a price tag to match. However, 2020 will see the launch of EVs which are much more familiar and accessible to the average driver, including the MINI, the Vauxhall Corsa, the Fiat 500 and the Volkswagen ID.3 and e-Up! being just a few to mention.

There’s no doubt that significant advances have already been achieved in hybrid and BEV manufacturing in recent years. However, while these vehicles offer a greener alternative during operation, it is increasingly important that the engineering and manufacturing process behind them is also environmentally sustainable.

The Role of Vacuum Impregnation in Automotive Manufacturing

With vehicle weight having an adverse effect on battery usage, hybrid and BEV manufacturers are increasingly looking at ways to reduce overall vehicle mass. The use of structural die cast components can help – especially if manufacturers opt to substitute materials, such as steel, with lightweight materials like aluminium. By manufacturing drive and powertrain components, such as electric motors, from die cast aluminium, car makers can further reduce vehicle weight. In turn, battery range can be extended for BEVs and HEVs, while reducing vehicle emissions for the latter as well.

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Mazda And Toyota Joint Venture Commits Additional $830 Million To Cutting-Edge Manufacturing Technologies

Mazda And Toyota Joint Venture Commits Additional $830 Million To Cutting-Edge Manufacturing Technologies

Mazda Toyota Manufacturing, (MTM), the new joint-venture between Mazda Motor Corporation and Toyota Motor Corporation, has announced an additional $830 million investment to incorporate more cutting-edge manufacturing technologies to its production lines and provide enhanced training to its workforce of up to 4,000 employees.

Total funding contributed to the development of the state-of-the-art facility in US is now $2.311 billion, up from the $1.6 billion originally announced in 2018. The investment reaffirms Mazda and Toyota’s commitment to produce the highest-quality products at the facility. It also accommodates production line enhancements made to improve manufacturing processes supporting the Mazda vehicle and design changes to the yet to be announced Toyota SUV that will both be produced at the plant.

The new facility will have the capacity to produce up to 150,000 units of a future Mazda crossover vehicle and up to 150,000 units of the Toyota SUV each year. MTM continues to target up to 4,000 new jobs and has hired approximately 600 employees to date, with plans to resume accepting applications for production positions later in 2020.

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China’s Changzhou National Hi-Tech District Renews Partnership With ThyssenKrupp

China’s Changzhou National Hi-Tech District Renews Partnership With ThyssenKrupp

German multinational conglomerate ThyssenKrupp recently renewed its partnership with Changzhou National Hi-Tech District (CND), in Changzhou, representing its fifth investment in the Chinese city in five years.

ThyssenKrupp decided to move forward with an additional investment of US$200 million to build a global automotive electronic power steering (EPS) system facility in the district. As one of the world’s top 500 firms, ThyssenKrupp is the result of the merger of Thyssen and Krupp and has established its leadership in the steel refining sector, as well as the automotive parts and elevator manufacturing sectors.

With a focus on the high-tech manufacturing of automotive parts, the German conglomerate invested 25 million euros five years ago to set up ThyssenKrupp Steering System (Changzhou) Co., Ltd.

The conglomerate’s fifth investment in Changzhou will focus on the R&D and production of the world’s most advanced automotive EPS systems, which will vastly reduce the energy consumption of electric vehicles, giving drivers and passengers a better experience, while empowering unmanned driving technologies. Despite the negative effect that the current international economic situation and the COVID-19 pandemic are having on international economic cooperation, ThyssenKrupp remains upbeat about the prospects in China.

ThyssenKrupp’s manufacturing facilities in Changzhou have delivered increasingly exciting results, evidenced by sales from the Changzhou facilities growing 48.9 percent year on year in 2017, followed by a growth rate that advanced 85.9 percent in 2018 and 36 percent in 2019. ThyssenKrupp Presta Steering Asia Pacific Chief Operating Officer Chen Min commented after the signing ceremony that thanks to CND’s favorable business environment and the five investments in Changzhou over a five-year period, China promises a brighter future for the company.

The registered capital of ThyssenKrupp’s manufacturing facilities in Changzhou has reached approximately 900 million yuan. Chen Min said: “Looking forward, Changzhou’s facilities will become our largest steering system manufacturing base around the world and their combined annual sales are expected to double to some 5 billion yuan in three to five years.”

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Global Auto Sales In The Wake Of COVID-19

Global Auto Sales In The Wake Of COVID-19

IHS Markit has downwardly revised its forecasts for global light vehicle sales and production as the impact COVID-19 impact has depressed demand.

According the new analysis, global light vehicle sales are now forecast to be 69.6 million units this year in the wake of the pandemic. IHS Markit forecasts a similar decline for global light vehicle production, falling to 69.3 million units.

Auto sales forecast to drop 22.0 percent, with risk for further deterioration

Impacts to global auto demand in the wake of COVID-19 have rapidly progressed to severity levels higher than the 2008-2009 recession, and significant uncertainty around prospects for a meaningful recovery remain. Global light vehicle sales in 2020 are now forecast to drop to 69.6 million units, 22.0 percent lower than in 2019, with risks to the forecast still skewed to the downside.

“The pandemic remains a clear and present danger to the autos sector, with months of uncertainty expected to cloud hopes for global recovery prospects,” said Colin Couchman, executive director, global autos demand forecasting at IHS Markit. “The expected cycle of decline, stabilisation and recovery for autos varies by market, reflecting variations in containment strategies and policy responsiveness,” he said.

In recent weeks, Mainland China is seeing green shoots of recovery, while much of the rest of the world remains in lockdown. The IHS Markit forecast for Greater China sales in 2020 sees volume at 21.4 million units, a drop of 15 percent from 2019 levels. Though government incentives could help underpin a more orderly recovery profile, these are not yet indicated. Nearly all dealers are back to work and there are signals of an uptick in showroom traffic, but consumer confidence remains fragile. We may see a first-in, first-out phenomenon in China, and auto demand could bottom out midway through 2020 and begin to recover in the second half of the year. In 2021, volume could recover to 23.2 million units, based on current forecasts.

In Europe, COVID-19 lockdowns remain firmly in place for Italy, Spain, France and the UK, though show signs of easing in Germany. Prior to the pandemic, Europe had already faced uncertainty on the CO2 fleet target timetable and UK and European Union trade talks. Europe will see mixed recovery cycles, as a result of local restrictions and varied economic support and stimulus. Planning is further plagued by varied containment restrictions across the region, and recovery strategies are a work in progress. The forecast is for Europe to see sales fall 24.6 percent to 15.5 million units.

North America is forecast to see sales drop 26.7 percent y/y in 2020. In the U.S. a consumer-led recession looks inevitable for 2020 and autos face a bleak demand slump. There is no national consistency on rules relative to sales activity or duration for stay-at-home orders; there remains risk of another increase in infections, which could result in another wave of state or local-level restrictions, changing the dynamic again. IHS Markit expects that the known monetary and fiscal measures are not enough to prevent a collapse in auto sales, and in 2020, the U.S. market sales forecast is 12.5 million units.

Production expected to reflect demand levels

Affected first by stay-at-home orders in effort to contain the virus and then by expected weak demand, global light vehicle production is now expected to drop to 69.3 million units in 2020 – a 19.6-million-unit decline from 2019, according to the latest IHS Markit forecast.

Though production remains essentially shuttered in Europe, North America and South America, China has resumed. For shuttered regions, automakers are developing production re-start plans, factoring in production/capacity implications relative to instituting social distancing, various virus testing options and providing personal protective equipment (PPE). Global automakers can take best practices and lessons learned from re-starting in China to other markets, though are still restricted by local economic restrictions and consumer demand.

The primary driver of the latest outlook for Greater China includes delayed and sluggish resumption of operations in the Hubei province. Output is forecast to drop to 20.9 million units in 2020, compared with 24.7 million in 2019. Further, for many European OEMs in China, the comprehensive spread of the COVID-19 pandemic in Europe may create shortage of key components and bottlenecks in China production. Similar risks for Japanese OEMs in China exist as well, as facilities for semiconductors and other components have been shut down in the ASEAN region in recent weeks. Despite modest improvement in the pace of production in the summer, demand is expected to remain low given the broader global macroeconomic conditions.

In Europe, expectations for declines in production are broad-based, impacting essentially all OEMs in the region as plants have been shuttered to comply with mandated lockdown measures. With regard to restarting production, a mixed picture is emerging with some plants resuming production in late April and others extended to early May – all under a fairly slow, methodical ramp-up scenario. The deterioration in the macroeconomic outlook and the broad COVID-19 containment measures have resulted in material reductions in the demand outlook. Production is forecast to drop to 15.9 million units, compared with 21.1 million in 2019.

In North America, IHS Markit forecasts further deterioration relating to the COVID-19 crisis and its impacts on U.S. auto sales. The 2020 forecast reflects a nine-week shutdown across the region with production for most plants expected to resume beginning the week of May 18. April production is projected at roughly 4,300 units, marking the lowest monthly production level since 1945, following the end of World War II. Production is expected to return at a gradual pace with reduced shifts and continue to ramp-up through the second quarter of 2020. Further, the forecast reflects manufacturers utilising summer shutdowns to assess inventory and demand, making additional plant adjustments to ensure worker safety and resuming maintenance and retooling efforts where needed. The latest IHS Markit forecast sees North American production dropping to 12.2 million units, from 16.3 million in 2019.

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UMW Holdings Contributes RM1.3 Million To Fight Covid-19 Including Internally Produced PPE

UMW Holdings Contributes RM1.3 Million To Fight Covid-19 Including Internally Produced PPE

UMW Holdings Berhad has contributed essential Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) to be distributed to several Malaysian hospitals tasked with the screening and treatment of COVID-19 patients.

A total of 15,000 disposable headscarves, 10,000 gowns and 3,000 boot covers, all of which were produced internally at the Toyota Boshoku UMW manufacturing plant in Bukit Raja, Klang, will be distributed to hospitals, where PPE are essential in keeping healthcare workers safe. In order to distribute the PPE effectively, 7,000 disposable headscarves, 7,000 gowns and all boot covers will be delivered directly to the Ministry of Health, while the remaining 8,000 disposable headscarves and 3,000 gowns will be disbursed via NGOs such as the St John Ambulance of Malaysia.

Previously, on 15 April 2020, UMW Holdings had distributed 3,000 face shields to the Pusat Perubatan Universiti Malaya, Hospital Canselor Tuanku Muhriz UKM and Jabatan Kesihatan Kuantan, Pahang. The Group’s staff continues to produce the face shields internally in Shah Alam, targeting a total of 10,000 pieces.

UMW Holdings have also contributed blood pressure monitors, oximeters and stethoscopes to Hospital Sungai Buloh, besides previously collaborating with various reputable NGOs, such as MERCY Malaysia and Yayasan Food Bank Malaysia, to provide financial and livelihood support to various communities directly affected by the pandemic. Furthermore, UMW Holdings is part of the GLC Disaster Response Network, contributing ventilators and other vital medical equipment. In total, UMW Holdings Berhad has contributed RM1.3 million in aid to help fight the effects of COVID-19 on Malaysians.

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