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Walter Tool Life App

Walter Tool Life App

Walter’s Tool Life app is for visualising and analysing tool data. The browser-based user interface can be called up universally via the intranet network of the relevant customer. The user interface has improved menu navigation handling, while a newly structured database in the background enhances performance. The app does not need a code to identify the tools for the system. This means that users benefit from multi-device functionality and flexible working.

Users will need the company’s appCom package—comprising an industrial PC and standard software developed—to make full use of the app.

 

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Manufacturing Turbochargers: Turbine Housings Made Affordable

Manufacturing Turbochargers: Turbine Housings Made Affordable

Roughing and finishing turbine housings is particularly challenging in the case of passenger cars with spark-ignition engines. By Lim Gan Shu, marketing manager, Walter AG Singapore.

Downsizing makes engines more economical. In order to ensure that their performance is not compromised, turbochargers are increasingly being used to compensate in smaller vehicles. The market is growing – but so is the pressure on prices.

Vehicle fuel consumption needs to be reduced – not just in the lab. Legal provisions from all over the world are driving the automotive industry to implement measures in almost every vehicle class. This has given rise to huge challenges for the automotive industry. An important factor: Turbochargers that squeeze high performance out of small yet efficient engines. However, the turbochargers themselves are also under pressure to be smaller, more efficient and, importantly, more cost-efficient.

Reducing Machining Costs

“We expect—and studies by leading turbocharger manufacturers agree—that the number of turbochargers used for petrol engines will experience a 2.5-fold increase over the next five years,” says Rolf Buob, component manager for turbine housings at Walter AG in Tübingen.

Currently, turbochargers for petrol engines place particularly high demands on machining when compared with diesel engines. The exhaust gases in the turbine housing reach temperatures of between 1,000 and 1,050 °C; in diesel engines, however, they reach relatively low temperatures of between 800 and 850 °C.

“Temperatures of 1,000 °C or higher require high temperature-resistant steels, typically chrome-nickel alloy steels that have a material identification number beginning with 1.48 and ending in 49, 48, 37 or 26 – with a tendency towards the material identification number 1.4826. These 1.48 steels are constantly being developed further and it is becoming more and more difficult to machine them,” explained Mr Buob.

They also make the turbine housing the most expensive component in terms of machining. Mr Buob explained further: “We anticipate different machining costs for each component, depending on the presence of an exhaust manifold.” Above all else, a high chrome content reduces service life. “There are applications where tools only last long enough for twenty to thirty components.” For comparison: The materials used for diesel engine turbine housings extend the service life by up to five or ten times, while also being 50 percent faster to machine.

Walter machining experts have therefore developed a new milling cutter concept especially for roughing, semi-finishing and finishing turbocharger housings. It reduces the all-important cost per finished part, while also significantly improving surface quality. Over the course of the development process, the cartridge system used for finishing, which had previously been the norm, was replaced with an intentionally simple tool design with a fixed insert seat.

This “plug-and-play” solution eliminates the need to carry out presetting operations, which required accuracy to between 3 and 5 µm.

Reducing Pressure

Further saving measures: The use of identical indexable inserts with 16 cutting edges as semi-finishing and finishing inserts. Previously, the market standard was to use 12 for semi-finishing and four for finishing. This also simplifies inventories and eliminates errors when changing the indexable inserts. The indexable inserts are coated with PVD or CVD and are available in various geometries.

Indexable inserts belonging to the Walter WSP45S or WSM45X grades are typically used. Short cutting edges reduce the pressure on the unstable components. This results in reduced vibration, which improves surface quality, increasing it from the usual Rz 7-8 to approximately Rz 5. “Overall, these measures lead to improvements in handling and process reliability,” said Mr Buob.

As a rule, every third to fifth insert is positioned differently on the finishing tool. The position of the semi-finishing inserts can be adjusted by approximately 5° in the same way as when carrying out rough machining; the finishing inserts are inserted so as to cut in a flat plane.

Mr Buob explained: “This is why we distinguish between semi-finishing and finishing inserts on the same tool, even when the inserts are identical. Only the insert seats are rotated differently when inserted.”

The cutting speed when finishing is approximately 140 m per min at a feed rate per revolution of up to 4 mm. This milling cutter is also available for machining allowances of up to 3 mm for roughing in particular. Here, the indexable inserts are aligned uniformly both axially and radially, in contrast to the finishing face mill. They all have the same function for machining operations.

However, the new milling cutter concept does not mean that development has finished. Walter is expected to make further advances involving new PVD coatings that are currently still in development.

Manufacturing Turbochargers: Turbine Housings Made Affordable

Walter has developed a new milling cutter system to meet the specific requirements of thin-walled  turbine housings.

Walter: Carbide Drilling Tools

Walter: Carbide Drilling Tools

Walter has developed the DC170 and is offering the first two models in dimensions 16xDc and 20xDc. The drill offers more process reliability, stability, running smoothness and efficiency than carbide drills with traditional geometries.

The drills are internally cooled. As a result, the coolant flows unimpeded, while hazardous chip jams are at the same time avoided. The manufacturer also says that the solid carbide mass directly behind the cutting edge makes the drill sturdy.

Finally, drills straight from the factory are supplied with eight visible channels that can be used as a scale for regrinding. The drills can be reconditioned up to three times, until only two cooling channels are left remaining.

Ramping It Up

Ramping It Up

Aluminium is one of the most important materials in the aerospace industry. Furthermore, typical components are extremely machining-intensive and therefore require long production times. Tools designed to precisely suit these requirements, such as the M2131 ramping cutter from Walter AG, help to reduce machining times and costs. Lim Ganshu, Walter marketing, explains

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Upping The Precision

Upping The Precision

Producing components for modern gas turbines is a challenge that machining experts are familiar with; they are often faced with the task of machining difficult-to-cut materials such as titanium alloys and superalloys and creating shapes such as onion-shaped profiles and flutes. This difficulty is compounded by the fact that the turnaround time for machining the components must be as short as possible, while the process must be incredibly precise. Lim Gan Shu, marketing manager, Walter AG shows how precision tools, developed machining concepts and optimised tools set new standards in the field.

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Walter: Porcupine Milling Cutters

Walter: Porcupine Milling Cutters

The new M4256, M4257 and M4258 porcupine milling cutters are versatile in terms of both the range of applications and the materials for which they can be used, which include steel, cast iron, stainless steels, and difficult-to-cut materials.

They are available with Weldon shank, modular ScrewFit interface and bore adaption. Their compact length and half-effective design with low cutting pressure allow for a smooth operation, reducing the tendency to oscillate and vibrate to make them suitable even in unstable conditions.

The features of these milling cutters become more prominent when paired with the D51 geometry insert. The chip clearance integral in these porcupine milling cutters make for an effective chip evacuation, especially in flute design where chips cannot fly to the side.

The milling cutters can also be used for ramping, pocket milling, shoulder milling and circular interpolation. They are most likely to be of interest to users operating in the general mechanical engineering sector.

APMEN Products

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Digitalisation In Practice

Digitalisation In Practice

Digital platforms are being developed on the basis of which users can apply their tools more efficiently, cut back on waste, and minimise tasks that were previously carried out manually. By Walter 

The digitalisation of the manufacturing industry is beginning to take shape. The main objective has already been defined: The continuous digitalisation and networking of all production processes, or “digital manufacturing” for short. In recent months, experts at Walter have come significantly closer to achieving this objective.

Potential for Optimisation

“Of course, digital manufacturing is not an end in itself,” explained Holger Langhans, director of Walter Multiply. “In the discussions that we held with our customers, it always came down to the question of how digitalisation can help them to optimise manufacturing processes (and the processes associated with those), increase productivity and reduce costs.”

Since then, Mr Langhans and his team have implemented some of these opportunities in the form of software modules or applications.

To thoroughly test them and develop them further to ensure they are fit for everyday use, Walter set up two test segments: In Walter’s manufacturing environment, practical tests are running on ten machines, while a further five machines in the Technology Centre have been equipped with the new digital applications.

Sorting It Out

Florian Böpple, expert in digital manufacturing at Walter: “As things stand today, we have more than a dozen apps undergoing continuous testing. Previous results have shown that we are on the right path here: In a very practical way, they are helping to detect and unlock the potential for optimisation in the process chain, to make the processes significantly more transparent, and to visualise the potential.”

The solutions involved here address topics that, in practice, affect the everyday work of every manufacturing operation: “We are working on reducing waste when it comes to materials and tools. We are optimising interfaces in the process chain, minimising the manual tasks, and improving the interaction between machines — the machine-to-machine connection.”

Optimising Loading

One of these applications, which is already running, is used to optimise loading. The principle is simple: The user first selects the program that they want to run next on the machine. The “Loading Optimisation” app automatically compares the tools that are called up in the manufacturing program with those that are already available on the machine.

The benefits are obvious: The user can see, at a glance, which tools they should set up and which they shouldn’t; this reduces their average manual effort. And, if there is sufficient space on the machine, they can set up all of the tools that are required for the planned orders.

Reducing Costs

The “Tool Cost Drivers” app should interest production managers and controllers in particular. They are informed, at a glance, about what tools create which tool costs. This is made possible by the link between real tool usage data from the machine and the purchase prices for the tools.

The data can then be used to determine which tool has created the highest costs based on its actual usage, and therefore should be top of the priority list when it comes to optimisation. “So, in a very simple way, we are helping to ensure that the average costs per tool are kept transparent,” Mr Böpple said.

Another app called the “Batch-By-Batch Optimisation” has also been in use at Walter for some time now. It analyses the tool that is currently being used and defines any potential for optimisation by using a sophisticated algorithm.

As a result, the application displays a table with the areas that have potential for optimisation, which are possible depending on the batch and the tool. In addition, the entire potential for savings is displayed as a percentage. This information means that users are well-placed to specifically intervene and to unlock the potential for optimisation.

Many Fields Of Application

More than a dozen of these apps have been developed and used by Walter’s experts since the start of the project (at least a year ago). They are all currently being used in the pilot phase in Walter’s manufacturing.

“Our objective is to establish an application platform that covers the most important topics in the manufacturing environment,” added Mr Langhans. “We are already well on our way to achieving this objective”.

The software modules are so basic in their design that their universal benefits can be delivered to many sectors – far beyond metal cutting. According to Mr Langhans, “Manufacturing companies often have similar areas where “the screws can be tightened”, which they can use to optimise their processes and structures. Our project is therefore generating a lot of interest from many business partners.”

In the near future, several pilot customers will begin using the applications and testing them in practice. Their experiences should help the experts at Walter to further develop the software modules based on the customer-specific requirements. And, in the end, this should deliver the required results under as wide a range of conditions as possible.

Open, Modular Approach

The application platform follows an open and modular approach and, as a result, can be flexibly adapted to meet forthcoming requirements. In future, users themselves should be able to add their own applications to the platform. Not insignificant: The data that is collected and generated from this sits on the customer’s servers and not in the cloud. “The company stays in control and decides for themselves who receives what data,” added Mr Böpple.

“Generally speaking, we give our customers an extremely powerful instrument — one which is extremely easy to install and which is simple to operate via the web-based interface.” All applications are based on real-time data, which means that the source of errors, along with optimisation potential, can be very quickly identified. “Our knowledge has been incomparable when it comes to other solutions on the market.”

Walter’s new technology centre in Tübingen, Germany is where the application platform is being operated continuously, thoroughly tested and subsequently enhanced. Customers can also try out all of the applications and the platform for themselves.

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Walter: M4000 Milling System

Walter: M4000 Milling System

Walter’s M4000 milling system has expanded to include the machining of non-ferrous metals such as aluminium.

It is available in three insert sizes—SD06, SD09 and SD12—and offers flexibility in terms of feed rates, depth of cut and speeds. With the new G88 geometry variant, the inserts can be used in different cutter types, which make handling easier, and reduces procurement and storage costs.

The Walter M4000 flank faces on system’s four cutting edges are provided with a wave profile, which displays the geometry of the indexable insert. The system indexable inserts have a positive basic shape with a clearance angle of 15 degrees, which results in less power required for Slot Drilling, Chamfer milling, High-Speed Milling Cutter & Shoulder mill.

THE SYSTEM INSERTS:
–Square indexable inserts: in face, shoulder, slot drill, chamfer and T-slot milling cutters
• 4 cutting edges
• Circumference-sintered design for maximum cost-efficiency
• Circumference-ground with facets (90°) for excellent component surface finishes
–Rhombic indexable inserts: Can be used in slot drill milling cutters
• 2 cutting edges
• Circumference-sintered design for maximum cost-efficiency
–Easy geometry selection thanks to specific “wave” on the flank face
–15° clearance angle
–Ground base: Improves the seating of the inserts in the mill body & reduces vibration

BENEFITS FOR YOU:

High level of cost-efficiency
–Reduced procurement and inventory costs thanks to the universal use of system insert
–4 cutting edges per indexable insert
Concept requiring minimum resources
-CO2-compensated production thanks to climate protection projects
–Low power requirement thanks to highly positive geometries

Powered by Tiger·tec® Silver
–2 CVD-coated grades
–3 PVD-coated grades

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Walter Digitalisation In Practice

Walter Digitalisation In Practice

Digital platforms are being developed on the basis of which users can apply their tools more efficiently, cut back on waste, and minimise tasks that were previously carried out manually. By Walter 

The digitalisation of the manufacturing industry is beginning to take shape. The main objective has already been defined: The continuous digitalisation and networking of all production processes, or “digital manufacturing” for short. In recent months, experts at Walter have come significantly closer to achieving this objective.

Potential for Optimisation

“Of course, digital manufacturing is not an end in itself,” explained Holger Langhans, director of Walter Multiply. “In the discussions that we held with our customers, it always came down to the question of how digitalisation can help them to optimise manufacturing processes (and the processes associated with those), increase productivity and reduce costs.”

Since then, Mr Langhans and his team have implemented some of these opportunities in the form of software modules or applications.

To thoroughly test them and develop them further to ensure they are fit for everyday use, Walter set up two test segments: In Walter’s manufacturing environment, practical tests are running on ten machines, while a further five machines in the Technology Centre have been equipped with the new digital applications.

Sorting It Out

Florian Böpple, an expert in digital manufacturing at Walter: “As things stand today, we have more than a dozen apps undergoing continuous testing. Previous results have shown that we are on the right path here: In a very practical way, they are helping to detect and unlock the potential for optimisation in the process chain, to make the processes significantly more transparent, and to visualise the potential.”

The solutions involved here address topics that, in practice, affect the everyday work of every manufacturing operation: “We are working on reducing waste when it comes to materials and tools. We are optimising interfaces in the process chain, minimising the manual tasks, and improving the interaction between machines — the machine-to-machine connection.”

Optimising Loading

One of these applications, which is already running, is used to optimise loading. The principle is simple: The user first selects the program that they want to run next on the machine. The “Loading Optimisation” app automatically compares the tools that are called up in the manufacturing program with those that are already available on the machine.

The benefits are obvious: The user can see, at a glance, which tools they should set up and which they shouldn’t; this reduces their average manual effort. And, if there is sufficient space on the machine, they can set up all of the tools that are required for the planned orders.

Reducing Costs

The “Tool Cost Drivers” app should interest production managers and controllers in particular. They are informed, at a glance, about what tools create which tool costs. This is made possible by the link between real tool usage data from the machine and the purchase prices for the tools.

The data can then be used to determine which tool has created the highest costs based on its actual usage, and therefore should be top of the priority list when it comes to optimisation. “So, in a very simple way, we are helping to ensure that the average costs per tool are kept transparent,” Mr Böpple said.

Another app called the “Batch-By-Batch Optimisation” has also been in use at Walter for some time now. It analyses the tool that is currently being used and defines any potential for optimisation by using a sophisticated algorithm.

As a result, the application displays a table with the areas that have the potential for optimisation, which is possible depending on the batch and the tool. In addition, the entire potential for savings is displayed as a percentage. This information means that users are well-placed to specifically intervene and to unlock the potential for optimisation.

Many Fields Of Application

More than a dozen of these apps have been developed and used by Walter’s experts since the start of the project (at least a year ago). They are all currently being used in the pilot phase in Walter’s manufacturing.

“Our objective is to establish an application platform that covers the most important topics in the manufacturing environment,” added Mr Langhans. “We are already well on our way to achieving this objective”.

The software modules are so basic in their design that their universal benefits can be delivered to many sectors – far beyond metal cutting. According to Mr Langhans, “Manufacturing companies often have similar areas where “the screws can be tightened”, which they can use to optimise their processes and structures. Our project is, therefore, generating a lot of interest from many business partners.”

In the near future, several pilot customers will begin using the applications and testing them in practice. Their experiences should help the experts at Walter to further develop the software modules based on the customer-specific requirements. And, in the end, this should deliver the required results under as wide a range of conditions as possible.

Open, Modular Approach

The application platform follows an open and modular approach and, as a result, can be flexibly adapted to meet forthcoming requirements. In future, users themselves should be able to add their own applications to the platform. Not insignificant: The data that is collected and generated from this sits on the customer’s servers and not in the cloud. “The company stays in control and decides for themselves who receives what data,” added Mr Böpple.

“Generally speaking, we give our customers an extremely powerful instrument — one which is extremely easy to install and which is simple to operate via the web-based interface.” All applications are based on real-time data, which means that the source of errors, along with optimisation potential, can be very quickly identified. “Our knowledge has been incomparable when it comes to other solutions on the market.”

Walter’s new technology centre in Tübingen, Germany is where the application platform is being operated continuously, thoroughly tested and subsequently enhanced. Customers can also try out all of the applications and the platform for themselves.

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