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The Recipe For Centennial Success

The Recipe For Centennial Success

Ahmad Alshidiq speaks with Martin Reichenecker (Chief Sales and Marketing Officer and Spokesman of the Board) and Borries Schϋler (Chief Product Management and Engineering Officer) from The Hoffmann Group on the company’s recipe for standing strong for 100 years.

Martin Reichenecker (Chief Sales and Marketing Officer and Spokesman of the Board)

Borries Schϋler (Chief Product Management and Engineering Officer)

The Hoffmann Group is a leading system partner for quality tools, combining trading with manufacturing and service expertise. It supports over 135,000 customers with supply capability, assured quality and enhanced productivity in meeting all their needs for machining tooling, clamping, measuring, grinding, as well as workstations and storage and personal protective equipment.

This year, the headquarters based in Munich is celebrating its centenary with excellent prospects. In 2018, the Hoffmann SE with its subsidiaries achieved record sales of more than EUR1 billion, the number of employees grew to more than 3,000 and the company is continuing to grow organically. Hoffmann SE develops and steers the corporate strategy and orientation of the entire Hoffmann Group together with its long-standing partner companies. In 2018 the Hoffmann Group comprising Hoffmann SE and its partners generated a turnover of more than EUR1.4 billion and employed approximately 3,700 people.

100 years in the industry is a significant milestone. What has Hoffman done right to be an industry leader for such a long time?

Martin Reichenecker [MR]: For 100 years, we’ve been flexible with our offerings and products. Today, we are the number one in Europe in quality tools, cutting tools, hand tools, metrology, etc. I think what has brought the company success is we are always focussing on the clients´needs, trying things and learning fast. We’ve been pioneer in some fields of tools distribution. We had our first printed catalogue in back in 1936 and in 1998 we established the first web shop in the industry. There has always been a good combination of traditional, well used and modern aspects (in our offerings) which helped the company to reach a revenue of more than EUR1 billion in 2018. We are also serving many different industries, not just any particular one.

Borries Schϋler [BS]: We also employ the right people that grasp Hoffmann’s philosophy in serving our customers.

Any changes Hoffmann has made in this era of Industry 4.0 from what they offer previously?

MR: In 2009, we already had our first wave of digitalisation called 360-degree tooling and provided our customers with electronic tool files across a complete cutting tool assortment. And we also started building data-based solutions for our customers.

What’s your most breakthrough technology and why is it important to the industry?

MR: Two years ago, we launched the high performance drills GARANT Master Steel SPEED and FEED and opened up a new performance class allowing the customer productivity rates. It was not so normal that time. Another technology from Hoffmann is the TPC and the Parabolic Performance Cutting – a further development of ball-nosed slot drilling cutting and also known as barrel milling. These solutions offer customer high productivity.

BS: In August this year, we will be launching our new constant grid dimension. Today, different manufacturers have different grid dimensions for cabinets, work benches, trolleys and so on. And from Hoffmann, you will get all the items in the same grid dimension. This will offer you space for customisation and long-term investment protection, and this is a technical step ahead as it is a complete system. With the GARANT GridLine series, the Hoffmann Group is now the first supplier to offer a completely integrated modular concept in its product range, which includes even the smallest details such as partitioning materials and rigid foam inserts for drawers.

Hoffmann’s own brand GARANT is one of the biggest tool brands in Europe, it is the only brand with which you can completely equip the whole workshop. Customers have given trust to this brand and they know we are delivering everything – whether it is cutting tools, metrology, hand tools, grinding discs or workshop equipment.  With GARANT, you have one brand with the whole portfolio for your mechanical production.

Where do you see the biggest opportunity for Hoffman in the forthcoming years?

MR: Hoffmann became very international in the last 15-20 years, having expanded from countries in all over Europe to North America, and to Asia. We are a young and small player in some markets but the opportunity is huge for us. Product-wise, we still have a lot of ideas on what can be brought into the market. And last but not least, on process optimisation for customers. From application to ordering process, we want to optimise the whole process end-to-end.

What’s your strategy in Southeast Asia?

MR: We learned a lot about the market in the past year, and we discussed and adjusted our approach in the region – much focus is on Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam and Indonesia.

What is most important in addressing present-day challenges in digital manufacturing?

BS: I would take it a bit wider with digitisation, completely. I think digitalising internal processes can be handled; it’s just a matter of time and how many resources you have. In developing digital business models, you have to have the right people and certain creativity in your staff. For me, the challenge will be when you have a higher transparency of data and team members have to take bigger decisions in a shorter period of time. You have to have the right people who can perform this when time calls for it.

Milestones For The Hoffmann Group

1919 – Josef Hoffmann registered a company in Munich.

1932 – Franz Hoffmann joined his father’s company. He shaped the company for more than 60 years.

1936 – The first catalogue revolutionised the industry.

1973 – The introduction of the GARANT brand turned Hoffmann, the reseller, also into a manufacturer.

1993 – Foundation of the Hoffmann Gruppe, which has been called the Hoffmann Group since 2003.

1995 – First steps over the border: Hoffmann went international.

2000 – Started its online business.

2009 – Opening of Europe´s and the industry´s largest and most efficient logistics centre.

2018 – Further expansion: construction started on the LogisticCity in Nuremberg.

2019 – Hoffmann is preparing for the next 100 years: with digital products and services.

 

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EMO 2019: ANCA To Launch Latest Generation Of ToolRoom Software

EMO 2019: ANCA To Launch Latest Generation Of ToolRoom Software

Leading cutting tool manufacture Fraisa, reduced set up from hours to five minutes through the new tool balancing feature in ANCA’s new ToolRoom RN34. A specially designed software package for the aerospace, die mould, general machining and power generation industries, the product will officially launch at EMO 2019. Customers can get improved productivity or minimise chatter through the intuitive design of high performance, complex endmills.

“ToolRoom RN34 is aimed to be the differentiator among many suppliers of endmill manufactures in the industry by allowing customers to design complex geometries through software to achieve increased tool life, productivity, cutting volume and increased quality and precision of the workpiece” says Thomson Mathew, ANCA Software Product Manager.

The constant helix ballnose option, for example, is replaced by a graphical drag-and-drop designer. This ballnose type of tool, with optimised irregular helix curves to reduce vibration, and with near-instant visualisation easily achieved by switching from the 2D projection of the cutting edge to the 3D.

Douglas Franke, Fraisa Production Manager said: “with ANCA’s balancing software we have a tool balanced generally within five minutes. Some of our more complex tooling can take a little longer – up to 20 minutes. This drastically decreased our time in setup on the machine which could take several hours. Our biggest success story has been an aerospace customer who is running our 1” aluminium roughing tool at 25k rpm.”

Lights Out Manufacturing To Be ANCA’s EMO Theme

Toolmakers have always been subject to technological change. Today the future of tool making innovation goes by many names. The Factory of the Future (FoF), the Smart Factory, or Industry 4.0. Whatever it is called, there’s one common factor: it’s revolutionary, and it will redefine and optimise manufacturing processes. ANCA will be showcasing its technology so tool makers understand how they can Build their Factory of the Future at EMO.

  • Reduce wasted materials and time through 3D simulation.
  • Increase grinding efficiencies through informed, data led decisions.
  • Reap the benefits of lights out manufacturing with affordable, easy to use robots.
  • Achieve 100 percent tool accuracy through automated in process measurement.

For tool manufacturers this will be a new landscape that places big data analytics and interconnected technology at the heart of daily work. It means streamlined business operations that allows rapid expansion into new and emerging markets and technology throughout the process to remove the need for human intervention.

Change will not happen in one radical moment. For almost 50 years ANCA has been on the journey to help our customers move towards a smart factory solution. Every world-first technology development we’ve introduced, from 3D simulation software to Laser Plus, our in-process measurement system, to RoboTeach, which makes robotic loaders accessible and easy to program, has been iterative rather than completely revolutionary.

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Smart Data In The Metalworking Industry

Smart Data in the Metalworking Industry

The metalworking industry is entering a new era where new forces created by the explosion of data, robotics, automation, and artificial intelligence (AI), amongst others, are changing the dynamics for manufacturing companies. Article by Stephen Las Marias.

To be successful in this new environment, manufacturers should consider a paradigm shift, focusing on innovation, integration of new technologies, and collaboration with their partners—and even with the competition—to build new solutions and take their production to the next level.

And that’s where key transformative technologies such as big data, analytics and the Internet of Things (IoT) come in. Industry 4.0—our nascent industrial generation—represents digitalisation across all operational processes. Industrial IoT (IIoT), in particular, describes an integrated system of systems where sensors and actuators provide specific data such as measurements, timing, and equipment status, all connected and visible throughout the enterprise.

In this scenario, we’ll see the convergence of operations technology (OT) in the factory floor with information technology (IT) in the enterprise, all working together towards a single purpose—a more-efficient, profitable and successful manufacturing operation. With IIoT, companies will be able to view real-time data on their manufacturing processes, and compare performance across their plants, or even shifts within their plants. They can also quickly scale their production up or down; manage their energy consumption; and even manage, troubleshoot and fix their processes and plants, even when they are located in different parts of the world.

Data is what’s powering this. Seamless exchange of data between automated machine processes, including manual assembly, and testing, to name a few, provides clear visibility of the operations of this ‘smart factory’.

According to Mariano Kimbara, senior industry analyst for the Industrial Group of Frost & Sullivan, data will be the new value-multiplier for the factory. “Factory owners will strive to network various aspects of a plant, such as tools, assets, material, people, process, and services, on one digital platform. The level of integration and collaboration will offer customers unprecedented information visibility and subsequently generate value from domains that were generative before,” he said.

Making Use Of Data

Data plays a key role in all of these. As metalworking equipment manufacturers produce more and more sophisticated machines, with multiple sensors providing all the necessary data to ensure the health and performance of the machine, measurement, tracking, monitoring, inspection data—users today, on a daily basis, are grappling with more data than they ever did a decade ago.

With Cisco forecasting more than 50 billion connected devices by 2020, it is expected that there will be a deluge of data coming from these connected systems of systems. Which means a mindset shift is required when it comes to deciding what to do and how to leverage these data to improve your manufacturing operations.

Having all these data from your more sophisticated machines and tooling equipment is good, but the challenge is finding that relevant data that will provide you an actionable intelligence that you can implement to improve your processes.

According to Thomas Jakob of Bosch Software Innovations, this begins with sourcing for data creatively. He said companies can impel a more comprehensive look at information sources by being specific about problems they want to solve or opportunities they want to exploit. This means identifying and connecting the most important data for use in analytics, followed by a clean-up operation to synchronise and merge overlapping data, and then working around the missing information, according to him.

Once the information is in your hands, there are many ways how this will help you in your road to smart manufacturing. First is through preventive and predictive maintenance. Majority of the metalworking machines are now equipped with sensors that collect many different types of data, such as operating time and the conditions of the components and parts. Having these data provides users the knowledge on whether a part is no longer functioning efficiently and therefore needs replacement. Or, if a certain job is more tedious than the previous one, the machine will have to be rested for a slightly longer period than that required of the previous job. These things will help keep your metalworking equipment running efficiently, smoothly, and prevent machine downtime.

According to Bob Gill, general manager for Southeast Asia at ARC Advisory, the proportion of machine tool time actually taken up by cutting metal is generally less than 40 percent and can even be as low as 25 percent. He said that it can be difficult to accurately pinpoint the causes of all that non-productive machining time because most machine shops are performing manual, post-production data collection. In a smart factory, where your machines are constantly releasing production data, you will be able to gain intelligence on the impact of machine stops and tool changes in production, and as such plan more effectively and efficiently to improve machine uptime and utilisation.

Another benefit that you can get out of your smart data is energy usage. Smart machines provide data on their energy usage. Based on this, you will have the information when to ramp up production based on energy demand. Moreover, machines could power down when not in use.

And last but not least, quality control and assurance. With smart data, manufacturers will know whether a particular machine is not performing properly by comparing information about its performance to previous jobs. Or in case there are particular products that are not according to specs, users will be able to trace back where the process ‘faltered’, which resulted to production mistakes.

Industry 4.0 is here—and manufacturing operations can significantly benefit from utilising IIoT, smart data, and analytics. Building the right kind of technologies and expertise to apply them is critical for everyone to be competitive in this new industrial landscape.

 

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Making Use Of Big Data

Making Use of Big Data

Data is a key to start the journey towards Industry 4.0, and robust analysis of machine data can enable efficiency-optimized production, and potentially lead to new business models. Article by Beckhoff Automation Pte Ltd.

Industry 4.0 is a buzzword that was invented back in 2011. Eight years on, the industry has very much moved on from defining the term towards actual implementation.

Industry 4.0 essentially covers a wide scope, from organizational processes down to the production machines, with each part needing to play its own role in reaching towards the end goal—creating a smart factory. However, before any intelligence can happen, one should not neglect the foundation of it all, collecting suitable and sufficient data.

Another term that we commonly encounter these days is ‘big data’. Giant IT companies such as Facebook and Google have recognized that collecting and analysing huge amounts of data in a target-oriented manner delivers valuable benefits. The same experience and technology is slowly making its way to the manufacturing or metalworking industry.

Analysing machine data brings forth some benefits to the overall manufacturing process, such as allowing the system to accurately predict potential machine failures, or monitoring and reporting machine performance, just to name a few. Ultimately, the company will be able to achieve cost savings with predictive parts change, and machine performance data can help to identify areas of improvement in the production process. In addition, targeted improvement actions can be taken.

Dealing with Legacy Systems

Let’s delve deeper into data collection on metalworking equipment. Majority of the metalworking equipment that are being used nowadays are still standalone. They are not connected in any way to a central server; parameters and machine data are mainly stored locally within the controller. Companies are facing challenges to collect data from such equipment because the machine controller can either be locked, no interface for third party system connection, or just way too old. Having said that, there are still equipment in the field that are open, and companies can tap onto the existing controller to retrieve any available data.

In order to overcome such challenges, companies may resolve to one of the following options to collect data from the equipment:

  • integrate with existing controller if it’s open;
  • add auxiliary system with additional sensors onto the machine; or,
  • retrofit the machine controller to a newer system.

While multiple options of implementation are available, it is common to have a mix of solutions and multiple brands of equipment in the plant, each running with a different controller model. This also means that integration of a variety of protocol is expected. In such a diverse environment, any system added to the equipment for data collection is recommended to run with open standards, especially the types of communication protocol supported.

The data acquisition system should also be flexible enough. The system should cater for future expansion, as such projects are most likely to be implemented in phases. Users should also be able to specify if they would like the data to be stored and analysed locally, or transmitted to the server or cloud for further storage and analysis. Companies should always keep the end goal in mind, taking into consideration that the system deployed at the equipment level should be ready to connect with the systems at the IT level, be it a manufacturing execution system (MES) or an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system, to achieve final overall integration.

Simply generating enormous amounts of data is not enough, these data volumes also have to be managed. With proper analytics tool, companies can translate raw data into meaningful information that can be used to improve their production processes, improve product quality and save maintenance cost.

For example, bearing is one of the components in the machine that requires replacement most often, and usually vibration of the machine is monitored to predict bearing failure. Hence, with sufficient amount of vibration data, companies can then better predict when the bearing is most likely to fail with the trends observed, and execute parts change only when required. Another example will be the monitoring of energy used by the equipment—having such data will help in identifying areas for potential energy savings, and to better plan the production to maximize savings.

These are just two of the many benefits that can be achieved with data collection. When exploring solutions for data collection and analysis, system integrators are starting to look at PC-based control to handle the large amount of data expected, something a conventional PLC may not be able to achieve.

In conclusion, with the variety of solution available in the market, companies should always work with open standards and flexible system for their metalworking equipment. Data is indeed a key to start the journey towards Industry 4.0, and robust analysis of machine data can enable efficiency-optimized production, and potentially lead to new business models.

 

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Marposs Supports The DIGIMAN Project

Marposs Supports The DIGIMAN Project

Marposs is strongly supporting the DIGIMAN project, an initiative that aims to address the industrial scenario, outlined by the Industry 4.0 paradigms, through the development of Cyber Physical Systems. These systems respond to market demands with a framework that embraces and completes the machine (physical part) by pairing an Augmented Manufacturing Platform or AMP (Cyber Part). The platform interfaces with processes and machines, through appropriate modules with high engineering content, which then formalises the knowledge of operators and experts while leveraging learning skills.

The Industry 4.0 plan promotes the development of intelligent and connected products to create systems that are part physical and part virtual (Cyber Physical Systems). A recent estimate states that by 2020, the value of 4.0 solutions, proposed by the supplier ecosystem, will be around €420 billion. Approximately 80-100 percent of production facilities could be using these solutions by 2025, with a potential annual cost savings of US$900 billion to US$2.3 trillion.

The main objectives of the DIGIMAN project are the ability to improve, even in real-time, the quality of products and the ability to infer on the state of the process (machines and components) by proposing improvement strategies (Virtual Operator). The partnership between MUSP (manufacturing process expert), MISTER (IoT and software solution expert), and CNR-ISTEC (ceramic materials expert) is complemented by an industrial partnership: machine and component manufacturers as well as end-users.

 

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How Industrial Robots Increase Sawing Productivity

How Industrial Robots Increase Sawing Productivity

More and more metalworking companies are now relying on integrated automation in their production. And the same thing is happening when it comes to sawing technology. Article by KASTO Maschinenbau GmbH & Co. KG.

More and more metalworking companies are now relying on integrated automation in their production. And the same thing is happening when it comes to sawing technology. The use of industrial robots offers great potential for handling the sawn sections: The mechanical helpers can take on numerous tasks, from picking to deburring, weighing, centring and marking to sorting and stacking. This provides more flexibility and performance in production, better working conditions and significantly lower operating costs.

Across all sectors, the demands placed on metalworking companies are steadily increasing: They must have a high production flexibility from batch size one to large-scale production, process more and more different materials and dimensions—in excellent quality and at the lowest possible cost. Those who want to be permanently successful in the ever tougher international competition must organise all their production processes in a variable and efficient, but also efficient way.

Countless Uses for Robots

Sawing technology plays a key role in metal processing and offers many opportunities for optimisation. More and more operators of sawing systems are intelligently linking their work processes and automating them with robot support. The benefits are obvious: Industrial robots are fast, reliable and precise, and if necessary, they can work 24 hours a day without human intervention. They don’t get tired or fall ill, and they can handle a wide range of tasks when equipped with the necessary tools. “Our robots help us with a number of handling and conveying tasks and efficiently perform many machining steps,” says Volker Bühler, group manager for robotics at the sawing and storage technology specialist KASTO.

Automation starts right with material feeding. The material to be cut is conveyed to the machine by means of suitable equipment, for example roller conveyors or magazines, thus sparing workers the effort of lifting and carrying, and reducing the risk of injuries. Depending on how it is equipped, the sawing machine itself can also run attended. Material is fed to it automatically, and an intelligent machine control system sets all parameters, such as cutting length and cutting speed, based on the job data. State-of-the-art production saws can thus carry out a variety of jobs in sequence, with different materials and diameters, and operate autonomously for long periods.

Removal, Machining, Stacking—Automatic from Start to Finish

Industrial robots also have considerable potential when it comes to handling and processing finished cut parts. For example, they can remove them from the machine, thus relieving workers of this repetitive task. When equipped with appropriate tools, robots can also perform tasks like deburring, chamfering, marking, centring or measuring workpieces. Cut parts can be weighed, sorted by size or job, and stacked on pallets or placed in containers. The parts can also be transferred directly to a driverless transport system. “For complex processes involving various work steps, we also use combinations of different robots and clamping devices,” explains Bühler.

When large quantities of material are sawed with only a few different component geometries, it is relatively easy to automate the downstream processes. The situation is different with custom sawing involving diverse materials and dimensions.

“The greater the variety, the harder it is to cover all the possibilities,” says Bühler. The choice of robot tools is an important factor. A robot must be able to deal with all the objects it encounters while using as few aids as possible. This reduces procurement costs, minimises idle times and increases productivity. Users have a choice of mechanical, magnetic or vacuum-operated grippers. The grippers should be as compact as possible to give the robot easy access to the cut parts.

Sawing Technology on Course to Industry 4.0

With the help of the right components, sawing can be combined with other automated operations to create complex, highly integrated systems that are seamlessly connected in a continuous material flow. This includes upstream storage as well as downstream handling and processing. For example, KASTO implements combined storage and sawing systems for its customers in which all storage, handling, sawing, marking, palletising and bundling processes are completely automated—from storage of the raw material to retrieval of the cut parts. The control software can be linked to existing ERP systems like SAP for greater transparency and efficiency. Sawing can be integrated with other processes like turning or milling in digitised, self-configured production systems such as envisioned in Germany’s Industry 4.0 initiative.

Automated sawing technology offers significant advantages to users. Many processes can run unattended and much faster, which increases productivity and reduces the need for personnel. It is easier to make up the difference when employees are ill, and robots can keep working even during breaks or after shifts. The result is lower personnel costs and greater flexibility in terms of capacity utilisation.

Companies can react more easily to order peaks and dramatically reduce idle times. This can make a big difference economically.

“We’ve calculated that, depending on the shift model, an investment in an industrial robot with a machine like our KASTOvariospeed saw pays for itself in less than a year,” says Bühler. “When you consider that systems like this are used for more than ten years on average, users can reduce their operating costs for a very long time.”

Benefits for Both Users and Customers

Robot technology also helps to improve working conditions. It relieves employees of heavy, tiring and monotonous tasks. The risk of accidents and injuries is reduced. Moreover, the cut parts are of better quality, because robots machine them with equal precision, sort them reliably and stack them neatly. This provides benefits not only for operators of automatic sawing facilities, but also for their customers.

 

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MTA Vietnam 2019 Opens New Opportunities For Precision Engineering And Manufacturing Sector In The Industrial Revolution 4.0

MTA Vietnam 2019 Opens New Opportunities For Precision Engineering And Manufacturing Sector In The Industrial Revolution 4.0

Vietnam mechanical industry is predicted to be a potential sector to catch up with the sustainable development of worldwide industry in the fourth industrial revolution. Being along with this industry through years, MTA is supposed to be the Vietnam premier trade event for Precision Engineering, Machine tools and Metalworking. The exhibition is held on July 2nd – 5th, 2019 at Saigon Exhibition and Convention Center (SECC), promised to display a strong line-up of cutting-edge products together with different interesting additional activities.

Vietnam Mechanical Industry Are Gradually Affirming Its Position In Industrial Revolution 4.0

As Vietnam powers past the first half of 2019, its growth remains stable within the context of slowing global economic growth faced with increasing challenges, contentions and risks. At the end of 1Q19, Vietnam’s GDP growth reached a commendable 6.8 percent, with the industrial and construction sectors contribution at 8.6 percent – the highest rate amongst all key Vietnam industry sectors. The industrial sector looks set to lead GDP growth over the near term as Vietnam has maintained her appeal for foreign direct investment in the manufacturing and industrial sectors.

While the world is progressing to the fourth industrial revolution, manufacturing level of Vietnam industry is still at the first stages and limited by new technologies, information, skill and infrastructure. However, if the enterprises know how to take the advantages of opportunities and are facilitated to develop, Vietnam mechanical industry is predicted to be a potential sector to catch up with the sustainable development of worldwide industry in the fourth industrial revolution. Besides, mechanical enterprises should actively renovate their technologies and collaborate with different partners to maximise the efficiency in working. With strong supporting and beneficial policies from the government and associations, the new industrial era would be easier to reach.

MTA Vietnam 2019 – Catching Up With Worldwide Industrial Innovation

MTA Vietnam makes it return as 17th edition and has asserted its position for the last 16 years as the premier precision engineering, machine tools and metalworking exhibition in Vietnam which meets the innovative demands of global tendency. With exhibition area is expanded to Hall A3 and reaches 13,900sqm, the event will showcase a number of industrial products serve for precision engineering, machine tools and metalworking industry provided by different suppliers from around the world. This year’s event attracted more than 514 exhibitors from 22 nations and regions with popular labels such as: Amada, Beijing Jingdiao, Bystronic, Cybertech, Dine Vina, Hypertherm, Hwacheon, Jinan Bodor, Knuth, Mazak, Marposs, Mitsubishi, Muratec, Nikon, Shandong Leiming, Sandvik, Sodick, Renishaw, Takamaz, Trumpf, Van Su Loi, Viet Vu, VPIC Viet Phap, Yamada,… and many others.

MTA Vietnam 2019 honourably welcomes 14 international group pavilions from countries with strong technological development such as: United Kingdom, Taiwan (3), Germany (2), Korea (5), Japan, Singapore and Thailand. Taiwan group pavilion has the biggest exhibition area with over 60 exhibitors attend. Korea is the nation that attracted the most associations with five international group pavilions include more than 50 companies to come and promote their products. Besides, United Kingdom is a brand new international group pavilion which is established for the first time in Vietnam, with supporting from Engineering Industries Association (EIA).

A place to exchange knowledge about science and technology

Technical seminars and conferences are alongside activities which attracted a plenty of visitors at MTA Vietnam. With the topic entitled: “New trends of metal forming technology”, technical seminar is hosted by the organiser: Informa Markets Vietnam and prestigious speakers from top-rated businesses such as: Dr. Ngo Cong Truong, Founder and Professional Director, John&Partners JSC; Mr. Pham Duc Hiep, Sales Manager, Trumpf Vietnam Co., Ltd; Mr. Garry Chuang, Sales General Manager, Bystronic; Mr. Hoang Minh Dong, Manager, Amada Vietnam Co., Ltd and Mr. Naoya Ogawa, Area Manager of ASEAN and Oceania, Murata Machinery Ltd.

Multi Engineering Solution Laboratory – MES LAB has continually accompanied with the seminar series at MTA Vietnam and brings the topic titled: “PRODUCT DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT – PROCESS AND TECHNIQUES TO IMPLEMENT FOR R&D AND INNOVATION TEAM”, conducted by Dr. Tran Anh Tuan (CEO MES LAB) and MES LAB Team. The program is hoped to bring interesting sharings about product design & development process by new technology.

Experiencing our industry 4.0 introducing booth called: “We are Industry 4.0 ready!”

This booth is opened with the aim to introduce products reach industrial 4.0 standard from the exhibitors. With the criterion: “Nine pillars of Technological Advancement that forms the basis for Industry 4.0”: Big Data and Analytics, Autonomous Robots, Simulation, Horizontal and Vertical System Integration, The Industrial Internet of Things, Cybersecurity, The Cloud, Additive Manufacturing, Augmented Reality (Source: Boston Consulting Group 9/4/2015), the products which have one of above standards will be displayed at this special booth. Through short videos and introduction, this is supposed to be a chance for the exhibitors to approach visitors more effectively.

This special booth welcomes 22 popular brands such as: 3D Smart, Amada, Bejing Jingdiao, Cybertech, Kita Sensor, Mazak, Nam Sơn, Nikon, Siemens, Trumpf, Woosung, ZWSOFT,… and many others to attend and showcase their products.

Click here to see show photos taken by the APMEN Team.

 

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Schuler Delivers TwinServo Machine To V- ZUG AG

Schuler Delivers TwinServo Machine To V- ZUG AG

From the manufacturing process to die technology and value streams: As part of a comprehensive consulting contract, Schuler analysed the press shop of V-ZUG AG in detail. The recommendation to increase productivity was the investment in a 1,000 metric ton press with TwinServo technology. At the end of 2017, V-ZUG AG ordered the system that Schuler is now delivering.

Presses with TwinServo technology are driven by two separate torque motors in the press bed. The electronically synchronised drives are arranged in such a way that there is still plenty of room for the scrap chutes. The extremely high tilt resistance, combined with the reduction in deflection, leads to an improvement in the quality of the parts, reduces stresses on the die, and shortens the die tryout times.

So far, all sheet metal parts for the products of V-ZUG AG – such as washing machines, dryers, ovens, steamer and dishwashers – have been produced on hydraulic presses. The declared goal now is to gradually transfer the production to the servo press: “The coil line is designed in such a way that the machine can process all kinds of sheet,” explains Häfliger, “from galvanised sheet steel to the mirror-smooth chrome steel surface.”

Thanks to Schuler’s advice, the change of the dies with a weight of up to 32 metric tons and a size of six by two meters, which automatically move from the warehouse to the press, is reduced to less than 15 minutes: “Our employees are trained to handle every move”, says the project manager. “That allows us to produce even the smallest lot sizes.”

V-ZUG AG attaches particular importance to the fact that the machines – in which approximately ten kilometers of cable are laid – are prepared for the requirements of Industry 4.0. For this reason, Schuler not only used state-of-the-art bus systems and decentralised installation techniques, but also IO-Link-capable sensors. This means that the setting data of the sensors are programmed in the control and can therefore be exchanged without having to be readjusted by the service personnel.

The destination of the press, at the same time headquarters of the customer, is the city of Zug in Switzerland, located about 20 kilometers south of Zurich. Because there are many construction sites on the way to Zug, Schuler has to dismantle some of the installed components so that the heavy load can pass through the streets and bridges. During the construction of a hall for the first of the two machines, V-ZUG AG left a side wall open in order to drive in the large parts sideways on rails. The start of production is scheduled for the end of September 2019.

 

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ExOne And Siemens Partner To Bring Industry 4.0 To Industrial 3D Printing

ExOne And Siemens Partner To Bring Industry 4.0 To Industrial 3D Printing

The ExOne Company is partnering with Siemens to bring Industry 4.0 to industrial 3D printing, benefiting industrial customers in the foundry, aerospace, automotive, energy, and other markets.

Siemens’ Digital Enterprise Portfolio of software and automation technology including MindSphere are fully implemented on ExOne’s new S-Max Pro sand printer, which can achieve print speeds of up to 135l/h (18s/layer). The S-Max Pro is being launched at the 2019 GIFA International Foundry Trade Fair this week at the Messe Düsseldorf in Germany.

“With this expanded partnership, ExOne will deliver even more value to our foundry and manufacturing customers who rely on our industrial 3D printers,” said ExOne CEO John Hartner. “We are proud to be the first industrial 3D printer to fully integrate the latest of Siemens control, sensing and motion technologies and this new MindSphere technology, which will give our customers a new level of control and plant integration.”

Dr. Karsten Heuser, Vice President of Additive Manufacturing at Siemens Digital Industries, said, “We are proud to further strengthen our partnership with ExOne and advance the industrialisation of additive manufacturing. Siemens brings new digital technologies and its profound industrial domain knowhow to help ExOne generate further value. The new ExOne S-Max Pro 3D printer proves that seamlessly integrated software and automation solutions result in shorter time to market, higher performance and maximum availability.”

The Digital Enterprise portfolio from Siemens comprises integrated hardware, software and services supporting ExOne to leverage the benefits of Industry 4.0. In the centre of this holistic approach stands the ‘Digital Twin’ using a shared data model alongside the entire value chain: from the machine concept over machine simulation, engineering and commissioning to operations and services. Machine operators secure their investments with shorter lead times, increased machine performance and smarter service decisions.

The ExOne APP ‘3D Live’ runs on MindSphere, the open cloud-based IoT operating system from Siemens to analyse machine data and other relevant information in real-time, providing the basis for automated or timely decision-making, turning data into value. As an example, ExOne machines enable the operator to identify anomalies for improving maintenance and repair activities so that unplanned downtime can be avoided.

“We look forward to working with Siemens to further our capabilities in delivering production solutions for industrial 3D printing. Together we will help our customers integrate our systems into new smart factories and integrate with those already deploying Siemens’ technology,” Hartner added.

 

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Adapting Cutting Tools To Changing Trends

Adapting Cutting Tools To Changing Trends

In an interview with Asia Pacific Metalworking Equipment News, Jacob Harpaz, ISCAR CEO, IMC President and Chairman of the Board, discusses the current trends in the metalworking tool industry, and how the company is helping their customers address their manufacturing challenges.

Jacob Harpaz

APMEN: Could you provide us with an overview of the trends that are shaping the metalworking tool industry?

Jacob Harpaz: Developments such as electric vehicles and powertrains in large volumes, additive manufacturing and cyber connectivity will mean significant changes in the style of machining and the materials being used. Workpieces will be produced more commonly at near net shapes for final machining and finishing.

By 2030 there will be big changes in the automotive sector. The major OEMs are moving away from the internal combustion engine which will mean much less metal removal will be required. There will be wider use of composite materials and the introduction of 3D printing will also mean less metal removal. At ISCAR we are preparing for these changes. Cutting tools will have to adapt to remove less metal but at much faster speeds and feeds.

Industry 4.0’s impact will not just come through sophisticated new technology such as sensors, process monitoring and acquiring machining data, but in the integration of factories and the supply and distribution of consumables used in manufacturing and products leaving the factory.

APMEN: How has ISCAR kept up with these trends?

Harpaz: ISCAR’s motto of “Machining Intelligently” represents the ongoing process of developing new products for increased productivity.  Our aim is to provide our customers with the latest technology to bring down costs.  ISCAR’s strategic philosophy is ongoing R&D that drives our business growth. As soon as we introduce to the market our newest tooling families, another team from the R&D division focuses on designing tools that will compete with these latest tools

ISCAR recently launched its “LOGIQ” cutting tools campaign featuring highly advanced cutting tool solutions for productive, high quality and efficient manufacturing in all sectors.

APMEN: What are the top three challenges that your customers are facing?

Harpaz: First, machining logically and intelligently is closely connected to today’s smart factories and the current cyber age. The cyber revolution is here, and Asian shops should quickly embrace what Industry 4.0 really means. They need to move beyond seeing Industry 4.0 as just a slogan, and this will take open-mindedness.

Next, companies need to maximise efficiency to stay ahead. They should be developing methods to collect, analyse and leverage data and utilising appropriate tools to cut faster or reduce setup, as well as implementing inventory systems that reinforce the aim of 24/7 machining. ISCAR’s “LOGIQ” product range helps to realise these goals.

Third, the ISO 13999 standard affects CAM procedures on production floors all over the world. Producing metal parts productively and profitably requires many technological changes to ensure that the process is followed correctly. To address this challenge, customers need online data such as the information that appears in ISCAR’s electronic catalog, which features assembly options.

APMEN: How are you helping them address these challenges?

Harpaz: ISCAR embraces a business culture that nurtures, strengthens and maintains strong ties with our customers. We aim to improve profitability and productivity for large and small manufacturers alike, facing every challenge as an opportunity to expand our range of solutions through focused R&D, production excellence, and close cooperation with customers to ensure the right product for their needs.

ISCAR introduced a milling tool assemblies option in E-CAT, its comprehensive electronic catalog. This new option represents a highly valuable instrument for the preliminary process in selecting tools at the design and planning stages of machining. Cutting tool data can be gathered accurately and used to create twin representations of the tools. Creating a digital twin representation of a tool assembly based on ISO 13399 facilitates the accurate communication of tool information between software systems. The assemblies are accessible in both 2D and 3D files, and the files can be downloaded directly from E-CAT on the ISCAR website.

Integrating this new function into the user’s CAM software can prevent errors on the shop floor during machining, while the ability to plan multiple tool assemblies saves time and costs in the planning process.

While we always provide the latest technology to machine the part, the productivity advantage of this technology only matters if you have the tool at the right place at the right time.

APMEN: How do you position ISCAR in the metalworking tools market in Asia?

Harpaz: The Asian market is important and presents its own challenges and opportunities; ISCAR welcomes every challenge as an opportunity for continued research and development of effective cutting solutions that match market developments and requirements.

Our commitment to combining innovation with reliability and cost consciousness, together with our wide market knowledge and penetration and a uniquely strong – and global – corporate culture, enables us to stay at the forefront of the industry and to provide our Asian customers with optimal, cost-effective solutions to their needs.

 

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