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Globaldata: ASEAN Vehicle Sales Down By 28 Percent In 2020

Globaldata: ASEAN Vehicle Sales Down By 28 Percent In 2020

The sales of new vehicles in Southeast Asia’s six largest markets (Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Vietnam, Singapore) combined are estimated to have declined by 28.5 percent to 2,468,613 units in 2020, according to GlobalData.

David Leggett, Automotive Analyst at GlobalData, says: “The annual picture shows much sharper declines earlier in the year, including a 24 percent drop in the third quarter and a 66 percent plunge in the second quarter, when economic activity across the region was severely disrupted by business and social lockdowns put in place to help slow the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. Some markets in the region, such as Thailand, began to stabilise in the fourth quarter while sales in Malaysia and Vietnam began to rebound.”

GlobalData’s analysis shows the Association of Southeast Asian Nations’ (ASEAN) largest vehicle market in 2020 was Thailand, despite a more than 21 percent sales decline to 792,146 units while Indonesia slipped into second place after sales fell by over 48 percent to 532,027 units – making it the region’s worst-performing market last year. Malaysia was a close third, with sales down by just over 12 percent at 529,434 units.

Mr Leggett concludes: “While significant economic restrictions remain in place across the region, including a ban on foreign tourist arrivals, which continues to have a devastating effect on the travel, tourism and hospitality sectors, domestic economic activity has begun to recover – helped by low interest rates and fiscal stimulus measures introduced by national governments.

“Exports also enjoyed a moderate rebound towards the end of last year, helped by strong demand from China, but renewed lockdowns in the region and in numerous markets around the world in response to a resurgent COVID-19 have dampened sentiment in recent weeks.”

 

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Frost & Sullivan: Welding Vendors Focusing On New Technologies And Energy Efficiency

Frost & Sullivan: Welding Vendors Focusing On New Technologies And Energy Efficiency

Frost & Sullivan’s recent analysis, Newer Welding Techniques to Enable Growth in the Digital Age, reports that increasing competition in the global welding equipment and consumables market has led manufacturers to focus on energy efficiency, operational excellence and reducing maintenance costs. Amid the uncertain economic conditions caused by COVID-19, the industry is forecast to reach $21.74 billion by 2024, growing at a CAGR of 1.3 percent. Growth is driven by opportunities from developing regions where infrastructure building, the introduction of new welding technologies, and automation are top priorities.

“Several new developments in welding technologies and materials are emerging due to an increased focus on energy efficiency from vendors and end-users. Advancements such as the ability to monitor and regulate the weld temperature while in the process are generating highly efficient outputs and better quality. These innovations will reduce operational tasks, improve energy management and extend electrode life,” said Krishnan Ramanathan, Industry Manager, Industrial Technologies Practice, Frost & Sullivan.

Digital transformation is gaining traction in Australia and Singapore as their communications infrastructure is upgraded. This digitalisation is expected to propel the welding market as other countries modernise. China, India, and Brazil are also vital for welding equipment and consumables suppliers as they have high energy and infrastructure requirements. However, the development rate is likely to be gradual as economies recover from the impact of COVID-19.

“IIoT is a major trend affecting equipment manufacturers as end-users continue to emphasise on improving their plant maintenance and curb operational expenditure (OPEX),” Ramanathan said. “With the global economy currently experiencing a dynamic environment, manufacturers are striving to improve operational efficiency in their existing plants and are keen to cut down the maintenance and operational costs due to unexpected failure and asset downtime. Realising that the future of manufacturing is likely to be driven by IIoT, companies today are turning their focus toward data ownership, security, and integration with existing infrastructure, with an intent to achieve returns on their investment in these solutions.”

Welding equipment manufacturers should explore these strategic recommendations to increase growth opportunities:

  • Collaborate with technology providers to enhance capabilities and meet varying end-user requirements. Leveraging state-of-the-art technologies and consumables will result in higher-quality welds and cost-savings for end users.
  • Expand the business approach by offering the option to rent welding equipment to reduce capital expenditure.
  • Continue working with traditional channel partners due to their wide reach while exploring alternative distribution and servicing options.
  • Focus on the Middle East, Africa, India, and Southeast Asia regions as these will witness a surge in demand due to increased urbanisation.

 

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Three Ways Additive Manufacturing Defined 2020

Three Ways Additive Manufacturing Defined 2020

While additive manufacturing has been trending toward mass adoption for some time, the global pandemic has accelerated this momentum. Here are three ways how metal 3D printing has defined manufacturing this year. Article by Richard Elving, Markforged.

While 3D printing has been around since the 1980s, advancements in technology and the unprecedented supply chain disruption due to COVID-19 have driven more mainstream adoption throughout 2020.  While the pandemic has wreaked havoc on global business, causing shutdowns and spikes in demand, we’ve also heard positive stories of true innovation from businesses across the manufacturing sector.

Markforged’s inaugural annual COVID-19 Impact on Supply Chains: Global Additive Manufacturing Industry Report found that modern manufacturers—or, those who adopt digital manufacturing solutions such as 3D printing—were the most resilient during the pandemic, reporting that they’ve been operating “business as usual,” while other manufacturers scaled production back. 

Based on research conducted with our global customer base and the wider industry, the report notes that almost one quarter (24 percent) of our customer respondents said they had begun producing new products during the pandemic, and 45 percent stated that “nothing has changed, it’s business as usual.” With 28 percent of customer respondents noting that they are now using 3D printing more compared to pre-pandemic usage, it’s clear that 2020 has been a year that we will look back upon as an inflection point for additive technologies. 

While additive manufacturing has been trending toward mass adoption for some time, the global pandemic has accelerated this momentum. Here are three ways we’ve seen metal 3D printing define manufacturing this year.

  1. Identifying Solutions to Supply Chain Delays

In March and April of 2020, we saw supply chains across the globe break. Whether it was from unpredictable supply and demand patterns, unreliable suppliers or broken line parts that could not be traditionally replaced, the manufacturing industry was devastated. As international supply chains continue to strain while we continually battle the virus, manufacturers want more control over their supply chains. 

But, by turning to the flexible solutions offered by 3D printing, manufacturers were able to rapidly engineer robust solutions and simplify their logistics. By leveraging printers to solve their supply chain problems, manufacturers were able to remain resilient in the face of unprecedented difficulties.

One of Markforged’s customers, an orthopaedics business, was one organisation that was able to streamline its manufacturing processes with the help of an industrial 3D printer. Extended waiting times for a specific medical grade raw material casting forced this business to explore all of the options available to them–including the printer they were already using to print tooling jigs and fixtures. They printed a duplicate of the raw cast part they were waiting for and were able to perform full test runs of their manufacturing process. 

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Schuler Installs Forging Lines For Chinese Customer Despite Pandemic

Schuler Installs Forging Lines For Chinese Customer Despite Pandemic

In the middle of the Corona pandemic, Schuler has installed two forging lines in China, one of which has already been handed over and the other is about to be. This was made possible not least by remote maintenance and virtual commissioning, which allowed all functions to be simulated in advance on the computer and adapted to the customer’s needs. The screw press and the crank press forge aluminum chassis parts fully automatically. Schuler supplied the lines including the dies and furnaces.forging line

The production data of both lines can optionally be accessed via the “mySchuler” portal from anywhere and at any time. The “Production Monitor” displays the operating status and the current stroke rate. The “Press Force Monitor” provides information about the load on the machine and die, “Drive Analytics” enables operators to monitor the main drives and “Cooling Analytics” allows them to monitor the cooling circuits. “Lubrication Analytics” makes it possible to control the lubrication circuit including lubrication cycles, system pressure or oil temperature depending on the stroke rate. In this way, possible deviations can be detected at an early stage and quickly remedied.

Screw presses from Schuler feature a press force of between 250 and 28,000 tons. The water-cooled servo direct drive transmits the torque of the motor without losses and offers a high level of robustness, precision, operational reliability, and economy. The 750 to 16,000 ton crank presses are particularly suitable for mass production. Depending on the specific requirements, the press frame as well as the drive system is designed for high manufacturing precision and high production rates.

 

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GlobalData: Thailand Automotive Production And Domestic Sales To Revive In 2021

GlobalData: Thailand Automotive Production And Domestic Sales To Revive In 2021

The Federation of Thai Industries (FTI) expects domestic car sales to decline by 5.3 percent in 2021, after a 21.4 percent slump in the previous year. Following this news, Bakar Sadik Agwan, Senior Automotive Consulting Analyst at GlobalData, offers his view:

“Thailand automotive production output and domestic sales followed downward trend in 2020. In line with GlobalData’s estimates, the country’s production output declined by 29.14 percent to 1.43 million units. The domestic sales also remained low with a 21.4 percent decline to 792K units compared to 2019. 2020 remained a bumpy ride for the Thailand auto industry, with January-July sales slipping down to 2008 levels and the auto production witnessing y-o-y decline for straight 10 months of the year. However, November and December showed signs of revival with y-o-y production and sales witnessing an increase, which is attributed to new car launches by automakers, attractive discounts and promotion campaigns and the financial stimulus by the government.

“Weak domestic and overseas demand amid the COVID-19 pandemic, major supply chain disruptions affecting production, massive slowdown in tourism sector, subdued economic growth and negative consumer sentiments remained major factors behind the production and sales de-growth in 2020. Some of these factors may further impact the production and sales in 2021 along with second wave of COVID-19 in domestic and some export markets, and ongoing chips shortages in the picture. FTI expects the vehicle production to reach 1.5 million units in 2021, marginally up compared to 2020. Thailand Board of Investment (BOI)’s new investment privileges and tax breaks to manufacturers are expected to support automotive production.

“Domestic demand in Thailand is anticipated to witness revival in 2021. However, volumes are expected to remain below 2020 levels. The government’s economic stimulus measures, growth in tourism, investment in infrastructure projects and government push for EV adoption are expected to boost automotive sales and support FTI’s projection of 750K vehicles sales in 2021, which will be a 5.3 percent decline y-o-y but significant improvement compared to 21.4 percent decline in 2020.”

 

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Emerson’s Shanghai Research And Development Center Recognised For Innovation In Welding And Precision Cleaning

Emerson’s Shanghai Research And Development Center Recognised For Innovation In Welding And Precision Cleaning

Branson R&D Center receives designation for exceptional work delivering high-performance plastic and metal assembly technology to China and the world.

The Shanghai municipal government recognised Emerson’s Branson Research and Development Center for its contributions to technical innovation in ultrasonic, laser, vibration, infrared and thermal plastic welding, as well as ultrasonic metal welding and precision cleaning.

In a Nov. 19 ceremony, Gong Zheng, mayor of Shanghai Municipal People’s Government, presented the designation “Shanghai Multinational Company R&D Center” to Emerson’s David Shen, general manager for Emerson’s Branson welding and assembly products. The Center, which employs a staff of more than 30 R&D personnel, was one of nine organisations recognised that day for meeting specific investment, employment, facility, and technology transfer and adoption benchmarks set by the government.

“China’s industrial supply chain is undergoing a rapid economic recovery, a factor that has injected confidence into the global fight against COVID-19,” said Shen. “We will continue to adhere to the localised development strategy of ‘in China, for China,’ using innovative technologies and industry expertise, proactively focusing on new product development, and contributing to the transformation and upgrading of industry.”

As a large-scale, comprehensive ultrasonic equipment production and technology development enterprise, Emerson is committed to technological innovation in the fields of plastic welding, ultrasonic metal welding and precision cleaning.

Shen added that as a trusted welding expert for leading companies in various industries in China, Emerson will continue to advance welding technology, provide customers with professional and reliable customised welding application solutions, and help customers to succeed in light of new market trends. “The strength of our research and development expertise contributes to this effort,” he noted.

The plastic and metal welding experts at the multinational center in Shanghai have played a primary role in developing and introducing key Emerson technologies to China and to the world. These include the Branson GLX-Micro ultrasonic plastic welder, the Branson GL-300 laser welder, the Branson GMX-20 ultrasonic metal spot welding platform, and the Branson GCX ultrasonic generator for precision ultrasonic cleaning systems.

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Bystronic’s Johan Elster: Get Ready For The Upturn

Bystronic’s Johan Elster: Get Ready for the Upturn

Johan Elster of Bystronic Group discussed the impact of COVID-19 in the overall metalworking industry, what manufacturers learned amid this pandemic, and whether the industry is already seeing light at the end of the tunnel.

Bystronic is one of the leading providers of sheet metal processing technologies, focusing on the automation of the complete material and data flow of the cutting and bending process chain. Its portfolio includes laser cutting systems, press brakes, and associated automation and software solutions. 

In an interview with Asia Pacific Metalworking Equipment News, Johan Elster, President Business Unit Markets, Bystronic Group discussed the impact of COVID-19 in the overall metalworking industry, what manufacturers learned amid this pandemic, and whether the industry is already seeing light at the end of the tunnel.

OVER THE PAST YEAR, HOW HAS THE PANDEMIC IMPACTED THE OVERALL METALWORKING INDUSTRY?

JOHAN ELSTER (JE): The impact was certainly there, but we were not hit as hard as, for example, the tourism, the airline business, or restaurants. It affected us about as much as it affected many other industrial businesses. A big problem was that a lot of materials produced in China no longer arrived worldwide, so the supply chain was interrupted. This also affected our customers who, therefore, had to stop their production. They were forced to look for local suppliers at short notice. In the meantime, this has calmed down in recent months because China is able produce again.”

WHAT DO YOU THINK SHOULD MANUFACTURERS HAVE IMPLEMENTED BY NOW AS THEY RESUME PRODUCTION?

JE: Everyone should generally have a plan B. For instance, everyone should have a dual-supplier concept so that it can be switched to local suppliers if necessary. On the other hand, digitization has generally begun. Maybe, the world should have pushed ahead with it a bit earlier, because the technology was already available.

HOW DO YOU SEE THE METALWORKING INDUSTRY TRANSFORMING AMID THIS GLOBAL ISSUE?

JE: Man gets used to many things and always learns to live with them. Of course, something has changed in general, but it was especially severe in the industry. We are currently experiencing the effects that we saw already before the lockdowns: smaller and smaller batch sizes, automation, increasing digitalization—also for our customers, low-cost products from China… These are the trends we are currently seeing.

WHAT OTHER ISSUES HAVE YOU SEEN IMPACTING THE METALWORKING INDUSTRY, PARTICULARLY IN ASEAN? IS THE US-CHINA TRADE WAR STILL RELEVANT?

JE: The China-U.S. trade war is not necessarily relevant in the rest of Asia. After the boom in 2018, the global economy has been in a steady decline—and that has nothing to do with this trade war. The recession would have happened anyway. China recovered relatively fast after the pandemic. Today, the industry there is practically at the same level as before, but the punitive tariffs of the U.S. are still effective. This has a significant impact on the country, but not on ASEAN countries.

PLEASE DESCRIBE THE STATE OF THE METALWORKING INDUSTRY IN SOME OF YOUR MARKETS IN ASEAN AMID THIS PANDEMIC.

JE: In Malaysia, for example, we see a trend towards automation. This was not the case two or three years ago. In Indonesia or Thailand, however, this is not the case yet. But in the ASEAN region, too, Chinese manufacturers with their lower-priced products are increasingly coming into play. There are many small companies in the ASEAN region that have the opportunity to invest now in such low-cost machines, which was not the case before. The initial investment is often a big obstacle for young and small companies, so this obstacle is naturally decreasing now.

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Digital Transformation in a Time of Crisis

 

 

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3D Printing Metal Technology: Before, During And After COVID-19

3D Printing Metal Technology: Before, During And After COVID-19

The global 3D printing metal market is projected to manifest a significant CAGR from 2019 to 2026, mainly driven by the high-end advancement in 3D technology. Article by Allied Market Research.

Professionals involved in designing and fabricating metal parts are well aware of the immense possibilities of metal 3D printing. And, using additive manufacturing methods for projects has now become a common practice in the manufacturing units. Well, there are an array of different 3D printing equipment and mechanisms available in the market. And, metal 3D printing technology is evolving really fast, giving life to promising and excellent projects. 

According to Allied Market Research, the global 3D printing metal market is projected to manifest a significant compound annual growth rate (CAGR) from 2019 to 2026. High-end advancement in 3D technology is anticipated to propel the market expansion in more than one way. Additive manufacturing methods that make use of glass, paper, bio-inks, and several compounds and metals for printing, has supplemented the growth yet more. 

Also, in Southeast Asia, the 3D printing metal sector has started witnessing an increasing demand from the defense and aerospace market, as the metals are believed to diminish weight of the aerospace parts and perk up the craft’s overall efficiency. With conventional manufacturing process on board, this thing actually becomes time-consuming and expensive. The ability of 3D printing metals to print low-priced equipment in considerable less time has worked as the major factor boosting the market growth. Also, top-end advancements in technology and rise in penetration of bio-based materials have propelled the market in Southeast Asian countries to a significant extent.

The main benefit of metal 3D printing lies in its constant and unremitting expansion in the range of metallic composites. The fact that these metals enable manufacturers to fabricate parts of any desired mechanical properties has increased their importance to a considerable stretch. Also, with additive manufacturing on board, transition from the designing phase to the production of the final parts is quite faster which, in turn, has proven to be highly beneficial to the manufacturers.

At the same time, considering the metal parts from the perspective of a designer, 3D printing technologies make space for the production of exclusive and distinctive structures. The technology also allows raw materials to be added, shaped, and molded layer by layer. And, they don’t need to be conked out of a bulk compact figure. This makes sure that the material is placed only where it is required and this way, the cost of the materials used to process the relevant components is reduced. This certainly makes metal 3D printing a resource-efficient process. 

With the use of the technology, one can also combine different functions and features into a single printed part, without being least worried about giving rise to any sort of complexities. When they can incorporate new functionalities in, they can also create new channels & lattices to enhance the much-needed lubrication in projects. External surface grains can also be formed to brush up adhesion or to tether to another part.

COVID-19 Scenario

Before the rise of the pandemic, the 3D printing metal market was expected to continue its swatch of substantial growth. In the last few years, revenue has mounted up to a considerable extent, emergence of new entrants have been noticed in the sector, and investments in the technology were also pretty huge from different nooks and corners. But, after the pandemic has broken out, it is anticipated to experience a steep decline in terms of revenue that will, somehow, take years to recoup from.

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Digital Transformation In A Time Of Crisis

Digital Transformation in a Time of Crisis

As COVID-19 strikes, all companies in various sectors are facing a huge challenge of sustaining their businesses. People are being forced to make hard decision on whether to close their doors or digitally innovate even further. Article by Makino.

COVID-19 has paved the way for digital transformation as businesses shift operations to cope with office closures, restricted movement and supply interruption.

Digital transformation has always made sense but adoption has been slowed as people deal with some of the overwhelming concepts around Industry 4.0, the sheer size of the task, and struggle to figure out where the value is coming from and where they can find the “digital dividend”. 

Now, the needs are compelling and urgent and those that fail to transform will likely be left behind and risk becoming irrelevant and uncompetitive.

Transformation in Manufacturing Industry

To create an ecosystem that is digitally enabled, one must have the ability to model a disruption in real-time, the agility to respond to that disruption, and the resilience to cope with whatever the world has to throw at it. 

This is demanded not only by the manufacturers, but also by their customers, inventors, creditors, and insurers. As a result, an extensive digitisation of the shop floor, including its integration with all the other systems, is becoming essential rather than nice to have. It provides the necessary first layer of high-quality data, upon which another layer of insight generation, decision support, and control of production processes—all in real time—must be superimposed. Such systems must become an order of magnitude better than what exists today.

Digital Transformation with Makino

Makino has been actively moving towards the trend of digitalisation. Its facility is designed to meet the growing demand for high-quality products and sophisticated precision engineering capabilities by adopting Industry 4.0 and the principles of Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT).

Despite transforming the facility into a Smart Factory, Makino also acts as a partner which helps their customers to drive them and motivates them towards transformation.

Retool Your Business Processes to Compete in the Global Die/Mould Market

Common practice and misconceptions can lead mould, tool and die owners to conclude that automation offers few benefits to their businesses due to the demands for tight tolerances and one-off or small runs of complex 3D shapes. In today’s competitive global marketplace, with pressures to improve quality and pricing without increasing investment in machines or labour, the time is right to consider taking a production approach.

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Thailand’s Electronics Sector Still A Magnet For Investors Amid Pandemic

Thailand’s Electronics Sector Still A Magnet For Investors Amid Pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic and the US-China trade friction have failed to slow Thailand’s resilient electronics and electrical (E&E) industry which on the contrary many investors see as a haven, Thailand Board of Investment (BOI) data shows.

In the first nine months of 2020, the number of foreign and domestic companies which applied to invest in Thailand’s E&E sector actually rose to 106 projects, from 94 projects in the same period in 2019, making it by far the most popular sector, totaling over $1.2 billion in investment applications submitted to the BOI.

With a supply chain of some 2,500 companies and 800,000 employees ranging from researchers with doctoral degrees to vocationally trained technicians and experienced assembly line workers, it is the country’s largest manufacturing employer, according to Thailand’s Electrical and Electronics Institute (EEI).

“E&E is fundamental to Thailand 4.0”, said EEI president Narat Rujirat, referring to the innovation-driven growth strategy of Southeast Asia’s second largest economy.

This ambitious vision involves creating a regional hub for futuristic industries including medical devices, electric vehicles, robotics and automation. At its heart is the technological transformation of one of Thailand’s long-established core industries, electrical and electronics, into what is today termed “Smart E&E” and the emergence of the so-called Internet of Things (IOT).

Thailand’s E&E sector has burgeoned into a global powerhouse and is the world’s second largest exporter of computer hard disc drives, air conditioners and washing machines, according to GSB Research, a unit of Thailand’s largest state-owned bank.

In total, Thailand’s E&E industry generates $56.5 billion worth of exports in 2019, or 24 percent of total exports, according Thailand’s Ministry of Commerce and GSB Research.

In addition to a strong supply chain and skilled human resources, Thailand’s attraction for E&E investors also stems from its strategic geographical location at the crossroads of Asia, which has enabled it to become one of the world’s top exporters.

Investors also benefit from privileges offered by the BOI. E&E companies focused on innovation and research and development can receive tax breaks of up to 8 years and other incentives such as renewable smart visas of up to four years for international talent and investors in key sectors such as smart electronics, as well as their families. The BOI also supports companies by helping establish industrial linkage, sourcing of local suppliers and business matching. Many companies have developed strong partnerships with local academic institutions.

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