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Renewed Competition Between Airbus And Boeing To Fuel Commercial Aircraft Production Growth In 2019

Renewed Competition Between Airbus And Boeing To Fuel Commercial Aircraft Production Growth In 2019

The revival of competition between Boeing and Airbus is expected to result in record delivery of the highly popular narrow-body platforms and a 9.4 percent year-on-year growth in the global commercial aircraft production in 2019. Boeing and Airbus will produce more than 1,750 aircraft this year, up from 1,606 units in 2018, and propel the market towards $258.95 billion, according to a new report from market analyst Frost & Sullivan.

Boeing will receive a boost once it finalises its deal for Embraer’s airliner business in 2019 to counter Airbus’s acquisition of Bombardier’s C Series programme; it will continue to develop its new mid-market aircraft (NMA) platform and position itself for growth in next-generation markets.

“Aircraft OEMs and suppliers will continue to focus on digitalisation of platforms for streamlining flight operations, planning and scheduling, sales and distribution, marketing, disruption management, and technical operations,” said Timothy Kuder, research analyst, Aerospace & Defence, at Frost & Sullivan. “Top aerospace companies as well as entrants are investing in R&D centred on electrical propulsion, generation, distribution, storage, and conversion.”

Kruder said Asia-Pacific will experience the highest growth in terms of aircraft deliveries and will sustain this position in the future. However, North America and Europe will continue to be the largest suppliers of aircraft. “In terms of technologies, advanced composite materials, additive manufacturing, and electrification will disrupt the design and construction of platforms, while digitalisation of aviation has already evolved into a $1.5 billion business,” he said.

For additional growth opportunities, aircraft suppliers and MRO facilities are expected to look to adopt digital technologies like blockchain, which can contribute to the mandated traceability requirements of many aerospace digital services; develop technologies such as fibre metal laminate (FML); seek opportunities to be vertically integrated with suppliers and OEM; and prepare for the servicing of next-generation airframes and engines.

 

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Creaform 3D Scanner Meets Boeing’s Quality Requirements

Creaform 3D Scanner Meets Boeing’s Quality Requirements

Creaform’s HandySCAN 3D metrology-grade 3D laser scanner can now be used for recording physical attributes of aircraft dents and blends on all models of Boeing commercial airplanes.

In a service letter released by Boeing on the guidance on use of 3D scanners for measuring dents and blends on airplanes, the SmartDENT 3D solution and the HandySCAN 3D scanner were used in the process of guiding Boeing’s quality requirements.

The SmartDENT 3D is 80 times faster than the pit gauge technique. It is the fastest and most reliable aircraft surface damage inspection tool available on the market; accurate to 0.025mm; and has a resolution of up to 0.1mm with high repeatability and traceable certificate. Weighing less than a kilo, the handheld scanner is the perfect tool for work in hangars or directly outdoors. Users can easily perform 3D surface inspection of any part of an aircraft on which they would use manual techniques—including on and under wings.

In addition to complying with Boeing’s service letter, Creaform HandySCAN 3D scanners are listed in the Airbus Technical Equipment Manual, which is referenced in its Structure Repair Manual.

 

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Boeing Portland Partners Haimer At OMIC R&D

Boeing Portland Partners Haimer at OMIC R&D

The Oregon Manufacturing Innovation Center Research and Development (OMIC R&D) continues to grow a strong membership base with the addition this month of Haimer , a world market leading German tooling company in the field of tool holding, shrinking, balancing and presetting. With a total now of seventeen manufacturing industry partners and three Oregon public universities, the Scappoose, Oregon (USA) based R&D facility continues to build a world-class operation to develop advanced metals manufacturing technologies through its collaborative research and development activities. Through this partnership, Boeing — with its center of excellence and main production plant for heavy metal machining in Portland, Oregon — is intensifying its strategic partnership with Haimer by sponsoring a joint membership at OMIC R&D. The partnership between Boeing and Haimer reaches back more than 10 years when Haimer ’s Safe-Lock pull out protection system became a true game changer at Boeing.

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Could The Autonomous Plane Tech Race Change The Aviation Industry?

Could The Autonomous Plane Tech Race Change The Aviation Industry?

Worldwide: Plane manufacturers including Airbus and Boeing are aiming to develop artificial intelligence that could one day mean teaching computers to fly planes autonomously.

Currently, commercial flights commonly have at least two pilots in the cockpit—a common practice for several decades. As such, completely autonomous planes might be some time away.

Chief technology officer of Airbus Paul Eremenko has said that the company is developing autonomous aircraft and technologies that will allow a single pilot to operate commercial jetliners.

“The more disruptive approach is to say maybe we can reduce the crew needs for our future aircraft. We are pursuing single-pilot operation as a potential option and a lot of the technologies needed to make that happen have also put us on the path towards unpiloted operation,” said Mr Eremenko in a recent interview with Bloomberg Television.

In addition to autonomous aviation technology being in its preliminary stages, there is also currently no aircraft certified for a single pilot or pilotless flight. Passengers (or their insurers or carriers) might also prove hesitant to accept such technology.

The company is also exploring technologies that will bring more automation to the cockpit of planes that could help resolve the shortage of pilots. This is especially important in emerging markets such as China, which is on track to become the world’s biggest aviation market in less than a decade. Mr Eremenko added that discussions are being held with Chinese companies such as Baidu to find ways to apply self-driving vehicles to the aviation industry.

With an estimated 637,000 pilots needed to fly commercial aircraft globally in the next two decades according to Boeing, Mr Eremenko said that the industry needs to find ways to produce more cockpit crew as only 200,000 pilots have been trained since the start of the aviation industry.

The aerospace industry is seeing a similar trend as the car market, where automakers are investing in or acquiring autonomous driving companies. The venture arm of aircraft manufacturer Boeing, HorizonX, recently acquired Near Earth Autonomy and Aurora Flight Sciences, which specialise in self-driving vehicle technology and autonomous aircraft systems respectively.

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