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Siemens Connects Healthcare Providers And Medical Designers To Produce Components Through AM

Siemens Connects Healthcare Providers And Medical Designers To Produce Components Through AM

In response to the ongoing global health crisis caused by the outbreak of the COVID-19 virus, Siemens is making its Additive Manufacturing (AM) Network along with its 3D printers, available to the global medical community to speed design and production of medical components.

READ: HP Inc. And Partners Battles COVID19 With 3D Printing Solutions

The AM Network connects users, designers and 3D-print service providers to enable faster and less complicated production of spare parts for machines like ventilators. The Siemens AM network is available globally and covers the entire value chain – from upload and simulation to checking the design up to the printing process and associated services.

“Having worked on Additive Manufacturing for years, we offer AM solutions along the entire value chain and can print 3D parts quickly according to acute demands. To help fight COVID-19, we have opened our AM Network for hospitals and other health institutions needing spare medical parts to efficiently manage their design and printing requests”, said Klaus Helmrich, Member of the Managing Board of Siemens AG and CEO Siemens Digital Industries.

READ: Accelerate Smart Additive Manufacturing with Simulation

Siemens’ designers and engineers are a part of the AM Network so they can answer design requests and help convert designs into printable files. Afterwards, these components can be printed via medically certified 3D printers of partner companies that are also part of the AM Network.

In addition to numerous 3D printers from partner companies, Siemens’ 3D printing machines are also connected to the network and if suitable, will also be used to locally print components and spare parts for medical devices. Printing capacities from additional service providers can easily be added to the AM Network.

 

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ABI Research Names Siemens A Leader In Manufacturing Simulation Software

ABI Research Names Siemens A Leader In Manufacturing Simulation Software

Industry experts at ABI Research, a global tech market advisory firm, recently named Siemens a leader in manufacturing simulation software. Siemens offers solutions as part of Xcelerator, an integrated portfolio of software, services and application development platform, that can be used to simulate and model the behaviour of real-world production systems. Manufacturers are using Siemens’ software to create and leverage a comprehensive digital twin, enabling them to make confident design decisions and operational adjustments earlier in the process for smoother and more efficient production.

READ: Siemens On Data, Digitalisation, And Umati

“Siemens is a clear leader due to its market-leading capabilities that bring factory simulation, product digital twins, and virtual commissioning together, as well as their commercial strength in the smart manufacturing sphere and broad portfolio of interdependent technologies and software products,” said Ryan Martin, principal analyst at ABI Research. “Siemens’ presence across such a diverse range of software, technology, and hardware functions within the manufacturing value chain is a commercial asset it leverages to not only improve the efficacy of its simulation tools, but also their route to market.”

READ: Siemens Advances Digital Transformation With Its Advanced Manufacturing Transformation Centre In Singapore

There is increasing urgency for companies across industries to digitalise manufacturing to meet the demands of tomorrow, today. Companies who have already begun a digital transformation and embraced manufacturing simulation have been able to better realise desired production results. These companies can more rapidly execute on innovative ideas and explore disruptive manufacturing processes with confidence, knowing the decisions are based on proven simulation models and the comprehensive digital twin.

 

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Looking Ahead Into 2020

Looking Ahead Into 2020

Market outlook 2020: The year 2019 has been quite a challenging year for the manufacturing industry, with geopolitical tensions impacting investment decisions and shifts in manufacturing centres, and trends such as e-mobility, Industry 4.0, and additive manufacturing creating industrial transformation. In this Outlook 2020 special, six industry leaders share their thoughts on what to expect in 2020, how the industry will develop, new opportunities and market drivers, and how to navigate through the challenges and issues from these dynamics.

HEXAGON MANUFACTURING INTELLIGENCE

Lim Boon Choon, President, Asia Pacific, Hexagon Manufacturing Intelligence

The year 2019 was a time of economic uncertainty in global manufacturing. But the Asia Pacific region is well placed to capitalise on new opportunities in 2020, as increasing adoption of disruptive technologies shows organisations are facing market challenges by pursuing innovation-driven competitiveness. The growing recognition of the efficiency and operational excellence to be gained from digitised metrology offers long-term, sustainable investment and expansion in the Asia Pacific market.

The Growth of the Smart Factory

Increasingly connected enterprises will be a continuing trend throughout 2020 and beyond. The digital transformation of quality is a central part of this smart factory vision. Approaches to metrology data are maturing, and companies are focused on gaining actionable insights from real-time data. Growing demand for data analysis software is expected, and the adoption of platforms offering advanced big data and Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) capabilities will enable far more predictive and proactive manufacturing.

Across the region, new business models will emerge with the prevalence of cloud computing, connecting quality systems to machines throughout end-to-end processes and across factories. Streamlining the analysis and communication of metrology data is essential to breakdown operational silos and drive growth by enhancing product customisation capabilities and throughput.

The trend of automating metrology operations will continue to grow with the increasing adoption of robotics, measuring cells, and automated part loading, enabling manufacturers to scale up their autonomous capabilities. And as manufacturers look to increase their application flexibility, demand for non-contact 3D scanning technology will increase.

Driving Additive Manufacturing Capabilities

Additive manufacturing, also known as industrial 3D printing, is still emerging in sectors such as medical, transportation and logistics, construction, aviation, automotive, and shipping. But according to research from Thyssenkrupp, 3D printing is expected to create $100 billion in value in the ASEAN region by 2025. Quality will play a central role in expanding this developing process, with technologies such as 3D scanning and computed tomography (CT) for measuring internal geometries. Additive manufacturing is a key area of strategic importance for Hexagon. The recent acquisition of CT software provider Volume Graphics adds advanced measurement capabilities to Hexagon’s already comprehensive solution portfolio in the additive space, which also includes software for generative design and additive process simulation.

The expected widespread adoption of smart technologies suggests 2020 will mark a major step forward on the industry 4.0 journey.

 

ISCAR

Meir Noybauer, Business Development Manager, ISCAR

Throughout the year 2020, the industry as we know it will shift towards smart factories with IoT (Internet of Things) cyber connectivity, and AI (artificial intelligence) and robotics technologies, that will most likely be developed in the main industrial hubs as part of the fourth industrial revolution (Industry 4.0).

3D Printing

Additive Manufacturing and other advanced manufacturing technologies will continue to grow and replace conventional methods for machining automotive, aerospace and energy parts, and facilitate new opportunities for complicated part designs that were previously unrealizable.

Clean Energy

The global search for clean energy and low-emission mobility is leaning towards newer and harder materials, which challenge ISCAR to develop advanced machining technologies, such as SiAlON ceramics and super alloy materials, while using high and ultra-high coolant pressure to boost productivities to higher levels never seen before.

Medical

The medical sector will be one of the emerging industry segments, with sophisticated implants using advanced materials and machining technologies jointly developed by ISCAR engineers and leading medical implant companies throughout Europe, the US and Eastern Asia.

Automotive

The automotive segment will continue to be a global industry leader, while transitioning from conventional combustion to small hybrid-high efficiency engines and electric e-drive cars and implementing other clean mobile technologies, specifically for electric charging infrastructures which have not yet been applied in many countries.

 

MARPOSS

Stefano Corradini, Group Director, Sales & Marketing, Marposs

The year 2020 appears to be one of the most challenging years of the last decade, both in the Asia Pacific and worldwide.

The combination of trade wars and their impact on several geographic areas and market sectors, social turmoil in various countries, and many technological changes as consequence of increased environmental concerns, may have a significant negative effect on the general economic situation.

Automotive Manufacturing Evolution

Being a significant part of Marposs business somehow related to the automotive sector, we see the evolution from internal combustion engine (ICE) to electromobility as one of the biggest driver of the economic uncertainty. We prefer, anyway, to see this as an opportunity to offer our existing and new customers an extended panel of solutions, which are moving from our traditional measuring sector to a broader concept including several type of testing equipment (mainly leak test using different type of tracer gas extended also to fuel cells), as well as inspection applications (non-destructive, vision, and similar), and control systems to monitor the whole manufacturing process of the core components of the NEVs/BEVs (new/battery energy vehicles), such as battery cells, modules and packs, battery trays, and electric drive units (EDU) including electric motors; and end of line testing.

We are willing to become a preferred partner of BEV manufacturers and suppliers as we have been for decades for traditional combustion engines, offering them our technical know-how, our innovation culture, and our worldwide organization for sales and after sales.

 

RENISHAW

Steve Bell, General Manager, ASEAN, Renishaw (Singapore) Pte Ltd

Smart manufacturing technologies increase visibility and transparency to manufacturing operations, allowing manufacturers to get the overall picture of their productivity and competitiveness, to make faster changes in response to market-based threats or opportunities. This requires a range of intelligent process control solutions throughout the factory, to ensure high standards of repeatability. The key is going digital—connecting physical manufacturing processes with the digital technology to make decisions about process improvement on the shop floor, or on mobile devices.

Flexible and Customised

Additive manufacturing plays a major role in the Industry 4.0 revolution, allowing manufacturers the flexibility to build highly customised parts. Renishaw’s additive manufacturing technologies continue to evolve, aiming to provide users the flexibility to use, change and manage different metal materials, enables users to adapt to meet market demand and configure processes to achieve optimal performance.

Focus on Automotive Industry

Ensuring businesses are equipped and ready to navigate the evolving automotive manufacturing landscape, Renishaw’s manufacturing solutions provide the speed, flexibility, and ease of use to help companies adapt their production capabilities for the evolving electric future. From multi-sensor rapid scanning of machined castings to material analysis of fuel cells, we will continue to support customers on the road from internal combustion engine (ICE) to electric vehicles (EV).

 

SIEMENS DIGITAL INDUSTRIES SOFTWARE

Alex Teo, Managing Director, Southeast Asia, Siemens Digital Industries Software

The maturity of manufacturing supply chains in Asia has undoubtedly exerted pressure on the metalworking industry to be more competitive than ever. Demand for steel in Asia is expected to rise by an average of 1.5 percent in 2020, and will likely see effects such as rising operating costs necessitating the move for businesses to look for technology driven solutions to relieve some of these operational strains. In particular, Southeast Asia is an exciting region for growth, with markets such as Malaysia, Vietnam, and Singapore making strides in realising their Industry 4.0 visions through digitalisation. In 2020, we also launched a Technical Competency Hub in Penang, the first in the region, which serves as a platform for Siemens to help companies, especially SMEs, begin their digitalisation journey in order to meet the needs of the new economy.

Digital Twins

Using digital twins, manufacturers will be able to explore more economical and structurally enhanced materials. By leveraging physics-based simulations, supported by data analytics in an entirely virtual environment, the expansion of production capacity in Asia can be further encouraged. This means that manufacturers can optimise their choice of materials by testing and analysing combinations of different metals and alloys digitally before using additive manufacturing technologies such as powder bed fusion to produce these components faster and more reliably, reducing the need and cost for real prototypes.

Additive Manufacturing

Siemens’ end-to-end additive manufacturing solutions cover CAD/CAM/CAE models that enable product design and simulation of production processes and planning, preparation, and verification of the print jobs. Simulation and 3D modelling allow for advanced complexity of design and quality, ultimately resulting in fewer distortions and errors. The goal is flawless execution when parts come out of a factory, ready for certification. The full additive challenge covers the entire value chain: product design, production process, and performance.

Using customisable solutions for pressing, transporting, positioning and press safety, in combination with simulation for the entire spectrum of metal forming, businesses can proactively advance with components working seamlessly together. This collaboration increases the cost-effectiveness of all production processes in all sectors, reducing energy costs.

 

VDW (GERMAN MACHINE TOOL MANUFACTURERS’ ASSOCIATION)

Dr. Wilfried Schäfer, Executive Director, VDW (German Machine Tool Manufacturers’ Association)

The economic environment for the international and German machine tool industry remains difficult now and in the coming months. After eight years of high economic activity in the international machine tool industry, global demand for capital goods has calmed considerably after the fourth quarter of 2018. The reasons for this have already been identified and discussed many times. The economic distortions, in particular the trade war between the United States and China, are boosting the already sharp drop in demand. The increasing protectionism at all levels is affecting world trade and international supply chains. Finally, the structural shift in the automotive industry towards new drive technologies is causing further problems. It is still questionable at what pace and extent development is progressing and which technologies will be used in the future. The entire scenario is unsettling the industry worldwide. Companies have become very cautious, and they are shifting their investments.

Because of these, incoming orders in the international machine tool industry fell sharply in all regions in the first nine months of 2019. According to initial estimates, orders worldwide fell by 21 percent. Asia declined by 24 percent, while Europe lost 19 percent of its orders. Contracts in America, which is particularly the United States, held up best, if we can say so. They went down 18 percent in comparison to the previous year. In Germany, with its high dependence on exports, incoming orders fell by 23 percent by October in 2019, the most recent available data. This applies equally to domestic and foreign orders.

Markets to Stabilise

Oxford Economics, the VDW’s forecasting partner, expects this trend to stabilise in the best case scenario for 2020. At 2.5 percent, global economic output is expected to be slightly below the increase in 2019. With 2.1 percent, industrial production will grow more strongly than the current year. This also applies to investments. Stabilisation is also expected for the whole German economy. Industrial production, which is expected to shrink in 2019, is likely to turn slightly up again. This means that incoming orders in the machine tool industry will probably go through the bottom in the course of the coming year.

Machine tool consumption, a late indicator, will remain negative in all regions. Asia is the exception. Manufacturers can draw new hope from the fact that the election results in Great Britain have now provided certainty about the island’s exit date from the European Union. Then, the negotiations on a tariff agreement can begin and hopefully lead to a good end. There is also movement in the trade conflict between the United States and China. Should a consensus be reached, the world economy will reach new momentum as well.

 

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Siemens Addresses Overheating Challenges In Additive Manufacturing

Siemens Addresses Overheating Challenges in Additive Manufacturing

Siemens Digital Industries Software has released the Additive Manufacturing (AM) Path Optimizer, a beta technology integrated in NX software to help customers solve overheating challenges and help reduce scrap and increase production yield to achieve the industrialization of AM, or the use of AM at the industrial scale.

Siemens has developed this next generation advanced simulation technology to help maximize the production yield and quality of powder bed fusion manufactured parts. This latest extension of Siemens’ end-to-end additive manufacturing solution feeds the digital thread, informing each step of the industrialized additive manufacturing process.

Building on the Simcenter Additive Manufacturing Process Simulation solution announced in November 2018, AM Path Optimizer complements Siemens’ strategy for the digital twin of the manufacturing process and addresses errors originated from suboptimal scan strategies and process parameters. These can lead to systematic failures due to overheating, which can cause scrap and inconsistencies in component quality. The company has had success demonstrating this beta technology with TRUMPF as a partner.

“With the AM Path Optimizer, Siemens and TRUMPF can push industrialization of additive technologies further forward,” said Jeroen Risse, AM Expert at TRUMPF. “In our demonstrations, we saw an improvement of geometrical accuracy, elimination of re-coater errors caused by overheating, as well as a more homogenous surface quality. Also, the scrap rate is expected to be reduced significantly.”

The technology uses an innovative approach combining physics-based simulation with machine learning to analyse a full job file in few minutes before execution on the machine. This technology is expected to help achieve “first time right” prints and drastically reduce trial and error. It can also help reduce printing costs and enable the printing of components that are nearly impossible to achieve today.

“AM Path Optimizer is the latest innovation in Siemens’ end-to-end additive manufacturing solutions, and one that we feel will have a great impact on the use of additive manufacturing for powder bed fusion manufactured parts,” said Zvi Feuer, Senior Vice President, Manufacturing Engineering Software of Siemens Digital Industries Software. “The combination of NX for AM and our Simcenter AM technology within the Xcelerator portfolio provides our customers with key capabilities to assist manufacturers in designing and printing useful parts at scale, which is unmatched in the market.”

 

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Siemens Opens Additive Manufacturing Network

Siemens Opens Additive Manufacturing Network

Siemens has launched the Siemens Additive Manufacturing (AM) Network, following pilots and successful implementations with customers and partners, including Decathlon, Siemens Gas & Power, Siemens Mobility, HP and Materialise. The Siemens AM Network provides an advanced cloud-based solution to foster collaboration and process orchestration between engineers, procurement and suppliers of 3D printed parts. Providing an end-to-end digital process that connects the demand for parts with a supplier network helps enable globally distributed manufacturing. The Siemens Additive Manufacturing Network will be featured at Formnext 2019 in Frankfurt, Germany.

Siemens’ AM Network is designed for enterprises, suppliers and partners that are looking to accelerate the adoption of AM for industrial processes and applications. It digitalises the order-to-delivery process by aligning the engineering and commercial processes for high-quality AM functional prototypes and serial production parts. The system connects buyers with a global supplier network which streamlines the process, fosters collaboration and engagement, and orchestrates the workflow to increase throughput and reduce operational costs. As part of the Siemens’ suite of Software as a Service (SaaS) solutions, the AM Network meets the most stringent requirements for security, availability and regulatory compliance.

“Siemens’ additive manufacturing experts and industry veterans have developed the additive manufacturing network based on a clear understanding of the complexities and needs of the industry, fostered by a sincere passion to promote the adoption of AM in the industrial domain,” said Zvi Feuer, Senior Vice President Manufacturing Engineering at Siemens Digital Industries Software. “As buyers, sellers and partners continue to plug into the ecosystem, they will find a streamlined, modular solution that can grow with each company’s individual needs.”

Expanding Strategic Industrial Alliance

Earlier this year Siemens and HP continued to build on their long standing strategic alliance with the introduction of a joint additive manufacturing solution targeting the automotive industry and other key industrial markets. The partnership is expanding with the integration of HP’s advanced 3D printing technology with the Siemens AM Network, and with the addition of HP’s Digital Manufacturing Network partners to the Siemens AM Network. The HP Digital Manufacturing Network is a global community of digital manufacturing service providers with the capabilities to help design, produce, and deliver high quality plastic and metal final parts at scale leveraging HP‘s Multi Jet Fusion and Metal Jet 3D printing solutions.

“We believe that collaboration among AM industry leaders is key. It increases the adoption of 3D printing and it supports companies in their digital transformation,” said Ben Cassiman, Global Key Partner Manager at Materialise. “As a member of HPs Digital Manufacturing Network, and as a supplier joining the Siemens AM Network Supplier’s community, we’re expanding our successful partnerships with Siemens and HP, advancing AM series production and mass customisation.”

 

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Siemens Expands Additive Manufacturing Portfolio Through Acquisition Of Atlas

Siemens Expands Additive Manufacturing Portfolio Through Acquisition Of Atlas

Siemens has signed an agreement to acquire Atlas 3D Incorporated, a Plymouth, Indiana-based developer of software that works with direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) printers to automatically provide design engineers with the optimal print orientation and requisite support structures for additive parts in near real-time. Atlas 3D will join Siemens Digital Industries Software, where its solutions will expand additive manufacturing capabilities in the Xcelerator portfolio of software.

Sunata software uses thermal distortion analysis to provide a simple, automated way to optimize part build orientation and generate support structures. This approach allows the designer—rather than the analyst—to perform these simulations, thereby reducing the downstream analysis that needs to be conducted via Simcenter software to achieve a part that meets design requirements. Siemens plans to make the Atlas 3D solution available through its online Additive Manufacturing Network.

“We welcome Atlas 3D to the Siemens community as the newest member of our additive manufacturing team. Our solutions industrialize additive manufacturing for large enterprises, 3D printing service bureaus, design firms and CAD designers,” said Zvi Feuer, Senior Vice President, Manufacturing Engineering Software of Siemens Digital Industries Software. “The cloud-based Sunata software makes it easy for designers to determine the optimal way to 3D print parts for high quality and repeatability. The combination of Sunata with the robust CAE additive manufacturing tools in Simcenter enables a ‘right first time’ approach for industrial 3D printing.”

The high rate of 3D print failures is a key challenge companies face in leveraging additive manufacturing for high-volume production. Parts often need to go through several design and analysis iterations before the optimal build orientation and support structures are determined. Typically, designers don’t have the capabilities to consider such factors as part orientation, distortion, and heat extraction uniformity in their design. This puts the onus on engineering specialists to resolve such issues.

Atlas 3D’s Sunata software solves this problem by giving front-end designers a quick, easy and automated way to get much closer to a “right first time” build. Sunata is a GPU-accelerated high-performance computing additive manufacturing software solution that can deliver results up to one hundred times faster than other build simulation solutions on the market. GPU-accelerated computing is the employment of a graphics processing unit (GPU) along with a computer processing unit (CPU) to facilitate processing-intensive operations such as deep learning, analytics and engineering applications.

 

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Siemens On Data, Digitalisation, And Umati

Siemens On Data, Digitalisation, And Umati

In an interview with Asia Pacific Metalworking Equipment News, Uwe-Armin Ruttkamp of Siemens Digital Industries talked about how digitalisation is helping machine builders and users, the utilisation of data to improve manufacturing processes, as well as how umati will help push the metalworking industry forward. Article by Stephen Las Marias.

Uwe-Armin Ruttkamp

One of the highlights of Siemens’ booth at EMO Hannover 2019 is the latest generation of its Sinumerik One, the first digital native CNC aimed at driving the digital transformation in the machine tool industry. Siemens has also extended its Industrial Edge offerings for Sinumerik Edge to include more new applications to help machine tool users improve workpiece and process quality, increase machine availability, and further optimise machine processes.

With Sinumerik One, machine tool manufacturers can virtually map their entire development processes, significantly reducing the product development phase and time to market for new machines. This helps machine builders significantly reduce the duration of actual commissioning. Its virtual model opens up new possibilities for manufacturers and operators—machine concepts and functions can be discussed even before real hardware is available.

Sinumerik One enables machine users the programming of workpieces in the virtual environment and the setup and operation of machines completely on the PC. Employee training can also be carried out using the digital twin instead of the actual machine. These hardware and software innovations help machine builders and operators speed up processing steps significantly.

In an interview with Asia Pacific Metalworking Equipment News, Uwe-Armin Ruttkamp, Head of Machine Tool Systems, Motion Control Business Unit, Siemens Digital Industries, talked more about the benefits of these new technologies and how digitalisation is helping machine builders and users. He also discussed the utilisation of data to improve manufacturing processes, as well as how umati will help push the metalworking industry forward.

When we look at the current potential for these technologies and all that they involve, are they more suited to advanced markets such as Europe or the US?

Uwe-Armin Ruttkamp (UR): I wouldn’t say so. You have all kinds of industries also in Asian countries. Not everything is low-cost and price-driven; they are also technology driven, especially aerospace, automotive industries, or the upcoming additive manufacturing.

So, there’s a lot of technologies driving the industries. In addition to this, labour is not staying on this low-cost level—in Asian countries, people want to earn more money as well—so saving time, and saving cost by saving time, is also an issue for Asian countries.

How does this technology play out in the smart factory concept?

UR: It plays perfectly into that concept, because with our Digital Enterprise (DE) Portfolio we offer a holistic end-to-end solution including industrial software and automation that allows the use of a seamless value chain. This value chain consists of five steps for the machine user, and five steps for the machine builder. If you build a machine, you start with a concept, mechanics, you go to electrical design, you go to engineering, you go to commissioning, and sometimes, it also needs service.

For the machine user, there are also several steps needed to build a part. Get the machine on the shop floor, create a part, build the part, check it for quality, and ship it. And this complete concept is the basis for running a smart factory.

In a lot of these steps, Sinumerik One brings great benefits. For example, in machine engineering, people in the offices can engineer the machine. You don’t need to have a test rack next to your desk, and you don’t need to go to the shop floor to test the applications. You can do it all in the virtual world. That’s one perfect example of an Industry 4.0 application that people will get from our Sinumerik One concept.

How do you see digital twins being implemented by customers in Asia?

UR: I see a lot of customers thinking about it. We talk to many customers, including those in Asia. We, for example, are customers of our customers. We have factories ourselves. And we only buy machines where we can get a digital twin beforehand. We make it a prerequisite for purchasing a machine, that it comes with a digital twin. And I believe in future many other users are going to do the same. The benefits are huge. You can train the people, who are going to operate the machine, before the machine is even delivered. And even more, you can also do the run-ins, do the first test of the programs, and know the cycle time of the production, before the machine is delivered.

Does siemens have a benchmark so that when machine users’ data are analysed, they will determine whether they are doing okay or they are falling short?

UR: We offer from our service department a digitalisation check. Together with our customers we examine their factories and give them advise what digitalisation measures are in place to get to another productivity level. It’s a consulting approach not a benchmark.

More and more people are talking about the lights out factory. how are you helping customers go into that level of manufacturing?

UR: Lights out factories are not new. When you go into an automotive factory, for example they produce the same part over and over, it is relatively an automated production. So, what they have done, of course, is to use a CAD/CAM chain, which, out from the design of the piece, create the program to build the piece, download it into the machine, and run it. Of course, this is something we support with our DE portfolio. You can put a program into the machine remotely, and then run it automatically. But of course, it requires in-feed of the materials and taking out the material and the pieces produced. But then again, you need automation, and the complete tool chain and software, like NX for example, or TeamCenter, to have a data backbone for all the production information about the part. But there are other companies focusing on job shops, so they produce many different parts every day according to customer specifications. For them it does not make sense run a fully automated line. So, a lights-out factory for them is not possible.

UMATI - Universal Machine Tool InterfaceOne of the highlights of emo 2019 is umati. How are you supporting this initiative?

UR: We support it 100 percent. We are part of the initiative and helped it to get to the point where we are today. At Siemens our solution to serve a universal interface for machine tools is based on our industrial edge concept. Edge computing is the perfect solution for this. For example, one wants to have a central dashboard, which shows the amount of cooling liquid used per hour. Cooling liquid per hour is not stored as one piece of information in all the machines in the same way. You need to have some sort of programming that knows where that data is stored in the machine and sends it out in a uniform way. Our Siemens industrial edge concept is perfectly suited for this, because OPC-UA is built into our edge devices. This allows the machines to communicate the data provided based on OPC-UA, and the user can program a little piece of code into it to acquire the data out of the machine.

The specifications for umati is still being finalised. during its early development, what were the challenges that you experienced, and are they still a challenge now?

UR: From a technical perspective, it’s not difficult, because it is OPC-UA, and it is a definition of data. It is basically a companion stem based on OPC-UA. The difficult part was to get an agreement among all parties which data they want to support, or which use cases they want to support. Once umati defines which piece of information has to be programmed, it’s done. It’s relatively simple.

 

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Bosch Rexroth, Siemens Joins Sodick, PBA Group In JID’s Advanced Manufacturing Ecosystem

Bosch Rexroth, Siemens Joins Sodick, PBA Group in JID’s Advanced Manufacturing Ecosystem

​Jurong Innovation District (JID) is fast gaining traction as a one-stop advanced manufacturing campus clustering researchers, technology and training providers, and factories of the future. Industry 4.0 champions such as Agency for Science, Technology and Research’s (A*STAR) Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology and National Metrology Centre, Bosch Rexroth, ISDN, Flowserve and Siemens are setting up their facilities in JID, joining A*STAR’s Advanced Remanufacturing and Technology Centre (ARTC), McKinsey Digital Capability Centre, PBA Group, Sodick Singapore Techno Centre and Shimano as part of JID’s Advanced Manufacturing ecosystem.

Masterplanned to house the full manufacturing value chain, advanced manufacturers in JID can leverage on the growing ecosystem of R&D, training and capability development, and technology expertise to collaborate and grow together. For example, Siemens will set up their first-of-its-kind Advance Manufacturing Transformation Centre (AMTC) to support the digitalisation and transformation of manufacturing facilities in ASEAN. The AMTC will showcase state-of-the-art Siemens digital enterprise solutions, such as tools to create digital twin facility models to simulate and evaluate its operations in a real manufacturing environment. AMTC will also house Siemens’ first Additive Manufacturing Experience Centre (AMEC) outside Germany, where companies can experience an end-to-end additive manufacturing production line with Siemens’ technology partners.

“The advanced manufacturing ecosystem in JID is shaping up very well. We are happy to see a campus with a growing ecosystem of researchers, technology and training providers to support the adoption of advanced manufacturing solutions in Singapore. The campus will not only benefit Singapore’s industries, but has the potential to serve the region at a time when technology is transforming the manufacturing sector. We hope the JID community can grow collectively to become leaders in advanced manufacturing,” said Ng Lang, CEO of JTC.

Raimund Klein, Head of Siemens Digital Industries ASEAN, said, “JID presents itself as an attractive location for the setup of Siemens’ first Additive Manufacturing Experience Centre (AMEC) outside of Germany. The anchoring of players in a common space will allow us to better support manufacturing facilities on their journey of adoption, transition and transformation towards advanced manufacturing.”

Bosch Rexroth Regional Training centre in JID will administer a standardised training programme following the AHK (German Chamber of Industry and Commerce) framework, to expose manufacturers with the application of Industry 4.0 technologies and practices. Bosch Rexroth will also collaborate with companies to testbed Industry 4.0 projects at the Centre to support implementation of solutions and develop companies’ expertise in the process.

A key feature of JID that resonates well with global manufacturers is its strong sustainability theme in its development blueprint. Set in a natural environment, the district targets 40% green coverage with parks, lush greenery and biodiversity for the community, while an 11km car-free sky corridor with dedicated lanes for pedestrians, cyclists and autonomous shuttles aims to support a car-lite environment. Its underground logistics network—the first in Singapore—will reduce traffic congestion by moving heavy vehicles underground. The district cooling system and estate operations centre will monitor and minimise energy consumption across the entire District.

The 600-hectare industrial district strategically located along Singapore’s western manufacturing belt is expected to create over 95,000 new jobs.

 

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Siemens ASEAN Appoints Thai Lai Pham As New CEO

Siemens ASEAN Appoints Thai Lai Pham as New CEO

Dr. Thai Lai Pham

Dr. Thai Lai Pham

Siemens has appointed Dr. Thai Lai Pham as the new CEO of Siemens ASEAN and Singapore, effective November 1, 2019. Dr. Pham will concurrently be the Country CEO of Siemens Vietnam, a position he has held since 2012. He succeeds Dr. Armin Bruck, who will retire from Siemens after an illustrious 32-year career with the company.

Dr. Pham started his career in Siemens in 1997 in the company’s Corporate Research unit in Princeton, USA. He then took on various corporate strategy, product development, sales and management roles in the now-defunct mobile phones division, as well as the Healthcare, Energy and Building Technologies divisions, in the US, Europe and Asia.

As Country CEO of Siemens Vietnam, Dr Pham has grown the business and led Siemens to become a key infrastructure partner for the country. Siemens has most recently helped VinFast, Vietnam’s first volume car manufacturer, to build Southeast Asia’s first fully digital factory; and equipped Trung Nam Solar Park, Vietnam’s largest solar farm, with an electrical Balance of Plant solution.

In his new role as CEO of Siemens ASEAN, Dr. Pham will help to sharpen the company’s industrial core of Digital Industries, Smart Infrastructure and Mobility businesses in the region.

 

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Siemens Advances Digital Transformation With Its Advanced Manufacturing Transformation Centre In Singapore

Siemens Advances Digital Transformation With Its Advanced Manufacturing Transformation Centre In Singapore

Siemens will be setting up an Advanced Manufacturing Transformation Centre (AMTC) in the Jurong Innovation District (JID) alongside Bosch Rexroth, ISDN, A*STAR Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology and the National Metrology Centre. The AMTC will provide guidance and support to manufacturing facilities in ASEAN on their journey of adoption, transition and transformation towards advanced manufacturing. Showcasing Siemens digital enterprise solutions, it enables companies to create a digital twin model in order to simulate and evaluate its operations in a real manufacturing environment.

Furthermore, the AMTC will house its first Additive Manufacturing Experience Center (AMEC) outside of Germany, where companies can experience an advance end-to-end additive manufacturing production line with their technology partners. Companies will be able to carry out prototyping and low volume production with the support of our on-site Additive Manufacturing experts, enabling a smooth transition and transformation to in-house advance manufacturing.

Not only is the AMTC a facility for research and development activities for additive manufacturing, it will also be an advance manufacturing ecosystem with operational production capabilities.

For more information, click here.

 

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