skip to Main Content
Siemens Collaborates With Morf3D To Accelerate Adoption Of Metal AM

Siemens Collaborates With Morf3D To Accelerate Adoption Of Metal AM

Morf3D is collaborating with Siemens Digital Industries Software to promote the use of additive manufacturing (AM) in advanced design, engineering, and production qualification of metal-based product innovations across a variety of industries. This collaboration equips Morf3D with Siemens’ end-to-end AM software solution from the Xcelerator portfolio and makes Morf3D a preferred Siemens AM partner with access to software in advance of the market. In exchange, Morf3D will provide technical feedback to enhance Siemens’ product development.

“The goal of this agreement is to facilitate the advancement of an end-to-end digital solution and develop new strategies for advanced engineering and design,” said Morf3D CEO Ivan Madera.

“By partnering we can leverage our unique integrated system of work to accelerate the adoption of additive manufacturing for development and production of new applications in a variety of industries. Siemens and Morf3D make a good team to accomplish this goal. Siemens has the end-to-end software to drive applications from design through 3D printing, and Morf3D has the expertise in AM operations to leverage that software so we can qualify and deliver those applications with optimal efficiency.”

“Additive manufacturing is a viable technology for innovation in all industries. But, to achieve truly industrialised AM production takes more than technical capability. The industry needs partnerships like our collaboration with Morf3D, where ideas, know-how, AM technology, software and most importantly, people, come together to advance the art of the possible by rolling up their sleeves and fully delivering on new and inspiring applications,” said Aaron Frankel, Vice President of the AM Program for Siemens Digital Industries Software.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has amplified the importance of additive manufacturing as a technology for rapid-response innovation. However, the financial uncertainties brought on by the pandemic have made it more difficult for companies to invest in AM operations and application development. We want to help those companies by giving them the resources and know-how they need to realise their dreams for additive manufacturing,” said Madera.

For other exclusive articles, visit www.equipment-news.com.

 

Check these articles out:

Siemens Addresses Overheating Challenges in Additive Manufacturing

Industrial Robotics Market Outlook

Data Literacy In Heavy Industries

VinFast Deploys Siemens’ Full Portfolio To Deliver Cars Ahead Of Schedule

Global Forging Market To Reach US$96B By 2025

Siemens Adds Augmented Reality To Solid Edge 2020

Ultimaker’s New Software Solution Helps Overcome Barriers In AM Adoption

 

WANT MORE INSIDER NEWS? SUBSCRIBE TO OUR DIGITAL MAGAZINE NOW!

FOLLOW US ON: LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter

 

 

IDTechEx: Will Low-Cost Metal Additive Manufacturing Printers Be Successful?

IDTechEx: Will Low-Cost Metal Additive Manufacturing Printers Be Successful?

Metal additive manufacturing has seen many trends over recent years including pushing the (build) envelope and deposition rate to higher levels, broadening the materials portfolio, and expanding into new markets. According to IDTechEx, one trend that cannot be overlooked is the number of product launches for low-cost “desktop” variants; but the question is, will they be successful?

It is well-known for polymer 3D printing that the hobbyist market, which, although popular and great for engagement, is not where the value lies. The majority of the market value is and will be based in industrial applications. Metal additive manufacturing currently services high-value industries, most of the printers sold are powder bed fusion and can cost over $1 million with expensive powder feedstocks. The industry is forecast to have a fall resulting from COVID-19 before rising to significant levels, according to an IDTechEx report, Metal Additive Manufacturing 2020-2030.

The high price-tag for current metal printers has kept it in the realms of high-value industries such as aerospace and defense, and medical. Powder bed fusion processes are gaining traction in other sectors, such as energy, but require time to find the economically viable use-cases. There are a large number of alternative printer processes emerging, including directed energy deposition (DED), metal binder jetting, material jetting, and more. The report highlights all the main players and benchmarks the different processes against each other, allowing the gaps in the market to be observed.

According to IDTechEx, one recent trend is the release of “desktop” or cheap/affordable metal printers. Here we are not talking about systems costing around $0.5 million and targeting small-to-large part production but rather those at ca$100,000 or below. These small printers are designed to make this technology more accessible and ideal for research, prototyping, and small replacement parts.

There are numerous players entering this field with different processes. The bound metal approaches of Markforged and Desktop Metal grab most of the headlines, although there are others extruding pellets (rather than filaments) and Rapidia with a “water bound” approach. Then beyond that, there are players like One Click Metal (a TRUMPF spin-off) making low-cost powder bed fusion machines and the likes of Meltio and InssTek making directed energy deposition units utilizing wire and powder feedstocks, respectively.  Some companies have their whole business model around these low-cost printers whereas others have them as more as a secondary side project, the issue comes with the economics.

To make these printers a success, large annual sales volumes are needed which means a far greater adoption than has previously been observed. The follow-on sales from materials will not be as significant and the “simple” designs will result in less servicing, installation, and training fees. The counterpoints are that there will be software services and a replacement market which could be beneficial with a large installed base.

There are also printer limitations that are quick to be overlooked, IDTechEx notes. For bound metal processes, this includes necessary debinding steps (which brings solvent considerations, cost implications, and part thickness limitations) and consolidation in a sintering furnace (bringing impact on size, time, and cost). The same is true for other processes and although they are not deal-breakers (and there are constant innovations progressing this), it does mean they are not the small, cheap, “plug-and-play” printers initially perceived.

Then there is the important question of what the adoption will be like. This is unchartered territory and although the products are at an attractive price point, and there are good early signs, the market potential has many barriers to be truly realized. The competitive landscape is heating up, the complicated legal history between Markforged and Desktop Metal is well documented and given both have significant funding and valuations there is clear confidence in the potential. It should be noted that both players have other offerings that could prove more lucrative in the longer-term.

Beyond the bound metal printers, Markforged are major players in 3D printing of continuous fiber composites. Desktop Metal also entered this field in late 2019 with their Fiber printer, and there are many more new and established players developing this technology. This includes a wide range of fiber integration, material choices, and design opportunities.

 

For other exclusive articles, visit www.equipment-news.com.

 

Check these articles out:

Global Metal 3D Printer Market Outlook

Metal 3D Printing Revolutionises Valve Design and Manufacturing

Vietnam: A New Crossroad In Manufacturing Industry

DOST Metals Industry Research and Development Center Is Mass Producing 5000 Face Shields Daily

Mouldmakers Turn To Process Automation In Race To Recover

Accelerating the Journey to Series Production

Machine Shops in a Challenging World

Thailand Remains As Production Base For Toyota

 

WANT MORE INSIDER NEWS? SUBSCRIBE TO OUR DIGITAL MAGAZINE NOW!

FOLLOW US ON: LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter

 

 

Australian Army Pushes Metal 3D Printing To Extremes In Latest Field Trial

Australian Army Pushes Metal 3D Printing to Extremes in Latest Field Trial

Building on the success of its world-first field trial in June this year, a WarpSPEE3D 3D metal printer has again deployed and been put through its paces by the Australian Army during a two-week field exercise in the extreme heat and humidity of the Northern Territory.

WarpSPEE3D is the world’s first large-format metal 3D printer to use patented cold spray technology that enables significantly faster and more cost-effective metal part production than traditional manufacturing. Developed by SPEE3D, Australian award-winning manufacturer of metal additive manufacturing technology, the printer is capable of printing large metal parts up to 40kg at a record-breaking speed of 100grams per minute.

The printer arrived in Darwin in early June and forms the backbone of the Army’s developing 3D printing capability.

Having received a number of upgrades and modifications in the two months since its first deployment, the WarpSPEE3D print cell deployed, as part of 1 CSSB’s larger Brigade Support Group, to various field locations in temperatures up to 38 deg C and 80 percent humidity, whilst printing and machining genuine military metal parts.

SPEE3D printers make metal parts the fastest way possible, leveraging metal cold spray technology to produce industrial quality metal parts in just minutes, rather than days or weeks. This process harnesses the power of kinetic energy, rather than relying on high-power lasers and expensive gasses, allowing 3D metal printing in the field, at affordable costs.

The Australian Army announced a $1.5 million investment in a pilot of SPEE3D technology in February 2020 with a 12-month trial designed to test the feasibility of deploying 3D metal printers both on-base and in the field. SPEE3D partnered with the Advanced Manufacturing Alliance (AMA) and Charles Darwin University (CDU) to deliver the program with soldiers from the Australian Army’s 1st Brigade training in 3D printing at CDU since February.

The program aims to significantly increase unique parts available to the Army compared to what the regular supply chain can provide.

SPEE3D CEO Byron Kennedy said, “This second field deployment proves our technology is a genuine solution for expeditionary metal 3D printing. This two-week trial demonstrates the WarpSPEE3D is a robust workhorse that is capable of printing real parts and solving real problems in the field. It also proves that soldiers can take control of the whole workflow of creating the spare parts they need, from design to printing and post-processing, right here where they need them.”

For other exclusive articles, visit www.equipment-news.com.

 

Check these articles out:

Vietnam: A New Crossroad In Manufacturing Industry

CHIRON Launches First 3D Metal Printer

Flexible Sawing Solution for Additively Manufactured Parts

Rapid Additive Forging Technology For Titanium Parts

Metal 3D Printing Revolutionises Valve Design and Manufacturing

Global Metal 3D Printer Market Outlook

Market Outlook For Global 3D Laser Scanners

Mouldmakers Turn To Process Automation In Race To Recover

Accelerating the Journey to Series Production

 

WANT MORE INSIDER NEWS? SUBSCRIBE TO OUR DIGITAL MAGAZINE NOW!

FOLLOW US ON: LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter

 

 

Back To Top