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Sandvik Invests In Leading AI-Powered Manufacturing Software Provider Oqton

Sandvik Invests In Leading AI-Powered Manufacturing Software Provider Oqton

High-tech engineering group Sandvik has acquired a minority stake in the privately owned American company Oqton, a leading provider of AI-powered manufacturing solutions that allow manufacturers to manage, optimise and automate their manufacturing workflows.

Oqton provides a secure end-to-end, cloud-based platform that links data across the manufacturing ecosystem – from design, to production, to logistics – to help users understand, optimise and drive these highly interdependent, but traditionally siloed, processes. This open cloud platform combines order tracking, computer-aided manufacturing (CAM), scheduling, manufacturing execution systems (MES), Internet of Things (IoT) technologies and production traceability into one platform, enabling manufacturers to operate agile factories that manage complex product mixes, with lower inventory and a simplified supply chain.

​​​​​The management team welcomes the transaction, which will provide Oqton with a strong industrial partner that will accelerate opportunities for growth. The financing will be used to further develop Oqton’s platform, while expanding its commercial partnerships in multiple domains and verticals, such as additive manufacturing, robotic welding and CNC machining.

Sandvik’s customers  – regardless of their size  – share similar challenges in manufacturing. Striking the difficult balance between flexibility, effective machine use and minimising waste, all while facing a​ lack of manufacturing insights,​ can restrain productivity.​

Oqton’s solution targets inefficiencies and waste in processes throughout the manufacturing workflow.​ ​It is unique in that it combines several manufacturing software capabilities (CAD, PLM, CAM, IOT, MES, QMS) into a single platform, enabling an unprecedented degree of AI-powered automation and optimisation.

Users can automatically capture expert knowledge and eliminate repetitive tasks, access technologies remotely and across multiple sites, and optimise production planning to improve utilisation and quality. Being fully integrated, users can also link the platform to their traditional technologies, such as CNC, welding, and post-processing machines for a truly end-to-end manufacturing solution, making their processes faster, more adaptable, and more cost-effective.

“This investment is in line with our strategic agenda to broaden our offering in digital manufacturing. We are looking forward to working with Oqton and finding ways to expand our offering for increased customer productivity by creating new products that take advantage of Sandvik’s extensive know-how of manufacturing processes and Oqton’s AI-powered manufacturing solutions”, says Stefan Widing, President and CEO of Sandvik.

“Sandvik will help us scale globally with both a direct and indirect sales approach. We truly think time has come for the manufacturing space to embrace the cloud and we are working hard to facilitate this,” explains Ben Schrauwen, CEO of Oqton.

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Whether Simple Or Complex: Motor Control Systems For Manufacturing Automation

Whether Simple or Complex: Motor Control Systems for Manufacturing Automation

New motor control systems from igus ensure a speedy start-up of linear and rotational systems.

Setting up control systems to drive axes is usually time-consuming and can require software programming knowledge. To help manufacturers address this issue, igus has developed two new cost-effective and easy-to-operate control systems so that users—from all areas of industry—can quickly start up their motorised drylin E drive axes. The D3 dryve controls simple linear or rotational axes with DC motors without any software or a PC. For more complex travels such as with multi-axis robots or delta robots, igus offers the D1 dryve, which is a control system for stepper motors, DC motors and EC/BLDC motors. The motor control system can be modified live or simply operated via a web browser.

Industry 4.0, Internet of Things (IoT) and M2M are fields calling for real products and solutions that promote factory digitalisation and automation. With its low-cost automation range, igus offers myriad solutions for a variety of applications. In its drylin product range, igus has been offering lubrication-free linear axes with matching stepper and DC motors for several years. From low-cost solutions, for very simple movements, to rails made of stainless steel, igus offers a large diversity of options to suit any application requirement.

Depending on the process, the customer is supplied with the axis or linear robot that will best meet their requirements. With drylin E, users can deploy the already-configured lubrication-free linear or rotational axes, which are ready-to-install and can be motorised in different installation sizes as a single axis, or a linear robot structure in the case of format and height adjustment systems or pick-and-place applications. For easy control and operation of the axes, igus’ D3 dryve offers a motor control system for simple movement and the D1 dryve a motor control system for more complex tasks. This allows a variety of tasks to be automated without the need for advanced programming.

D3 dryve: Quickly Set, Directly Automated

The D3 control system was developed to perform simple tasks quickly and cost-effectively. The control system is designed for all standard DC motors.

“When developing the D3 dryve, we mainly focused on enabling a simple, user-friendly start-up for anyone,” explains Rene Erdmann, Head of Business Unit drylin E Drive Technology.

No licences or software are needed for installation of the control system as all functions have been integrated into the device directly. Simply connect the control system to a 24V power supply and set the operating mode, end-position switch-off, and the motor current by means of DiP switches. The speed can be adjusted with an integrated rotary controller. Current-limiting is done by means of a screwdriver with another controller. Once made, the settings are permanently stored. 

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The Best Manufacturing Technology Trends From 2020

The Best Manufacturing Technology Trends From 2020

Trend is generally defined in one of two ways. Firstly, it might refer to a general direction in which something is heading or developing. Alternatively, it might be seen as synonym for fashion. Here, John Young, APAC director at automation parts supplier EU Automation, looks at some of the key manufacturing trends from 2020 and assesses which of these are mostly likely to play a more prominent role in 2021 and beyond.

Here to stay (at home)

By forcing businesses to facilitate remote working during lockdowns, the pandemic has encouraged a cultural shift. As the vaccine rolls out in 2021, don’t expect companies to return to previous levels of onsite working. Aided by digital technologies, manufacturing has experienced some of the benefits of remote working and greater flexibility.

Teleoperation can take many forms, but one interesting growth area in 2020 has been remote controlled vehicles in industrial settings. For example, a forklift truck can be equipped with cameras and sensors and controlled remotely by a driver working at the desk from home.

A helping robotic hand

Robot installations continue but the key growth area has been collaborative robots, or cobots. In comparison with more traditional industrial robots, cobots are smaller and are designed to be used safely alongside human workers. The uptake of this technology in metalworking and the automobile sector looks set to continue. Ford, for example, now uses cobots to install shock absorbers, freeing up human workers for more strategic tasks.

Much of this trend is in fact being driven by small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs). The size and startup costs of industrial robots shut out these companies from taking advantage of this area of automation. Cobots are small enough to be deployed in factories where space is at a premium and they require less initial investment, allowing businesses to increase their investment incrementally.

Smart learning about your suppliers

In a year where global values chains have faced unprecedented uncertainty, those companies that were quickest to embrace digital technologies in their supply chain management have braved the storm more readily.

Machine learning algorithms and their use in predictive maintenance is not an entirely new phenomenon, but its application continues to grow. As a supplier of automation parts, one growth area that has stood out for me is the use of machine learning algorithms to analyze supplier behavior, predicting when to expect a part from a supplier based on past patterns. This can improve inventory management and cash flow.

Let’s get personal

Increasing customization is being driven from both demand and supply side forces. On the demand side, customer behavior is showing preferences for greater levels of customization and personalization. The shift toward products-as-a-service business models and the ability to access and analyze large volumes of data about customer behavior is allowing manufacturers to understand this demand better.

On the supply side, there are many technological innovations that are allowing nimble manufacturers to incorporate greater customization. For example, ABB has implemented a manufacturing facility that revolves around cells of automation, in contrast to the traditional, linear production line. Instead, robots move from station to station for higher levels of customization.

Intelligence on the edge

Edge computing involves locating computer processing of data as close to the source of the data as possible. According to research by Gartner, around ten percent of enterprise-generated data is created and processed outside of traditional centralized data centers or the cloud. It is estimated that this figure will rise to 75 per cent by the middle of this decade.

Deployed intelligently as part of a blended or hybrid data architecture, edge computing can enhance predictive maintenance capabilities. For example, smart sensors deployed on industrial motors and pumps can enhance monitoring in real-time, alerting plant managers when it is time to contact a reliable parts supplier like EU Automation.  By locating the AI in the sensor itself, manufacturers save on cloud subscription services, enhance their cyber security and protect their operations from power outages.

5G rolls out and rolls on

5G is being rolled out, but its full potential will continue to roll on as it enables more and more manufacturers to transition to Industry 4.0 and the Industrial Internet of Things. 5G, one hundred times faster than 4G, is not just a trend in itself, but a key enabler of many other technological innovations and something that will profoundly impact manufacturing over the next decade.

Here in Singapore, an interesting early application is a project involving IBM, Samsung Electronics, Singaporean telecommunications company M1 and Singapore’s Infocomm Media Development Authority. The collaboration is designed to pilot 5G manufacturing use cases, as part of the country’s Smart Nation Initiative.

To give just one example from this project, 5G is facilitating the use of augmented reality (AR) for factory field engineers carrying out preventative maintenance. Without the speed of 5G, these engineers would lose hours of productivity in downloading the right AR model or require several technicians on site to resolve and issue that could be tackled remotely.

Fashion trends come and go but some trends are here to stay. 2020 has seen the increasing use of many technological innovations in manufacturing that will become increasingly prominent over the next few years. From 5G to cobots, companies large and small across the APAC region are leading the world in their adoption of Industry 4.0 and automation technology.

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How To Make Sure That Tools And Moulds Build Perfect Parts

How to Make Sure That Tools and Moulds Build Perfect Parts

This article discusses how to guarantee that manufactured parts correspond to the production requirements. Article by Creaform.

At the beginning of a manufacturing process, a mould, die, or jig is engineered according to the theoretical CAD model. The aim of this tooling, made precisely from the nominal model, is to produce parts that correspond to the technical requirements. It turns out, however, that there are often differences between the theoretical model and the reality of an industrial environment. Different phenomena interfere with the tooling, causing problems and imperfections on the parts. Adjustments and iterations, therefore, are required to ensure that the tools and moulds, even if they correspond exactly to their nominal models, produce good parts that meet quality controls and customer demands.

Challenges: Non-Predictable Phenomena

The reality of an industrial environment differs from the theory illustrated in CAD models. During the manufacturing process, several phenomena that are difficult to predict can occur. Spring backs when stamping a die, shrinkage when building a mould made of composite material, or thermal forces when welding two elements together are all good examples of phenomena that impact tooling precision. Nevertheless, modelling the removal of a composite resin, the spring back of a die, the impact of a weld remains difficult, complex, and expensive.

Initially, the tooling is built according to the theoretical model, which is developed to create manufactured parts that meet the production requirements. But, in the reality of the industry, the aforementioned phenomena interfere with the moulded or stamped parts. As a result, the parts do not meet the technical demands and must be adjusted, corrected, and altered in order to pass the quality controls.

Starting with nominal models is, of course, a good first step, but let’s not forget that what manufacturers want is not so much a perfect tooling, but good parts that meet technical requirements and customer needs.

Solution: Iterative Process

When unpredictable phenomena alter manufactured parts, an iterative process of quality control starts. The most commonly used method is to work on the part before adjusting the tooling. More precisely, this method involves producing a part, measuring it, and analysing deviations between the part and the CAD model. Hence, if we notice that there are some missing (or extra) mms in one place, we will go to the corresponding surface on the mould, die, or jig in order to grind or add material. Thus, the iteration is performed on the tooling after measuring the manufactured part.

Once this operation completed, we restart the manufacturing process in order to produce a new part that will be measured to verify if there are any remaining deviations. This iterative process will continue on a loop until we obtain the desired part (i.e., when the manufactured part corresponds to its CAD model).

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ANCA’s Third Tool Of The Year Competition Celebrates Modern Cutting Tools That Shape Our World

ANCA’s Third Tool Of The Year Competition Celebrates Modern Cutting Tools That Shape Our World

With 28 entries, 1.2 million social impressions and almost 4500 votes, ANCA’s Tool of the Year celebrates the contribution modern cutting tools make to manufacturing, surgery, woodworking and other diverse industries. The competition shines a light on and celebrate these tools that shape our world.

Pat Boland, ANCA Co-Founder said: “The cutting tool sector has faced a significant challenge with the onset of COVID-19. In these conditions it is even more important to promote and recognise our contributions as an industry. This year we saw the most complex and sophisticated entries to date. Having been part of the industry for over 40 years, the technical advancements demonstrated by cutting tool manufacturers continue to amaze.”

“I think of ANCA’s Tool of the Year as the Oscars for cutting tools and am proud to take the time to recognise and reward the creativity and skill of manufacturers globally,” Pat continued.

Winner of ANCA Tool of the Year – ARCH Cutting Tools

The overall winner, ARCH’s entry demonstrated excellent use of multiple iGrind operations with several complex profiles. The tool came out in front of others when compared to the DXF and measured on the Zoller for Profile OD and Runout. The surface finish measurement on the Alicona produced a superb result. The tool also stood out in terms of complexity of grinding and was a large diameter (1”) multi-functional cutting tool with many features. Overall the tool was complete – ticking every box to be the Tool of the Year winner and was an exceptional effort from the team at ARCH.

“We entered to present and showcase our capabilities as a cutting tool manufacturer and to demonstrate the complex capabilities of the ANCA Tool and Cutter Grinder,” said Jim Gray, President and General Manager, ARCH Cutting Tools – Latrobe.

Winners of Virtual Tool Category – JG Group and Turcar

“Both tools showed a high level of effort, artistry and creativity. When creating the Virtual Tools, both Turcar and JG Group used their imagination along with the power and flexibility of ToolRoom RN34 and CIM3D V9 to produce works of art,” Pat concluded.

Grzegorz Reszka CEO, JG Group said: “Achieving the Winner status, among the world class tool grinding companies makes us more marketable and gives us exposure on new global markets. It was an amazing opportunity to present our capabilities to the wider audience, worldwide and evidence of what JG Group Experts can provide for our customers. Congratulations to all Participants and the Winners!”

Tarık Öztürk, Chief Technology Officer at Turcar said: “This year we wanted to come up with something different and that is why we named our entry Katana, meaning the best work of the world – a value we brought to this competition.”

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Collaborative Robots Open New Horizons In Quality Control Processes

Collaborative Robots Open New Horizons In Quality Control Processes

Today, with manufacturing in real need of flexible solutions, applications of the latest human and robot collaboration are highly demanded. By: Darrell Adams, Head of Southeast Asia & Oceania, Universal Robots

Across different sectors and regulatory environments, all manufacturers need to ensure consistency of product. Conducting inspections on business-critical systems ensures that the loss of quality and production stoppages are prevented. Collaborative robots (cobots) offer suitable solutions to manufacturers. Hence, cobot-based quality control and inspection systems that can transition between different end products in very little time has become very attractive.

Flexible operation with cobots

Manufacturers are constantly striving to meet the quality control demands of high-mix and low volume production runs. Easy to incorporate into existing production lines and a cinch to program, UR cobots are uniquely positioned to deliver results in fast-moving quality control environments. With the ability to shift from pick and place and handling roles to inspection tasks quickly, cobots are easily reconfigured to inspect new parts. This makes cobots the perfect technology for both future-proofing inspection processes and ensuring business continuity in difficult times. This operational flexibility extends to human-robot collaboration. Human-robot teams will improve the accuracy of quality control operations while human workers can be reassigned to more interesting tasks.

One of the world’s largest manufacturers of bathroom accessories and auto parts, Xiamen Runner Industrial Corporation in China, has installed 64 UR robots to upgrade the efficiency of the production process. Before deploying UR robots, most operations at Runner Corporation were manual with operator fatigue posing risks on both safety and product yield. The company was devoted to developing a highly efficient, flexible, and reliable production line. Ever since the deployment of UR robots, Runner Corporation has witnessed a sharp increase in its product yield while redeployment of staff positions effectively helped reduce the company’s employee turnover rate. The UR robots enabled automated production with unprecedented flexibility.

Improvement of quality and productivity on production lines

Meanwhile, Japan-based Koyo Electronics Industries, a member of the JTEKT Group who boasts the world’s top share in the automotive steering bearings, deployed UR robots to improve quality and productivity. The company has been consistently involved in the development, manufacturing, and sales of electronic equipment since its establishment in 1955, continuing to create products that surpass reliability and functionality standards. In the production of products that require strict quality, the challenge has become how to increase productivity according to an increase in demand.

As such, UR3 cobot was introduced in the touch panel quality inspection process. The cobot works with higher accuracy and stability as compared to human workers, this drives improvement in the quality of work. In fact, for in-vehicle products that require strict quality standards, productivity has also increased 31 percent due to the operational stability of the cobot. The experience from implementing UR cobots has built confidence and high hopes for future development within Koyo Electronics.

Easier quality control (QC) related cobot deployments

UR cobots are proven technologies for quality inspection applications and success stories like these abound. With the launch of the new UR+ Application Kit platform, designed to help manufacturers streamline cobot deployments by providing proven software and hardware for the most popular cobot applications, QC-related cobot deployments are made easier with the addition of kits such as the Q-Span Workstation Kit. The Workstation is a flexible solution for quality control measurement inspection developed by UR partners at New Scale Robotics. The system’s measurement resolution of 2.5 µm (0.0001 inches) enables manufacturers to improve precision, consistency, yield, and quality in small-part measurement.

As customer expectations and demand increases, manufacturers aim to maintain quality standards and focus on delivering products efficiently without sacrificing quality. Whether manufacturers are looking for a way to ensure business continuity or shifting production to new products with different inspection requirements, cobots are ready to help make automated quality control processes easier to deploy and more efficient than ever.

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Sandvik Coromant Appoints New President

Sandvik Coromant Appoints New President

Sandvik Coromant has announced Helen Blomqvist as its new President, succeeding Nadine Crauwels.

As president, Helen will be responsible for enhancing Sandvik Coromant’s leading position in manufacturing tools and machining solutions and sharing the knowledge that drives the manufacturing industry forward. Helen will report to the newly appointed President of Sandvik Machining Solutions, Nadine Crauwels, and will be a member of the Sandvik Machining Solutions Management Team. She starts her new position on 1 December 2020.

Blomqvist has a solid background with Sandvik Coromant and joined the company in 2003 as a research engineer. In her 17 years, she has held various managerial positions in Product Management and R&D, as well as in sales — having been the General Manager for Sales Area North Europe. She holds two patents and in 2018, she was awarded Sandvik Coromant Leader of the Year.

Blomqvist is a Swedish national and holds a PhD in Structural Chemistry from Stockholm University.

“I am pleased and honoured to have the opportunity to lead Sandvik Coromant, a company with a fantastic position for products and solutions that are adding value to our customers. I look forward to working with Sandvik Coromant’s management team, employees and partners to continue to develop our offering, our innovation power and to implement our strategy to lead the industry forward and shape the future of the manufacturing industry. My focus will be to strengthen our role as market leader.” says Blomqvist.

Sandvik Coromant owns over 3,100 patents worldwide, employs 7,00 members of staff and is represented in 150 countries. For more information on Sandvik Coromant, please visit the Sandvik Coromant website for the latest news.

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Growth Opportunities In Singapore’s Precision Engineering Sector

Growth Opportunities In Singapore’s Precision Engineering Sector

Despite the ongoing pandemic, Singapore’s Precision Engineering (PE) Sector has offered close to 1,500 job opportunities from more than 270 companies since April this year, according to the Ministry of Manpower (MOM).

The PE industry is an integral part of the global manufacturing economy. It supplies critical products and expertise to manufacture complex components and equipment used in industries such as semi-conductors, medical technology, marine, offshore and aerospace. In Singapore, the PE industry employs more than a fifth of the 473,000 workers in the manufacturing sector and contributed approximately $38 billion in total output in 2019.

Furthermore, the industry continues to see pockets of growth—the PE cluster grew 11.4 percent in the period January to July 2020 compared to the same period last year. Companies which performed better includes the Medical Technology and Semiconductor sectors which saw an increase in demand of COVID-19 related products like ventilators; companies that supply machinery and systems as well as precision modules and components that make up tech appliances to facilitate remote working; companies that provide digital solutions.

The government will also be enhancing its Scale-up SG scheme with funding raised from 70 to 80 percent until September 2021. The scheme which was launched in July 2019 has helped 42 businesses develop and execute growth plans and aims to help another 50 companies in the next two years.

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Metaltech And Automex 2020 To Go All Virtual As Physical Shows Move To 2021

Metaltech And Automex 2020 To Go All Virtual As Physical Shows Move To 2021

METALTECH & AUTOMEX , originally scheduled to take place from 10 to 13 November 2020 at Malaysia International Trade & Exhibition Centre (MITEC) Kuala Lumpur, have been rescheduled till 23 to 26 June 2021.

The organiser of the events—Informa Markets’ decision was made in light of the uncertainties currently posed by the global pandemic and the subsequent travel control measures that disrupted most business activities and restrained the participation of international exhibitors and visitors to the physical event. Influential players from the Malaysian manufacturing industry have echoed their support to METALTECH & AUTOMEX 2021, promising a greater comeback to the show floor.

Instead, METALTECH & AUTOMEX will be debuting a virtual exhibition this year which will be held from 10 – 12 November 2020, starting from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

“We are pleased to launch the first-ever METALTECH & AUTOMEX 2020 Virtual Exhibition aimed to keep the all-important Malaysian Manufacturing Industry connected with our prestigious brands while assisting industry players and manufacturers to collaborate, sharing best practices and adopt a cost-effective methods in growing their businesses digitally,” said Mr. Gerard Leeuwenburgh, Country General Manager of Informa Markets in Malaysia.

METALTECH & AUTOMEX Virtual Exhibition is designed to replicate the appearance of a live event which creates a virtual presence of exhibiting brands to ensure a realistic and immersive experience for both exhibitors and visitors to connect in a non-restricted virtual space. Customised exhibition booths and structures are available across the platform, where visitors can conveniently visit and browse the exhibitor’s offerings.

In addition, the virtual exhibition includes an interactive online business matching platform where buyers can engage in a meaningful real-time conversation and information sharing with all the exhibitors through a one-on-one session in a live chatroom.

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Industrial Robots VS Cobots—Which Is Right For You?

Industrial Robots VS Cobots—Which Is Right For You?

Industrial robots have offered benefits to many organisations ever since it was first introduced, but collaborative robots (cobots) have been a game-changing force recently. Article by Darrell Adams, Head of Southeast Asia & Oceania, Universal Robots.

Cobots made automation accessible and affordable for many organisations for whom traditional robotics were out of reach. But automating appropriately means evaluating your specific situation to make the best choice. The industry is changing rapidly, and new robotic capabilities are blurring the lines between collaborative and industrial robots. Now, manufacturers must determine whether an industrial robot or cobot is best suited for the job.

Robots and cobots: The key differences

The simplest way to understand how cobots and industrial robots differ is that cobots are designed to work alongside human employees, while industrial robots do work in place of those employees. A cobot can assist employees with work that may be too dangerous, strenuous, or tedious for them to accomplish on their own, creating a safer, more efficient workplace without eliminating factory jobs involved in the actual fabrication of a product. By contrast, industrial robots are used to automate the manufacturing process almost entirely without human help on the manufacturing floor. This, in turn, frees up employees for more meaningful tasks that are less mundane and are less prone to repetitive motion injuries.

Cobots are also easily programmable as compared to industrial robots because of cobots “learning” capability on the job. A factory worker can re-program a cobot simply by moving the arm along the desired trajectory. From there, the cobot will “remember” the new movement and be able to repeat it on its own. Industrial robots cannot be so easily reprogrammed and require a programmer to write new code for any changes in the process to be implemented.

Industrial robots can handle heavier, larger materials like those used in automotive manufacturing, but also require safety cages to keep humans out of the workspace. However, cobots are designed to work in close proximity to humans, they are safe enough to function around people and do not require the same kinds of safety infrastructure industrial robots do (upon risk assessment).

Common Manufacturing Industry Misconceptions

Robots have a lot going for them in terms of reducing safety risks to employees, improving efficiency, and cutting overhead costs, but unfortunately, there are several misunderstandings about the best solution to incorporate robotics. For example, purchasers occasionally expect their cobots to replace low-skilled factory workers entirely or take on heavy manufacturing tasks best suited for an industrial robot. Cobots are specifically designed to work in conjunction with human workers and perform best as a minimally disruptive solution to safety concerns and efficiency inhibitors. Cobots have so much greater potential to revolutionise manufacturing when implemented correctly.

Another area that brings confusion is in regard to customisation options and costs. Cobots and industrial robots can both be customised, but due to their size and differences in capacity and application, one should not expect the cost or engineering required for both machines to be analogous. Some cobot brands have customisable pre-engineered designs that reduce the cost and time necessary for tailoring an automated solution to the application, however, some operations will inevitably benefit more from greater levels of customisation. Industrial robots are also available in both custom and standard models depending on the application, and these larger and more complex robots have a proportionate cost associated with them. Cost and the necessary engineering involved is entirely dependent on the needs of the customer, and being open to a wide array of solutions is the best approach to robotics.

Robotics is a considerable investment for businesses. There are arguments for both industrial robots and cobots. Although the truth is that there is a steady shift from robots to cobots, but both machines remain significant in different factory floors. Manufacturers need to understand the differences between both machines and select one based on their application needs. There is space on the market for both robots and cobots but the power lies in one’s requirement.

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