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A New World Of Laser Tracker Scanning

A New World of Laser Tracker Scanning

Here’s a look at the development path of the world’s first direct scanning laser tracker. Article by Joel Martin, Hexagon Geosystems.

Manufacturing innovations have often been the driving force behind new developments in the field of metrology—the science of measurement. New combinations of hardware and software are allowing engineers to solve problems in new ways that simply weren’t possible before.

In the late 1990s, technological advancements delivered a new device known as the laser tracker, which has gone on to establish itself as a worldwide standard for large-scale alignment and verification tasks. A laser tracker is a portable coordinate measurement machine (PCMM) that uses a laser beam to accurately measure and inspect the features of an object in 3D space. This beam is sent to a spherically mounted retro-reflector touching the object to measure two angles and a distance, thus calculating its position and defining it with an X, Y, Z coordinate.

Laser trackers were quick to find their home in large-scale manufacturing, largely because no other measurement solution could accomplish such tasks. They allowed engineers to perform wing-to-body alignments or even tooling verification faster and more accurately than ever before. But the first generation of laser trackers had their own special issues, such as when line of sight between the laser tracker and the reflector was interrupted and the operator would have to walk the steel sphere back to a home position to pick up the laser beam from the tracker.

This limitation reduced operator efficiency, and consequently cost money, especially if the reflector was being tracked from a distance of some 20m away. While workarounds were available, it was not uncommon to see the connection interrupted repeatedly if there were physical obstacles in the work area such a workers or cables.

The solution to this issue was first provided by Hexagon in 20XX when the PowerLock feature was first introduced to their Absolute Tracker range of laser trackers. However, laser trackers still required the skilled hand of a well-trained operator to deliver reliable results.

A Breakthrough Driven by Automotive

The next great development in the history of laser tracker systems came after a major automotive OEM challenged several metrology leaders to design a system that could track a handheld device capable of non-contact scanning a surface around an area the size of a car with tracker-like accuracy.

Although it wasn’t immediately met, this challenge was behind the introduction of the first large-volume wireless probe, which worked like a “walk around CMM” by allowing the operator to use its common stylus to measure a part in a way similar to using a CMM or portable measuring arm.

This breakthrough was made possible by the introduction of a new type of laser tracker that, rather than simple 3D measurement, could measure with “six degrees of freedom”. These “6DoF” laser trackers, the first of which was the landmark Leica Absolute Tracker AT901, were capable of measuring not just a single point, but an orientation around that point about a full six axes.

Most importantly, from a productivity standpoint, this new device allowed the measurement of hidden points within recesses, or simply points on the back side of the measurement object, without repositioning the laser tracker.

Early benchmarks showed that this new probing capability could provide an increase in throughput of up to 80 percent over traditional reflector measurement. This technology created such a dramatic shift in the way objects were measured that the reflector—the very tool that had until now been key to the functionality of the laser tracker—ended up being used far less often for measurement tasks.

Introducing Scanning

The idea of surface digitisation with a laser tracker is nothing new; an operator in 1995 could be seen dragging a reflector over the surface of an aerostructure to create a simple point cloud. But the introduction of the 6DoF tracker opened up the possibility to take this a giant leap further.

But laser tracker based large-volume scanning has accelerated over the past six years. An example is a laser scanner with extreme speed that is tracked by a laser tracker and attached to a commercial of-the-shelf robot. This scanner-tracker integration effectively turns a standard robot into a very accurate shop floor measuring machine.

This fundamental shift in measuring from physically touching a part to measure it to “just scanning it” has allowed manufacturers to completely rethink their metrology workflows and equipment.

At around the same time that 6DoF probing and scanning was changing the workflows and typical applications of laser trackers, 3D terrestrial laser scanning was beginning to find its first applications in large scale manufacturing. This high-speed LIDAR scanning technology was originally deployed for geospatial land surveying, allowing an operator to collect millions of points very quickly in the course of capturing the surface of buildings or the surrounding landscape.

On the other end of the spectrum, there are handheld scanners with an ultra large stand-off area of up to three feet with a scan line of over two feet wide that captures huge amounts of data very rapidly. Other contemporary scanners allow the operator to measure objects the size of an average car from a single station (position) in less than 30 minutes. The need to scan very large objects quickly with metrology-grade accuracies has driven different manufacturers to integrate their laser trackers to several different scanners. In addition to the hand scanners described above, there are also examples of structured light scanners located by laser tracker, as well as terrestrial laser scanners using laser trackers to control their global accuracies.

The Industrialisation of Terrestrial Measurement

Laser trackers have the inherent ability to hold very tight tolerances over very large distances. This important feature renders the marriage of laser trackers and terrestrial laser scanners as a natural progression. Terrestrial laser scanners can measure millions of points very quickly, but it can be a challenge to register these point clouds together while maintaining metrology grade accuracies. It is exactly this need that lead the industry to another advancement in laser tracker technology—a scanning absolute distance meter that pushes laser trackers into the next level of usability. A scanning ADM that measures at an internal rate of over one million points per second is now integrated in a new line of laser trackers. The technology can register submillimetre noncontact surface scans with metrology grade SMR laser tracker measurements—all within a single battery powered IP54 sensor for factory floor usage or remote outdoor applications. This new product line effectively bridges the gap between laser trackers and lidar scanners.

Looking to the Future

Manufacturing has changed dramatically since that aerospace engineer was tasked with aligning the wings to the fuselage of the 747 more than 50 years ago. The modern airplanes replacing this legendary gem require an increasing amount of data-driven processes with an even higher level of precision was achievable before. In the past, some level of misalignment in the aerostructure could simply be “trimmed out” during flight testing, but today that equates to inefficiencies of the aircraft. To reach the fuel efficiency requirements of the burgeoning aerospace industry, new inspection processes and technology must continue to advance.

I have been involved with laser trackers since the early days and witnessed the evolution of this solution as it has grown and matured at a consistent rate. It has been amazing to watch some of the smartest minds in metrology push the power and usage envelope on this technology, considering its humble roots. Today, laser trackers are utilized in almost every type of large-scale manufacturing from aerospace to power generation. The emerging trend towards noncontact scanning is pioneering another giant leap for a technology that seems to have no limits.

 

Read more:

Hexagon’s Absolute Arm Now Features 3D Laser Scanner

Hexagon Launches QUINDOS 2019.2

Faro Launches Cobalt Design Structured Light 3D Scanner

How Industrial Robots Increase Sawing Productivity

New High-Definition Feature Scanner For Automated Inspection

 

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Hexagon Opens New Solutions Centre In Japan

Hexagon Opens New Solutions Centre In Japan

Hexagon’s Manufacturing Intelligence division has opened a new facility in Nagoya, Japan, designed to facilitate greater understanding and adoption of industry 4.0 principles and solutions in the region. The new factory will serve customers in Japan as a learning and demonstration centre, showcasing a range of Hexagon’s smart factory solutions.

Hexagon’s footprint expansion in the region will enable the company to better serve its Japanese customer base, helping local manufacturers in a range of industries including automotive and aerospace drive productivity by building intelligence into their operations with advanced, data-driven manufacturing solutions. The centre will offer demonstrations of the full suite of Hexagon’s smart factory solutions, covering design and engineering, production, and metrology.

The new facility will also serve as a collaborative centre for local business entities across Hexagon’s Manufacturing Intelligence division, including teams working within Hexagon’s production software and metrology solutions portfolios, and local representatives from MSC Software.

“For manufacturers across the globe, transformative technologies that deliver greater insights into operations are crucial for competitiveness going forward,” says Norbert Hanke, President of Hexagon’s Manufacturing Intelligence division. “In today’s economic uncertainty, there’s never been a more critical time to make manufacturing smarter. This new facility will showcase the forward-thinking products and solutions that our customers in Japan are looking for to drive greater productivity.”

 

Further reading:

VinFast Deploys Siemens’ Full Portfolio To Deliver Cars Ahead Of Schedule

AMendate Acquisition Helps Hexagon Minimise Time-to-Print for Additive Manufacturing

Hexagon Manufacturing Intelligence Division To Set Up New Canadian HQ In Toronto

Makino Strengthens Presence In Vietnam With New Technology Centre

 

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Hexagon Launches PC-DMIS 2019 R2

Hexagon Launches PC-DMIS 2019 R2

Hexagon’s Manufacturing Intelligence division has launched PC-DMIS 2019 R2, the latest edition of its measurement software. PC-DMIS 2019 R2 introduces Home Page, a new way to interact with PC-DMIS that improves convenience, productivity and brings content to the user in an attractive, intuitive way, whether user focus is on the creation of measurement routines or executing them in the factory.

Home Page is a significant enhancement of the traditional PC-DMIS main screen to make recent programs and favourites accessible directly from the home screen. Users can create folders and organise their measurement routines how they need them. Home Page also brings helpful content and support directly into PC-DMIS. Users now have seamless access to the latest product news, support contact, helpful videos, the PC-DMIS idea centre and the regular PC-DMIS newsletter (SMA needed).

The already broad capabilities of PC-DMIS are extended further with new optional support for the skidless Breitmeier Messtechnik Roughness Sensor. Allowing users to measure roughness in PC-DMIS for the first time, the user-friendly interface enables the user to create a roughness scan command in one click, without needing extensive training or to learn new software.

The new Thickness Colormap function, meanwhile, provides clear, intuitive graphics showing the thickness of a component. This feature can either show measured thickness using mesh or point cloud data or can be used to show deviations to the CAD model.

Another notable enhancement includes new capabilities introduced to the software’s widely acclaimed GD&T Selection from Capture. When released in 2019 R1, this new feature helped transform the way GD&T data is added to a measurement program. Now it has been improved with better OCR recognition, including feature control frames, datums and datum targets.

With the new Ring Light Migration feature, users can now move measurement programs from one machine to a machine that uses different ring light configurations faster and with fewer errors. This allows the efficient migration of programs on offline machines, maximising machine productivity. Enhancements to the Measurement Strategy Widget allow quick and easy changes to common measurement parameters with either a single feature or a pattern of features without the need to access the full feature dialogues.

This is the second of two major PC-DMIS releases scheduled for 2019, with continued service pack updates to ensure maximum reliability of the platform. PC-DMIS 2019 R2 is available to download immediately, either from the HexagonMI.com website or through Universal Updater.

 

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Hexagon Production Software Portfolio Merges Virtual And Real Manufacturing At EMO 2019

Hexagon Production Software Portfolio Merges Virtual and Real Manufacturing at EMO 2019

Hexagon’s Manufacturing Intelligence division will be showcasing digital production solutions from its Production Software portfolio at EMO Hannover 2019, the world’s leading trade fair for metalworking scheduled for September 16–21 in Germany. The highlight of the booth is a demo case that will take visitors through virtual reality, into the manufacturing processes of the future.

This year’s EMO is themed “Smart Technologies Driving Tomorrow’s Production.” It shows how digital and real manufacturing worlds merge in the production of tomorrow, and how smart technologies mesh seamlessly with each other.

Visitors to Hexagon’s Production Software stand in Hall 9 can use virtual reality glasses to see the complete construction and production of a motorcycle saddle, starting with 3D scanning through a Hexagon measuring arm and reverse engineering.

Based on the 3D model, machining is optimally programmed in the EDGECAM CAM system. The subsequent NC code simulation on the virtual machine with NCSIMUL ensures a collision-free machining process. The final program can then be transferred directly to the machine and started with no loss of time when retracting.

In the demo area on the stand, visitors will have the opportunity to get to know the extensive production software portfolio, with more than ten different software solutions, including EDGECAM, WORKNC, VISI, NCSIMUL and FASYS. The Get-Together Area on the stand offers space for exchange of experience and networking.

In addition, interested parties can register directly at the exhibition stand for individual visits to the completely newly established Production Software Experience Centre at Hexagon’s Neu-Isenburg site, to see for themselves the future of intelligent CNC production, today.

EMO Hannover 2019 will also feature further solutions from the metrology portfolio of Hexagon’s Manufacturing Intelligence division in Hall 6.

 

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Why CMMs Are Manufacturing’s Evolutionary Winners

Why CMMs Are Manufacturing’s Evolutionary Winners

The advent of new, high-performance measuring technologies could have posed an existential threat; but instead, the CMM has proven its resilience and remains key to metalworking manufacturers’ long-term strategies. Article by Sea Chia Hui, Hexagon Manufacturing Intelligence.

The DEA TORO CMMs can be employed as metrology stations in the development and engineering departments for supporting industrial design of complex contoured shapes, as well as flexible gages for process control in a shop environment.

For more than 40 years, the accuracy of coordinate measuring machines (CMMs) has guaranteed them a central role in metalworking companies’ quality control processes. The advent of new, high-performance measuring technologies could have posed an existential threat. But instead, the CMM has proven its resilience and remains key to metalworking manufacturers’ long-term strategies. This is because rather than replacing CMMs, new measuring technologies are complementing their strengths as quality control capabilities expand across the production cycle.

Adapting to Accelerated Evolution

A whole gamut of machines from smartphones and cars through to PCs have benefited from rapid technology advances that include lower cost of processing, higher performance software, and faster network connectivity. CMMs are no exception. But what makes CMMs different is their unique robustness and adaptability. A sizeable number of CMMs in use today have been in operation in excess of 20 years, kept up to date by retrofitting software and sensor systems.

At the heart of the CMM’s longevity are its unparalleled accuracy and durability, combined with an ability to be upgraded for new applications and working methods. Unlike many other machines, there is no need to replace a CMM in order to gain access to new functionalities. Manufacturers simply change a CMM’s controllers, software or sensors, while keeping their principal investment intact for years.

Increased Versatility and Cost-Effectiveness

Recent advances in measuring software, sensors and data analysis systems have played a crucial role in transforming the ease-of-use of CMMs, opening them up to new applications while increasing their measurement throughput.

One of the consistent benefits of a CMM has been its ability to provide 2-D touch probe-based measurement of unparalleled accuracy, precision and repeatability. But today’s metalworking companies often want to combine the accuracy of a 2-D probe sensor with the fast 3-D data capture offered by optical sensors.

Contactless measurement, for example, makes sense for sheet metal parts where throughput and speed of measurement are of the essence, or for metal parts on which a probe would leave an undesired mark. And because laser scanners can be used to create solid models from surface profiles, they are the ideal tool for reverse engineering and rapid prototyping.

Improvements in multisensor systems mean CMMs are ideally placed to support both tactile and 3D non-contact measurement. Crucially, manufacturers are able to opt for CMM software and machine controllers that enable seamless transfers between different non-contact or tactile sensors within a single inspection program. This enables a CMM to automatically switch between different sensors to capture a full metrological report even for complex parts.

And because software systems can be programmed to instruct the CMM to automatically change over sensors, multisensor systems can be left to run untended, whether they’re using touch trigger, optical, chromatic white light, laser point, or laser line sensors. The supporting software also makes it easy to create a graphical analysis of the captured CMM measuring data and overlay it on three-dimensional CAD models to compare the real data with the nominal data. This visual representation makes anomalies easy to identify, allowing operators to take decisions quickly on the shop floor.

And since the advent of intuitive software systems and greater levels of automation have made CMMs simpler to operate accurately, their use has been opened up to a wider range of employee skill sets and levels of experience.

Dealing with the Task in Hand

Not every application will need the same software package—much will depend on parts to be inspected and the complexity of their geometry, and the extent to which manufacturers want to analyse captured data and use it to inform their design, engineering, and production processes.

Similar factors shape the choice of a CMM, which is determined by the volumes of the workpieces to be measured, the tolerances required, and the desired throughput speed. Gantry CMMs, for example, continue to be a popular choice in the automotive, shipbuilding, and aerospace industries, because they are designed to accommodate the measurement of very large sheet metal parts. And they can be adapted to meet different accuracy and productivity requirements.

Parts such as aeroblades or car powertrain gears, for example, need to attain very tight tolerances, which requires the use of high precision CMMs. In contrast, the manufacturers of car bodies or aircraft fuselage are likely to seek a CMM optimised for throughput rather than precision.

When it comes to smaller parts, manufacturers in the metalworking industry have a choice of bridge CMMs that again provide differing levels of throughput, accuracy and flexibility, depending on the application need. Manufacturers can also consider gaining productivity benefits by installing CMMs on the shop floor.

As we have seen, the CMM’s versatility is at the root of its ongoing success, offering manufacturers the possibility to closely match a CMM’s measuring capabilities with their application needs. Whether a manufacturer is looking for an entry-level CMM or the most accurate measuring machine on the market, with the right supplier they can be confident of deploying a cost-effective CMM solution that future proofs their business for years to come.

 

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Airbus Taps Hexagon Subsidiary To Reduce Development Lead Time

Airbus Taps Hexagon Subsidiary To Reduce Development Lead Time

Hexagon subsidiary MSC Software has been selected by Airbus Group, as part of their digital transformation, to reduce development lead time by implementing an End-to-End materials management platform, MaterialCenter. Airbus intends to provide access to a one single material raw data database for Airbus Group and across its divisions.

MaterialCenter provides a complete solution for the current and future needs of aerospace materials data and process management. Designed to manage the complete materials workflow as the single point of entry for all materials related activities, it guarantees that engineers use a consistent source of approved materials derived from traceable integrated processes, resulting in improved simulation fidelity, reduced data loss and elimination of tedious manual data management activities.

MaterialCenter is highly scalable and perfectly suited to support the large number of users and the big amount of data generated and used by Airbus to engineer metallic and composite systems.

“We are extremely proud that MaterialCenter has been selected by Airbus as the End-to-End Materials Management Platform for the Group. We are looking forward to a strong, long-term partnership with Airbus as we implement and deploy MaterialCenter across the group.  This will enable an effective and efficient use of materials and materials data to drive innovative and high-quality product development,” said Roger A. Assaker, CEO of e-Xstream engineering and Chief Materials Strategist of MSC Software.

MaterialCenter is part of a comprehensive 10x Materials Solution that covers (virtual) material development, (virtual) materials testing, standard and advanced (multi-scale) material modelling serving all the major Finite Element Analysis software, effect of manufacturing (e.g. additive manufacturing (AM), automatic fibre placement, etc.), effect of defects, digital continuity and material-centric digital-twin, artificial intelligence (AI), compliance and sustainability.

 

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New High-Definition Feature Scanner For Automated Inspection

New High-Definition Feature Scanner For Automated Inspection

Hexagon’s Manufacturing Intelligence division has launched the APODIUS Absolute Camera AAC, a camera-based sensor designed for the fine analysis of large numbers of small repetitive features such as the drill-hole formations often found in large aerospace components. The sensor is specifically intended for integration within an automated robotic inspection system controlled by a Leica Absolute Tracker AT960, and can also be integrated directly within a production machine.

The AAC offers feature analysis at a finer level of detail than other non-contact measurement solutions. Accuracy is to within just 10 microns for diameter measurements, even on holes with sub-millimetre diameters – alternative non-contact measurement options available for automated integration typical struggle with holes less than 18 millimetres in diameter. And with a measurement speed of 10 Hertz, the AAC can keep up with robot movement of 100 millimetres per second, allowing it to cover a square-metre area densely populated with small features in less than five minutes.

“We’ve seen many requests from aerospace users for a solution like this,” said Jonathan Roberz, Managing Director of APODIUS at Hexagon. “Small holes can be extremely challenging to measure quickly and accurately – some customers are still using pin gauges because of a lack of better solutions, while others have to move their part onto a nearby CMM and give up many of the productivity benefits of an otherwise automated system. This new sensor offers the opportunity to finally remove such manual processes from otherwise modern automated inspection by finally delivering a system that has the accuracy these applications require in an fully automatable form.”

Within a Laser Tracker Automated Solution, the AAC can become a key part of a complete automated inspection system. It is fully compatible with a tool changer system, allowing it to be used alongside a dynamic surface scanner such as the Leica T-Scan 5 to provide automated inspection of every aspect of large components with no compromising on feature accuracy.

 

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Hexagon Simplifies Horizontal Arm CMM Retrofitting

Hexagon Simplifies Horizontal Arm CMM Retrofitting

With the DEA MERCURY FX solution, Hexagon’s Manufacturing Intelligence division has simplified the retrofitting of horizontal arm coordinate measuring machine (CMM), enabling automotive and other large part manufacturers to adopt smarter, more automated manufacturing practices while reusing their existing horizontal arm CMM guideway assets. Hexagon’s DEA MERCURY FX meets customers’ demands to combine the accuracy of horizontal arm CMMs with technology advances, such as automation and multisensor capabilities, so they can switch easily between tactile probe and non-contact measurement while capturing data that helps them improve manufacturing processes.

To help manufacturers shift to smarter working more quickly, Hexagon’s DEA MERCURY FX allows them to upgrade to the latest metrology tools and software features, while reusing their existing base tables, even if it is not a Hexagon system. Eliminating the need to replace base tables from a wide range of suppliers minimises disruption and downtime. DEA MERCURY FX is also available as a new standalone horizontal arm CMM solution for manufacturers.

“The horizontal arm CMM’s accuracy means many manufacturers want it to be part of their future automation strategy. By designing the DEA MERCURY FX for installation on existing base tables, Hexagon helps manufacturers upgrade to a horizontal arm CMM that supports features such as multisensor capabilities and the latest metrology software,” said Paolo De Bortoli, product line director, Horizontal Arm CMMs. “The move reflects our strategy to help manufacturers maximise the use of their existing metrology assets as they adopt new technologies that make their factories smarter and more productive.”

The DEA MERCURY FX is a multisensor horizontal arm CMM that supports both tactile and non-contact scanning. It enables OEMs and suppliers in the automotive, aerospace, defence and railway sectors, as well as manufacturers of large mechanical parts and earth moving machinery to continue to benefit from the precision of horizontal arm CMMs while adopting new, more automated and smarter metrology software and tools.

 

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AMendate Acquisition Helps Hexagon Minimise Time-to-Print For Additive Manufacturing

AMendate Acquisition Helps Hexagon Minimise Time-to-Print for Additive Manufacturing

Hexagon’s Manufacturing Intelligence division has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire AMendate GmbH, a German-based start-up providing simulation software solutions that support the generation and optimisation of designs for additive manufacturing. AMendate will join Hexagon’s MSC Software business, a provider of computer-aided engineering (CAE) simulation software and services.

With this acquisition, MSC is positioned to offer its customers a paradigm shift away from general purpose optimisation technologies to an innovative, purpose built software solution for additive manufacturing. Enabling the efficient production of highly complex components and providing customers with numerous benefits, from material-saving, weight reduction and efficient, cost-effective production. AMendate’s technology eliminates the inefficient manual effort that significantly slows today’s workflows, allowing work steps to be completed in days that would otherwise take several weeks.

“The AMendate acquisition directly addresses a major obstacle during design for companies shifting to additive manufacturing processes,” said Paolo Guglielmini, CEO, MSC Software. “It enhances our Smart Factory solutions by minimising time-to-print. We are proud to welcome AMendate to the MSC team, and we look forward to what we will accomplish together.”

“With MSC being one of the most renowned developers for software solutions in CAE, we are incredibly excited to introduce our generative design technology to its customers,” said Dr. Thomas Reiher, CEO and co-founder, AMendate. “The integration of AMendate’s software in MSC’s established simulation technologies such as Simufact and MSC Apex will enable us to further enhance our technology even faster and make its benefits available to a global audience.”

AMendate was founded in 2018 by a team of experienced researchers from Paderborn University and the Direct Manufacturing Research Centre (DMRC) in Paderborn, an industrial/academic consortium started in 2008 by Boeing, EOS, and other commercial partners.

The AMendate transaction is expected to close early third quarter and subject to customary closing conditions.

 

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Hexagon Highlights New Technologies And Innovations At HxGN LIVE 2019

Hexagon Highlights New Technologies And Innovations At HxGN LIVE 2019

Hexagon AB is hosting HxGN LIVE 2019 this week, a four-day technology conference featuring new technologies and innovations, at The Venetian in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. HxGN LIVE brings together thousands of Hexagon customers, partners, and technology experts from industries and backgrounds around the world.

“Hexagon has a far-reaching vision for putting data to work to reverse the trend of resource depletion and waste overwhelming Earth’s systems,” said Ola Rollén, Hexagon President and CEO. “By empowering an increasingly autonomous future, our ‘do well to do good’ approach will drive sustainability through efficiency gains, increased safety, improved productivity and less waste — the very business outcomes our customers seek.”

Leaders from Hexagon’s business units will be announcing new technology products and industry partnerships during keynote presentations on Wednesday, 12 June. The 2019 Hexagon Honourees will be recognised during the event. This year’s award winners embody a spirit of innovation, partnership, and technological advancement through impact on their businesses, the industries they serve, and communities locally and globally.

Listed below are this year’s honourees with a brief description of why they won:

  • AI: Extending autonomous vehicle technology to benefit vertical markets such as construction, manufacturing and more.
  • Beijing Benz Automotive Co. Ltd (BBAC): Working to create an advanced intelligent quality system for auto manufacturing.
  • Bombardier Aerospace: Implementing virtual assembly techniques that validate components through critical compliance areas.
  • Canadian Natural Resources Ltd: Supporting projects that develop quality of life and economic health in the communities where it operates.
  • Censeo: Using georadar technology to create less invasive repair and inspection methods.
  • Corbins Electric: Creating and sharing best practices to innovate not only for the company but also the entire industry.
  • CP Police Service: Ensuring one of the best-performing and safest railways in North America.
  • Frequentis: Building solutions to make location-intelligence information available throughout organisations.
  • Fresnillo: Creating an integrated tech portfolio for mine planning, operations, enterprise, and survey and monitoring needs.

“Our customers are change makers and force multipliers, and we are pleased to celebrate this year’s Honourees for their innovative contributions,” said Rollén. “Their stories inspire and motivate all of us at Hexagon.”

 

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