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Igus GmbH Launches An Online Tool With Drive Technology Configuration.

Igus GmbH launches an online tool with drive technology configuration.

Finding a compatible linear module for your application is certainly a difficult task. Lead screw, gear rack or toothed belt drive? Miniature or heavy-load axle? Motor or hand wheel? There are multiple configurations that one needs to consider before ordering and it is time-consuming.


Igus Gmbh’s latest creation, the drylin drive technology configurator offers the solution to your problem. Igus GmbH is a leading international manufacturer of energy chain systems and polymer plain bearings. Igus conducts the industry’s largest test laboratories yielding innovations and solutions tailored to their clients’ needs.

This newly available online tool uses application data such as installation position, load, stroke length, etc to customise the product accordingly to the client’s requirements providing as well, its service life. There is also the option to further equip the module as preferred by the client with accessories such as the motor and control system. Hence, this drive technology offers a comprehensive choice at your fingertips. “By displaying and selecting only compatible products, we give the user confidence that they will get a linear module that be connected right away”, says Michael Hornung, igus GmbH’s International Product Manager for drylin.

Furthermore, there is price included in the filtering process which allows users to immediately consider the options that fit their budget. On the final page, the configuration input into the system can be stored or forwarded, parts list and technical information downloadable, and linear modules ordered with a mouse click.

Most importantly, the online tool is available without any cost to the users.” With the help of our test data from our in-house laboratory, we can make a lifetime statement for each linear module as well as the motor load in the individual application and display them online. The customer can be sure that the module will work reliably and maintenance-free in the machine and system”, says Hornung.

Try the new drive technology configurator yourself:

https://drylin-drive-technology-configurator.igus.tools/requirements?l=en&c=DE

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First Mitsui Seiki Blue Arc Machine Installed At Aerodyn Engineering

First Mitsui Seiki Blue Arc Machine Installed At Aerodyn Engineering

Mitsui Seiki has produced the first commercial CNC machine tool that incorporates the Blue Arc HSEE (High Speed Electro Erosion) material removal process technology that is exclusively licensed by General Electric. The first “HW63TD BA” machine has been installed at Aerodyn Engineering, Indianapolis, IN. There, the two companies – Aerodyn and Mitsui Seiki – are partnering on multiple process development applications for their existing and prospective customers in aerospace, outer space, mold and die, power generation, oil and gas, and other critical component industries.

Fundamentally, Blue Arc HSEE is a non-conventional rough machining process utilising a controlled thermal metal removal method using a high-speed beam of electrons to erode and remove metal, driven by an electrical pulse between a tool electrode and a workpiece. Where EDM delivers a single point of material discharge, Blue Arc generates a multiple point discharge event resulting in rapid material removal. Blue Arc technology eliminates the need for high-powered spindles, highly engineered cutting tools, and reduces wear on the machine kinematics. It is known to be an extremely efficient roughing metal removal method for hard, difficult to machine alloys, such as nickel and titanium alloys as well as stainless and tool steels. Certain alloy components are being rough machined in a fraction of the conventional milling time and with less stress on the machine as Blue Arc is a non-contact method. The process can cut machine-tool capital costs by 30 percent or more and cutting tool costs by 70 percent, according to the company.

“We are excited to have the revolutionary Blue Arc technology in our facility to continue its development and showcase its remarkable benefits to manufacturers of hard metal parts,” said Robb Hudson, president and CEO of Aerodyn Engineering.

Providing more details about the specific Blue Arc machine installed at Aerodyn, the Mitsui Seiki HW63TD BA machine is a high performance 5-axis machining center platform featuring a standard CAT50 spindle. Basic specifications include an X, Y, Z axes work envelope of 1000mm (39.38”) in X and 850mm (33.46”) in Y and Z. The B and C rotary axes are driven at speeds of 60 and 90 rpm respectively. The machine also includes Fanuc drive motors and a Fanuc F30iM-B control system.

Mr. William (Bill) Malanche, COO of Mitsui Seiki USA, said, “There is a solid team in place at Aerodyn that is solely dedicated to the Blue Arc initiative. Both Robb Hudson and Cameron Perkins were both heavily involved in the development of the process and the machine with our company and GE when they were on staff at Mitsui Seiki. They have a deep understanding that will serve customers well to determine the optimal and most efficient applications for Blue Arc. From Mitsui Seiki’s perspective, having the BA machine installed at Aerodyn makes perfect sense for all involved, and it’s a thrill to see the machine ready, willing, and able to take on suitable projects.”

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ANCA ToolDraft –The Ultimate Drafting Package For Cutting Tools

ANCA ToolDraft –The Ultimate Drafting Package For Cutting Tools

Like all manufactured parts, cutting tools require technical drawings to make a design a reality. Best practice for cutting tool manufacturers emphasises the importance of a tool drawing that is detailed, clear and precise. Tool drawings are essential for many reasons – besides serving as a reference for operators to produce tools accurately and consistently, they also provide a record of the tool and enable revision control. Drawings are also predominantly used when recommending designs to customers for quoting purposes.

ANCA CNC Machines considered all the above when creating ToolDraft, which has allowed cutting tool manufacturers to achieve outstanding results. As a dedicated software package for producing 2D cutting tool drawings, ToolDraft helps users to reduce hours of workflow into a few clicks. Once a tool is created using ToolRoom (version 2016 or later) or CIM3D (version 8.1 or later), it can be sent to ToolDraft in a matter of seconds, with a click of the icon. Cutting tool manufacturers who have a backlog of tools not yet drawn will benefit greatly from ToolDraft and its ability to produce detailed 2D cutting tool drawings in minutes rather than hours.

Simon Richardson, ANCA Product Manager, said, “ToolDraft is quick, easy to use and saves time as it allows complex geometries that are difficult to draw to be simply created and dimensioned. As the software is specifically designed for cutting tools, it offers features that 2D CAD software may not have. Time saved using ToolDraft will provide a quick return on investment for any company looking to find efficiency in their production.”

ToolDraft follows Geometric Dimension and Tolerancing (GD&T) and ISO standards. Included in the software is a library of drafting symbols, feature control frames and annotations for GD&T purposes. Dimensions can be applied to a range of various tool views and customised, if required. Leader lines with text can be placed on to a drawing to describe unique features and information. In cases when a small section of geometry needs to be highlighted, multiple detailed tool section views can be added to the drawing. ToolDraft also has the capability to add cross section views chosen by the user anywhere along the axial position of the tool.

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Doosan Machine Tools Partners With TITANS Of CNC

Doosan Machine Tools Partners With TITANS Of CNC

Doosan Machine Tools is pleased to announce a new strategic partnership with TITANS of CNC, Inc. As part of this partnership, Doosan Machine Tools will become the exclusive premier machine tool builder partner for TITANS of CNC.

TITANS of CNC is focused on being the top global manufacturing education provider, and over the past few years, has reshaped the way manufacturing education is approached and delivered.

“My team and I are extremely excited to partner with Doosan Machine Tools,” stated Titan Gilroy, CEO of TITANS of CNC.  “They are a global leader in machine tool technology and are trusted by companies all around the world. Together we will close the skills gap and train machinists to produce real parts, allowing them to compete at the highest level.”

For over 40 years, Doosan Machine Tools has been supporting the manufacturing industry with high performance CNC machine tools. Doosan Machine Tools shares TITANS of CNC’s passion for educating manufacturing professionals,” stated Jim Shiner, Doosan Machine Tools America’s Vice President of Sales & Marketing. “The need for trained machinists is greater now than ever, and in our new partnership with TITANS of CNC, we are proud to recommit our efforts to building the next generation of young machinists.”

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10 Tips To Prevent Your CNC Machine From Standing Idle

10 Tips to Prevent Your CNC Machine From Standing Idle

While every situation is different, and different challenges play a role in every factory, here are some tips to prevent your CNC machine from standing idle. Article by BMO Automation.

10 Tips to Prevent Your CNC Machine From Standing Idle

With a servo controlled gripper, the operator no longer has to adjusts gripper fingers to the correct size.

A machine that is producing generates money. A machine that stands still costs money. In the machining sector, the full production capacity of CNC machines is often not used. Here are 10 tips to prevent your CNC machine from standing idle.

Tip 1: Standardise the raw material.

By standardizing the raw material, multiple product series can be made from the same format material. Simply put: mill more off. Changing products happens faster because the operator can use the same fixture. Resulting in less downtime.

Tip 2: Provide the CNC machine with a zero point clamping system.

With a zero point clamping system on the machining table, the operator can quickly change fixtures. Moreover, the advantage is that new fixtures can be prepared while the CNC machine is machining. With a zero point clamping system on the machining table you are also prepared for automated fixture changes.

Tip 3: Automate!

By providing a CNC machine with an automation solution, it will make more spindle hours. You can start automating at different levels. The easiest form is bar feed on a lathe. The next step is pallet and/or product loading.

Tip 4: Are you opting for single-batch or multi-batch automation?

What is single-batch automation? Automating of one product series. No continuous production but simply one unique product in one program loaded on the CNC machine through product loading. A higher level is multi-batch automation. Automating multiple product series in one continuous process. You combine the loading of products with the changing of a pallet with an automatic machine clamp or a clamped product on top. This makes 24/7 production of multiple product formats and product series possible. The biggest step towards less downtime is made with multi-batch automation. It is important that the machining table is equipped with the correct connections to control the machine clamps.

Tip 5: Choose one gripper that can handle it all.

The span on multiple product formats is great, but if the gripper cannot pick up all the sizes, the added value remains low. One solution is to use multiple grippers, but the changing will take time and the format range is often still limited and it comes at the expense of storage capacity. Another solution and a better one is the servo-controlled gripper that adjusts itself fully automatically to all possible product sizes. The setting time is 0 and the flexibility very high.

Tip 6: Continuous production of multiple product jobs.

All the previous tips are of little utility if only one CNC program can be produced with the automation software. Continuous production is necessary, otherwise the CNC machine will stop when the program comes to an end. Choose a software with which multiple different product series can be edited in a continuous process.

Tip 7: Focus on automating single pieces and small series.

On which products do you make the highest margins? Often these are single pieces and small series. By implementing all the previous tips, you have an automation that is fully set to this. With automation you can produce 24/7 and deliver faster due to a shorter product turnaround time. Selling ‘No’ because of a low capacity is something of the past. At least until your CNC machine makes 160 hours a week and you have to link a second CNC machine to the automation to meet the growing customer demand.

Tip 8: Make sure you have enough tools in your CNC machine.

A simple calculation. On average, a CNC machine has 60 tools of which 40 are standard. If you produce more than 5 different product series with 5 unique tools per series unmanned, you will already run into problems. A large tool stockroom is unnecessary luxury. Of course this can be taken into account by using the same tools as much as possible in the CNC programs during the preparation. But what happens when a miller breaks? Will you lose production and will the CNC machine stand still? Tip 9 offers a solution.

Tip 9: Manage the stand life of your tools.

The solution? Tool life management. The robot controls the total machining process but also calculates exactly which production per mill is feasible. Can the tools in the machine handle the numbers? What does the machine do if it breaks? The Tool Life Management module cleverly handles this and prevents the shutdown of your CNC machine.

Tip 10: Manage the automated process.

Continuous production and a maximum number of spindle hours are not simply achieved. Your operator has to become a process engineer. Does the coolant retain the correct values? Can the chip conveyor handle the quantity? Is the collection bin large enough? The total automated process must be optimized to avoid downtime.

These are just 10 tips to prevent your CNC machine from standing idle. Every situation is different, and different challenges play a role in every factory. Full use of production capacity involves attention, knowledge and experience. Be sufficiently informed and, above all, look carefully at your own process and the products that you produce.

 

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ANCA Discusses Trends Driving The Cutting Tool Industry

ANCA Discusses Trends Driving the Cutting Tool Industry

Pat Boland, co-founder of ANCA talks about electric vehicle manufacturing, their new motor temperature control technology, and his outlook for the year. Article by Stephen Las Marias.

Pat Boland

Founded in 1974, ANCA is one of the leading manufacturers of CNC grinding machines, motion controls, and sheet metal solutions. The company has manufacturing plants in Melbourne, Australia, and in Rayong, Thailand, as well as offices in the UK, Germany, China, India, Japan, Brazil, and the United States.

READ: Five Ways To Enhance CNC Machine Manufacturing With The Cloud

Pat Boland is the co-founder and joint managing director of ANCA. In an interview with Asia Pacific Metalworking Equipment News (APMEN), he talked about how their industry has changed over the past decades, trends driving the cutting tool industry, and the latest technologies in CNC machines.

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE MILESTONES THAT THE COMPANY HAS HAD OVER THE YEARS?

Pat Boland (PB): It’s been an interesting 45 years that ANCA has been operating, starting with some very simple four-axis machines, up to complex multi-axis machines today.

One of the key enablers for our machines is software. ANCA has pioneered several aspects of  CNC tool, cutter and grinder technology, and in particular, key software features. We were the first company to integrate in-machine measurement using a probe—measuring the geometry of the cutting tool and adapting the program to regrind it.

READ: ANCA Motion’s Multi-Axis Servo System Conserves 96 Percent Of Energy Wastage

We were the first to introduce full 3D simulation, which generates an accurate 3D model of the tool to be produced. This revolutionised the operation of machines because previously, people had to grind the part, look at it, and then make adjustments. With the simulation, it is possible to completely do that offline and be very confident of what you are going to produce in the machine.

ANCA is known for its innovation. We have our own unique form of servo motors to drive all our machines. We call them tubular linear motors—the introduction of which increased our technological capabilities significantly.

ONE OF YOUR NEW PRODUCTS, THE GCX LINEAR, IS TARGETED FOR ELECTRIC VEHICLES (EV). HOW DO YOU SEE THE DEVELOPMENT IN THIS SECTOR?

PB: There are many changes in the sector, which have broad impacts in the wider industry. The pending move to EVs is one of those items. In some ways, the machine tool industry is going to be affected very significantly by the simplification of the drive train of the EV compared to internal combustion engine. That will impact us in terms of demand for cutting tools.

However, there are some aspects in EV manufacturing, such as a large number of very accurate, small gears required for the electric gear boxes where efficiency is absolutely critical. Among those are the internal gears. Traditional methods of manufacturing internal gears such as shaper cutters are relatively slow and have geometrical limitations. But an old concept, called skiving, is becoming very popular to manufacture these internal gears.

READ: EMO 2019: ANCA To Launch Latest Generation Of ToolRoom Software

However, the difficulty with skiving is that every gear design requires a special cutter design, and for Class A, AA cutters, the accuracy of the cutters is extraordinarily tight.

The GCX is based on our TX7, but we have undertaken several developments such as improving the accuracy and efficiency of the machine for manufacturing skiving cutters. With software, we have a complete solution for the design and simulation of the skiving cutters, and the actual simulation of the skiving process.

So, the cutter can be designed, and the actual grinding path for that design can be generated. On the machine, we have redesigned several elements to really step up the accuracy. There is a new headstock, a new dressing technology, and other technologies such as an acoustic emission monitoring system. We also have  motor temperature control or MTC (patent pending), which we developed for skiving gear tool grinding, where we actively measure and control the temperature of all the rotary motors in the machine—the dressing spindles, the grinding spindles, the axis turning the cutter.

I am proud of MTC – our constant temperature spindle control because from an engineering point of view, it is very simple, but it has a big impact on the performance of the machine. And it is something different, and to my knowledge, something unique. Just by changing the firmware and the drive system for the spindle, we were able to hold the temperature, and really have quite a significant impact on the actual stability and performance of the machine. I think it is a breakthrough.

TELL US MORE ABOUT THE TECHNOLOGY?

PB: What we did is, when you run an electric motor, by changing the parameters, you can change the losses in the electric motor. And by changing the losses in the motor, we can regulate the temperature. You set a set point, say 27 deg C: if the temperature is 26 deg C, the machine will deliberately increase the losses in the motor to heat it up until it gets to 27 deg C. Then, if the temperature is over, the machine can reduce the losses to regulate that temperature.

READ: ANCA Motion Challenges The Conventional Approach To Cylindrical Grinding

As far as I know, it is unique. The spindle is a key component. When you get a temperature rise, you will get dimensional variation in the position of the wheel, the grinding wheel, or the cutting tool. Maintaining a very accurate temperature improves the basic dimensional accuracy of the machine.

WHAT ARE ITS BENEFITS?

PB: Typically, you must warm up a machine by running it through a cycle to get to a working temperature. That takes around half an hour. With this technology, heating the spindle up can reduce that half an hour to maybe 10 minutes. That’s cost saving. And then of course, while you are grinding, you reduce the dimensional variation.

READ: CNC Market Outlook: 7.3% CAGR During 2019-2023

This offers users improved accuracy and stability. We are talking about lights out manufacturing. Everything you can do to keep things stable in that lights out environment is a benefit. We are currently using it in some of our machines: the CPX and GCX Linear. When this technology goes through the rest of our machines, I think it will be highly popular with our customers in terms of improved dimensional stability.

WHAT IS YOUR OUTLOOK FOR THIS YEAR?

PB: By nature, I am always a bit of a pessimist, and there is a lot happening in the world to cause worry. But the world changes so quickly. China is such a large and diversified industrial market that I think business is going to be tougher there, but nevertheless, it will still be very significant business. Meanwhile, I see ASEAN countries still have a lot of opportunities for growth.

Overall, I expect probably a continuation of the cyclical downturn—but I don’t know how long that cycle is actually going to last. However, we will continue to provide innovative solutions for our customers who may be looking to diversify in response to market trends.

 

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NUM Launches Active Vibration Control System For CNC Machine Tools

NUM Launches Active Vibration Control System For CNC Machine Tools

NUM has launched an innovative accelerometer-based active vibration control system for CNC machine tools. Primarily designed to improve machining by virtually eliminating tool head vibration, the system further helps increase productivity by maximising material removal rate (MRR) and can also provide valuable real-time feedback for predictive maintenance purposes.

The system is available as a retrofittable option for any machine tool that uses NUM’s MDLUX high performance digital servo drives, which form part of the company’s Flexium+ CNC platform.

NUM’s active vibration control system is a very cost-effective solution that provides unprecedented dynamic damping capabilities. Most competitive accelerometers on the market are only capable of low frequency sampling rates and require additional signal conditioning electronics before they can be connected – usually via Fieldbus – to the CNC or PLC system. Typically, acceleration data can only be retrieved once every 20 milliseconds, which is inadequate for vibration damping purposes on machine tools. The accelerometer in NUM’s new system is sampled every 100 microseconds, which means that it can be used for closed loop control at bandwidths approaching several hundreds of Hertz.

The small flange-mounting accelerometer transducer can easily be attached to the machine’s tool head and has a sensitivity of 0.02 g (1.96 m/sec/sec), with a measurement range of plus/minus 2 g (plus/minus 19.6 m/sec/sec). The transducer connects directly to the digital servo drive, obviating the need for any additional signal conditioning circuitry.

The active vibration control system utilises the drive embedded macros (DEM-X) option that is available on NUM’s MDLUX high performance digital servo drives. This option enables real-time macros to be embedded within the drive-in order to manipulate its regulation algorithms. The output signal from the accelerometer transducer can thus be used to directly influence the behaviour of the speed servo control loop. All MDLUX servo drive modules use advanced DSP control techniques to maximise the CNC kernel-to-drive servo bus speed, and feature high loop bandwidths and special acceleration algorithms for uncompromised speed and positioning accuracy.

One of the most interesting applications of NUM’s new active vibration control system concerns Tool Centre Point (TCP) vibration due to the various vibration modes of a machine tool’s mechanical structure. Until now, even if the machine is equipped with a high-resolution encoder (integrated in the servo motor) it has been impossible to damp the TCP vibration, simply because it is not measured. Although complex system modelling and state-space control could possibly provide some effective results, the complexity is very high and the compensation robustness is quite weak. For example, in the case of a small parameter change, such as inertia, the effect of the compensation would be lost entirely.

However, by using NUM’s new active vibration control system to measure and dynamically alter the TCP acceleration in each of the main X, Y and Z axis directions, it is now possible to damp the vibration very accurately. Using this approach, tool head vibration can effectively be eliminated, significantly reducing tool wear and maximising the MRR of the machining process.

All acceleration data is processed within the drive in the digital domain, which means that it can be cyclically transmitted to the Flexium+ NCK and stored in the NCK buffer. The data can then be uploaded to the Windows operating system for further evaluation, or for use with NUM’s process monitoring software. It is especially useful for preventive maintenance applications, where it can provide early indication of potential machine problems before they become expensive repair tasks. Typically these include detecting spindle vibration caused by bearing problems, detecting the onset of performance deterioration such as increased friction or backlash, and detecting excessive tool wear or breakage.

 

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Choosing The Best Machining Centre For Your Application

Choosing the Best Machining Centre for Your Application

In an interview with Asia Pacific Metalworking Equipment News (APMEN), Michael Cope, product technical specialist at Hurco Companies Inc. talks about HMCs and VMCs, and which machining centre to use for your specific applications. Article by Stephen Las Marias.

Michael Cope

Hurco Companies Inc. manufactures computer numeric control (CNC) machine tools for the metal cutting and metal forming industry. Two of the company’s brands of machine tools, Hurco and Milltronics, are equipped with interactive controls that include software that is proprietary to each respective brand. Hurco designs these controls and develops the software. The third brand of CNC machine tools, Takumi, is equipped with third-party industrial controls, allowing customers to decide the type of control they need.

Hurco’s products are used by independent job shops, short-run manufacturing operations within large corporations, and manufacturers with production-oriented operations. Its customers are manufacturers of precision parts, tools, dies, and moulds for industries such as aerospace, defence, medical equipment, energy, transportation, and computer equipment. Based in Indiana, USA, Hurco has manufacturing operations in Taiwan, Italy, the US, and China. It also has sales, application engineering support, and service subsidiaries in England, France, India, Singapore, and Taiwan, to name a few.

In an interview with Asia Pacific Metalworking Equipment News (APMEN), Michael Cope, product technical specialist at Hurco, speaks about the latest technology developments in machining centres, in particular, horizontal machining centres (HMCs) and vertical machining centres (VMCs), and discusses whether one is better than the other. He also explains their applications, the latest customer requirements, and how machine manufacturers are keeping up to meet those demands.

Q: What is your company’s ‘sweet spot’?

Michael Cope: Hurco’s ‘sweet spot’ lies in our proprietary CNC controller. Powered by WinMax software, our CNC control is the key to making job shops more profitable because it is designed to make small-batch/high-mix production efficient by reducing setup time and programming time. In fact, 65 percent of our customers answered in a recent survey that ‘The Control’ is what they most like about Hurco.

Figure 1: Powered by its proprietary WinMax software, Hurco’s CNC control is the key to making job shops more profitable because it is designed to make small-batch/high-mix production efficient by reducing setup time and programming time.

Q: What are the biggest process challenges that your customers are facing and how are you helping them address such issues?

MC: Customers are getting jobs with increasing complexity in terms of geometries and number of set-ups, but at the same time lack the machinist and programmers with the necessary knowledge and experience to execute these jobs. We help them assess their new jobs and discuss practical ways to machine their parts. It may involve a new investment with addition capabilities such as 5-axis or HMC, or simply adding a rotary (fourth axis) or trunnion table (fourth and fifth axis) to their existing Hurco machines. There are also cases where the customer utilizes our showroom demo machine to run their first article with the assistance of our applications engineer.

Q: What opportunities do you see for your company in the coming years in Asia?

MC: The recent trade disputes between the US and China, and the impending review of the cross-border tariffs in various jurisdictions have affected overall market sentiments. Global manufacturers will re-evaluate their supply chain and would likely change their investment strategies, that is, new plants and sourcing territories. We see imminent growth potential in the ASEAN region as global manufacturers realign their strategies. We will continue our investment in Southeast Asia with our partners/distributors so that our technology will help bridge the knowledge gap faced by end users in these emerging economies.

Q: How would you differentiate HMC from VMC, and what are their advantages and disadvantages?

MC: HMCs typically cost more than a standard VMC, but can provide lots of benefits to the customer: better chip and coolant control, almost always are equipped with a fourth axis rotary table, and can allow the operator to utilize multi-sided tombstone type fixturing that will facilitate a larger number of parts in a single setup. HMCs are also usually equipped with a pallet changer, which allows the operator to be loading parts while the machine is running—therefore reducing the down time necessary between cycles.

VMCs are the more traditional type of machine configuration and are found in almost every shop. For everyday job-shops, where they are running small to medium lot sizes, the required amount of machine setups necessary in a single week (or even in a single day) might make a HMC less attractive. Although they are very good at machining lots of parts—even multi-sided work—HMCs typically are not as quick and easy to setup as a VMC, and therefore might not be the best choice for a shop with a high mix of low-volume work.

In high production scenarios, a HMC can really shine. Again, the ability to fixture a larger number of parts in one setup on a multi-sided tombstone fixture, and the ability to reach at least three sides of each part, can help tremendously when running a production run with large volumes. Also, when running large volumes, with lots of cutting, a large amount of chips will be produced. The HMC is designed to assist with the efficient removal of these chips.

Q: What are the latest technology developments in HMCs and VMCs?

MC: One area of technology that comes to mind is speed and motion control. Modern machines are getting faster—both in programmable feedrates, as well as rapid traverse feedrates—and the motion control systems are getting faster, too. This increased speed not only allows shops to get work done faster, but they are also producing better parts. Surface finishes, part accuracies, and overall machine longevity are all things that are benefiting from these technology advancements, and are helping shops become more productive and more efficient.

Figure 2: The VCX600i cantilever 5-axis machine is equipped with CTS and linear scales, a 12k spindle, and B-axis travel of +40/-110 deg.

Q: Tell us more about your latest machining centres.

MC: We have launched our second-generation Performance cantilever style 5-axis machining centre, the VCX600i, designed for high speed cutting. The VCX600i features a motorized spindle with spindle speed up to 18,000rpm, a torque table with absolute rotary encoders, and several tool change options. Coupled with our new 3D Solid Model Import software, programming of a multi-sided part can be easily completed via Hurco conversational programming with literally just a few clicks.

We have also delivered our first two HM1700Ri HMCs in Asia to the oil and gas industry. The HM1700Ri features BT50 Motorized Spindle and an 800mm diameter rotary torque table that is embedded within a 1,650x840mm worktable. This unique table set-up provides the end user the flexibility to work on parts larger than the rotary table using its X, Y, Z travels.

Q: What advice would you give your customers when it comes to their machining processes and choosing their machining solutions?

MC: If a customer has a machine that is performing well in their shop, then they should use that machine as long as it keeps making them money—especially if it is paid for! However, we see too any shops that fall into the trap of buying used equipment when they need to add a machine to their shop. They think they are saving money by spending less on the purchase, but truthfully—with all the advancements in today’s controls and machine technology as a whole—they are probably losing money. The time it will take to see a return on that additional investment will be short, and the benefit they will reap from the new technology will be quick and the impact will be substantial over time.

 

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Hurco’s Net Income Hit US$13.3 Million In 2016

Hurco’s Net Income Hit US$13.3 Million In 2016

Indianapolis, US: Hurco Companies—a manufacturer of computer numeric control machine tools for metal cutting and metal forming—recorded net income of US$13.3 million or US$1.99 per diluted share for fiscal year 2016 which ended October 31, 2016, compared to US$16.2 million or US$2.44 per diluted share, for fiscal year 2015. 

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