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New Lease On Life For Battery Swapping In Electric Vehicles

New Lease on Life For Battery Swapping In Electric Vehicles

 

Limited charging speed and availability have been major barriers to electric vehicle adoption, and fast-charging stations are currently the most popular way to quickly add range to vehicles. However, the additional power demands can stress the electrical grid, prompting reconsideration of other solutions like battery swapping, according to new analysis from Lux Research, a leading provider of tech-enabled research and innovation advisory services. Although battery swapping failed nearly a decade ago, it is now being considering for supporting taxi fleets in urban environments.

Lux’s new report, “Cost Comparison of Battery Swapping and Fast Charging for Electric Vehicles”, analyses and compares costs for deploying battery swapping infrastructure to support electric taxis in cities and offers insight on how promising battery swapping can be as a fast-charging alternative. Lux developed and used a model to perform a cost analysis of infrastructure supporting an electric fleet of taxis in two different countries – the UK and China.

“Instead of quickly charging the battery, battery swapping solutions aim to physically replace a depleted battery with a charged one,” explains Christopher Robinson, Director of Research at Lux Research and lead author of the report. “Battery swapping can address two main challenges with fast charging: It slowly charges depleted batteries to minimize grid impact and battery degradation, and it allows for faster addition of range in electric vehicles.”

Using the model developed by Lux analysts, the report drew several interesting conclusions:

Battery replacement costs are crucial for keeping costs low for any infrastructure. Faster charging minimizes taxi downtime but increases the rate of battery degradation. Factoring in battery replacements due to faster charging makes 50kW charging the cheapest form of charging.

Battery swapping is most competitive for large fleet sizes. In China, battery swapping is the cheapest and fastest solution for powering electric vehicles, even in small fleets of just 100 vehicles, while in Europe, the costs are roughly equal.

China has cemented its position as a leader in battery swapping deployments and will remain the most promising region for the technology. Due to a combination of favorable economics, local companies that have commercialized the technology, and favorable government policies, clients should closely watch activity in the region as a leading indicator of adoption elsewhere.

As battery swapping networks grow, new opportunities for cost reduction emerge. While fast charging stations have the benefit of a decade of deployments and refinement, battery swapping is still in its nascent stages, with deployments accelerating rapidly over the past two years.

 

 

The 3D Printing Market Will Reach $51 Billion In 2030

The 3D Printing Market Will Reach $51 Billion In 2030

3D printing has the potential to significantly disrupt traditional manufacturing, as it is increasingly being used beyond prototypes, moulds, tools, or other one-off parts. The total 3D printing market will reach $51 billion in 2030, driven mainly by growth in production parts, according to new data from Lux Research.

Lux’s new report, “Will 3D Printing Replace Conventional Manufacturing?” highlights the 3D printing market size and growth by application and material, provides an outlook on what 3D printing means for the future of manufacturing, and discusses how strategies and business models will evolve as well.

“3D printing will be a key in the future manufacturing landscape thanks to benefits that it can bring over injection moulding, machining, casting, or other conventional methods,” explains Anthony Schiavo, Research Director at Lux Research and one of the lead authors of the report. “These benefits include customisation and personalisation, the ability to create complex geometries, part consolidation, and in some cases lowering costs.”

The value of 3D-printed parts will rise at a 15 percent compound annual growth rate (CAGR) over the next decade, from $12 billion in 2020 to $51 billion in 2030. “The largest share of this growth will be in end-use parts, which are just 23 percent of the market today but will reach 38 percent share in 2030,” notes Schiavo.

“The medical and dental industries will account for the largest share of end-use parts, reaching $4.5 billion in 2030, followed by aerospace at $3.9 billion.”

As 3D printing for manufacturing matures, strategies will shift. Vertical integration is critical today, but horizontal specialists can capture more profits in the future. Due to the relative immaturity of 3D printing as a manufacturing technology, complete well-integrated ecosystems are needed to help make it competitive.

 

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Battery Electric Vehicles Will Be Less Reliant On Lightweighting By 2030

Battery Electric Vehicles Will Be Less Reliant On Lightweighting By 2030

Battery electric vehicles (BEVs) are poised to be the future of the auto industry. Looking toward the future of BEVs, a new report from Lux Research, “Electric Vehicle Lightweighting 2030,” analyses the future of vehicle lightweighting and necessary BEV success factors over the next decade.

In the past, lightweighting – or purposely designing more lightweight cars specifically for fuel efficiency – has been a key tool for improving the fuel economy of internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles. However, the transition from ICEs to BEVs changes both the goals and the design considerations around lightweighting.

Anthony Schiavo, Senior Analyst at Lux, states, “BEVs are overwhelmingly more efficient than ICE vehicles due to regenerative braking and more efficient motors and are increasingly outgrowing the issue of limited range. Materials companies need to start planning for a fully mature BEV space.”

Lux predicts that battery pack energy densities will increase by roughly 15 percent over the next decade. This increased energy density can be used to either extend the range of a vehicle by keeping battery size the same or reduce cost by shrinking the size of the battery pack. In its analysis, Lux modeled both scenarios and calculated a lightweighting benchmark. Lux determined that in order for lightweighting to be a cost-effective solution against batteries by 2030, it will need to cost, on average, less than $5 per kilogram of weight saved.

“This benchmark is not the only thing guiding lightweighting decisions,” cautions Schiavo. “To find adoption, materials companies and manufacturers will need to find solutions that save on both weight and cost.”

“We predict vehicle structure will be an opportunity for high-strength steel and aluminum, as they provide weight reductions at minimal cost,” Schiavo continues. “Bumpers are expected to benefit from design advancements that utilise glass fiber, carbon fiber, and thermoplastics. Other material priorities, such as sustainability, durability, and end-of-life issues, however, will take priority over lightweighting by 2030.” Lux found that there’s far more risk of disruption from improving energy storage technologies – which could substantially outstrip forecast improvements by 2030 – than there is from novel innovations in materials.

For other exclusive articles, visit www.equipment-news.com.

 

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