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Welding Materials Market To Reach USD$17.3 Billion By 2025

Welding Materials Market To Reach USD$17.3 Billion by 2025

As reported by MarketsandMarkets, the Welding Materials Market will grow from USD$13.6 billion in 2020 to USD$17.3 billion by 2025, at a CAGR of 4.8 percent during the forecast period.

The increased spending on the building & construction market, development of manufacturing sectors, and growing repair & maintenance activities are likely to drive the welding materials market.

APAC is the fastest-growing market for welding materials due to growing demand in JapanChina, and India. Increasing residential building constructions, as well as remodelling/reconstruction of existing infrastructures, are also expected to drive the market in the region.

APAC has also experienced significant growth in the last decade and accounted for approximately 34% of the global GDP in 2019. According to the Population Reference Bureau, ChinaIndia, and other emerging APAC countries had a combined population exceeding 4 billion in 2019. This is projected to become an increasingly important driver for global consumption over the next two decades.

The major advantage of arc welding is the concentration of heat applied to a large surface that enables better welding by providing a depth of penetration, which ultimately saves time. Arc welding is the most preferred technology due to its low cost and can be applied to a wide range of metal surfaces, making it highly sought after.

Key players operating in the welding materials market are Colfax Corporation (US), Air Liquide S.A. (France), Air Products & Chemicals (US), Illinois Tool Works (US), Linde PLC (UK), Lincoln Electric Holdings (US), Tianjin Bridge Welding Materials Group (China), and Kobe Steel (Japan).

These are the players that have adopted various growth strategies to expand their global presence and increase their market share.

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PTG Opens £1.6 Million Friction Stir Welding Research Centre

Frost & Sullivan: Welding Vendors Focusing On New Technologies And Energy Efficiency

Frost & Sullivan: Welding Vendors Focusing On New Technologies And Energy Efficiency

Frost & Sullivan’s recent analysis, Newer Welding Techniques to Enable Growth in the Digital Age, reports that increasing competition in the global welding equipment and consumables market has led manufacturers to focus on energy efficiency, operational excellence and reducing maintenance costs. Amid the uncertain economic conditions caused by COVID-19, the industry is forecast to reach $21.74 billion by 2024, growing at a CAGR of 1.3 percent. Growth is driven by opportunities from developing regions where infrastructure building, the introduction of new welding technologies, and automation are top priorities.

“Several new developments in welding technologies and materials are emerging due to an increased focus on energy efficiency from vendors and end-users. Advancements such as the ability to monitor and regulate the weld temperature while in the process are generating highly efficient outputs and better quality. These innovations will reduce operational tasks, improve energy management and extend electrode life,” said Krishnan Ramanathan, Industry Manager, Industrial Technologies Practice, Frost & Sullivan.

Digital transformation is gaining traction in Australia and Singapore as their communications infrastructure is upgraded. This digitalisation is expected to propel the welding market as other countries modernise. China, India, and Brazil are also vital for welding equipment and consumables suppliers as they have high energy and infrastructure requirements. However, the development rate is likely to be gradual as economies recover from the impact of COVID-19.

“IIoT is a major trend affecting equipment manufacturers as end-users continue to emphasise on improving their plant maintenance and curb operational expenditure (OPEX),” Ramanathan said. “With the global economy currently experiencing a dynamic environment, manufacturers are striving to improve operational efficiency in their existing plants and are keen to cut down the maintenance and operational costs due to unexpected failure and asset downtime. Realising that the future of manufacturing is likely to be driven by IIoT, companies today are turning their focus toward data ownership, security, and integration with existing infrastructure, with an intent to achieve returns on their investment in these solutions.”

Welding equipment manufacturers should explore these strategic recommendations to increase growth opportunities:

  • Collaborate with technology providers to enhance capabilities and meet varying end-user requirements. Leveraging state-of-the-art technologies and consumables will result in higher-quality welds and cost-savings for end users.
  • Expand the business approach by offering the option to rent welding equipment to reduce capital expenditure.
  • Continue working with traditional channel partners due to their wide reach while exploring alternative distribution and servicing options.
  • Focus on the Middle East, Africa, India, and Southeast Asia regions as these will witness a surge in demand due to increased urbanisation.

 

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Nasmyth Group Appoints New Group Sales Director

Nasmyth Group Appoints New Group Sales Director

Nasmyth Group has appointed Tony Sexton as the Group Sales Director. In his new position, Tony will develop a new integrated, global sales and marketing focus for the Nasmyth Group’s UK engineering businesses and those in the USA, India and the Philippines.  The Group has exciting opportunities for new and more established business across a range of customers and programmes in sectors including Aerospace, Space, Defence, Energy etc.

Tony will lead Nasmyth’s sales, business development and strategic teams to ensure the Group successfully interfaces with global customers and partners and secures this business as we return to a sustained growth phase. Tony will also lead the development of the Group’s digital sales and marketing tools as the world rebuilds from COVID-19.

“We would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge Tony’s strong  contribution to the growth of  Nasmyth and especially the  Systems and Defence Division and we wish him every success in his new role in which he contributes to the integration, continued success and growth of the Nasmyth Group,” commented Peter Smith, Chairman and CEO of Nasmyth Group.

Tony will start his new position in February 2021. Commenting on his new role, Tony said: “Having worked as a member of the Nasmyth Group Senior Management team for over fourteen years, I believe I have the experience and knowledge to develop further the global growth strategy for the future as we begin to emerge from the pandemic.”

Tony joined the company in 2007 as Managing Director of IEC and has more recently held the position of Director of Systems and Defence for both the Nasmyth IEC and Nasmyth CE businesses.

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AMADA WELD TECH Releases The CD-A1000A Capacitive Discharge Welder

AMADA WELD TECH Releases The CD-A1000A Capacitive Discharge Welder

AMADA WELD TECH, INC. has released the CD-A1000A, a 1000 watt-second advanced capacitive discharge welder, ideal for battery tab welding, honeycomb tacking, and welding of conductive terminals. This next generation CD welder is the latest in a long line of CD welders manufactured by AMADA WELD TECH.

The unit is automation-ready and features dual pulse output with control and monitoring of both pulses. The dual pulse function helps overcome surface inconsistencies –such as dirt and oil contamination – during the first pulse and makes consistent welds with the second. A built-in process monitor measures peak current for both pulses; this value is displayed after each weld. Upper and lower limits can be set for both pulses to ensure weld consistency. An option to inhibit Pulse 2 if Pulse 1 is out of limits prevents weld blow out. The process monitor helps operators assess performance with a color coded bar graph that gives operators an instant weld history of in limit/out of limit percentages.

CD-A1000A offers up to four selectable pulse widths, increasing the range of welding applications and improving process optimization. Extremely efficient power electronics provide high repetition rates. 63 schedules can be stored locally when a variety of welding processes are planned at the same station.

“The CD-A1000A is the latest generation of advanced CD welders at AMADA WELD TECH.” says Mark Boyle, Product Manager. “Our previous generation units have been workhorses in the battery and aerospace industries. We are excited about this new product that will carry on that tradition and transition those products into modern manufacturing.”

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Emerson’s Shanghai Research And Development Center Recognised For Innovation In Welding And Precision Cleaning

Emerson’s Shanghai Research And Development Center Recognised For Innovation In Welding And Precision Cleaning

Branson R&D Center receives designation for exceptional work delivering high-performance plastic and metal assembly technology to China and the world.

The Shanghai municipal government recognised Emerson’s Branson Research and Development Center for its contributions to technical innovation in ultrasonic, laser, vibration, infrared and thermal plastic welding, as well as ultrasonic metal welding and precision cleaning.

In a Nov. 19 ceremony, Gong Zheng, mayor of Shanghai Municipal People’s Government, presented the designation “Shanghai Multinational Company R&D Center” to Emerson’s David Shen, general manager for Emerson’s Branson welding and assembly products. The Center, which employs a staff of more than 30 R&D personnel, was one of nine organisations recognised that day for meeting specific investment, employment, facility, and technology transfer and adoption benchmarks set by the government.

“China’s industrial supply chain is undergoing a rapid economic recovery, a factor that has injected confidence into the global fight against COVID-19,” said Shen. “We will continue to adhere to the localised development strategy of ‘in China, for China,’ using innovative technologies and industry expertise, proactively focusing on new product development, and contributing to the transformation and upgrading of industry.”

As a large-scale, comprehensive ultrasonic equipment production and technology development enterprise, Emerson is committed to technological innovation in the fields of plastic welding, ultrasonic metal welding and precision cleaning.

Shen added that as a trusted welding expert for leading companies in various industries in China, Emerson will continue to advance welding technology, provide customers with professional and reliable customised welding application solutions, and help customers to succeed in light of new market trends. “The strength of our research and development expertise contributes to this effort,” he noted.

The plastic and metal welding experts at the multinational center in Shanghai have played a primary role in developing and introducing key Emerson technologies to China and to the world. These include the Branson GLX-Micro ultrasonic plastic welder, the Branson GL-300 laser welder, the Branson GMX-20 ultrasonic metal spot welding platform, and the Branson GCX ultrasonic generator for precision ultrasonic cleaning systems.

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Pulsed Micro Arc Welding For Coil Terminations Increases Line Throughput

Pulsed Micro Arc Welding for Coil Terminations Increases Line Throughput

Coils with multiple termination points can be welded at one automation station. Article by James Tod, Amada Miyachi UK.

Pulse micro arc welding is a good choice for coil termination applications, especially as coils are getting smaller and smaller. Other processes do not lend themselves as well for these applications. For example, it can be difficult for lasers to target the pins, while resistance welding is not practical due to electrode size, and soldering involves potentially hazardous fluxes. Multiple output pulsed arc welders are available that offer great automation layout flexibility and increase production line throughput.

Pulse Micro Arc Welding Basics

Pulse micro arc welding is a zero-contact process in which an electrical arc is struck between an electrode and target component. The arc generates very high and concentrated energy density, which results in high local temperatures that can be used for welding. Sophisticated closed loop power supplies are used to establish and maintain the arc under precisely controlled electrical conditions.

The micro arc coil termination process requires wire to be wound onto the pin in a uniform fashion and density. The welding process is accomplished by heating the pin and encapsulating the wire in the molten pin material. The wound pin is positioned close to a welding electrode and an arc struck between the pin and the electrode.

Operators profile the energy and current within the arc in terms of rate of rise, period of peak, and downward cooling to control the rate at which the pin begins to melt back. The process of melting the pin back creates a molten ball that causes the wire and its insulation to melt simultaneously, thus welding the wire to the pin.

Material Type is Critical to the Process

With micro arc welding, the materials must flow together based on the heat generated by the welding arc and the surface tension of the materials. Any contamination can cause the materials to fail to fuse with one another.

Wire insulation is critical because it must be broken down by the heat in the weld before the materials can fuse with one another. In the process, the pin is heated directly and the wire indirectly; if the wire insulation remains intact during the weld, the pin will be melted but the wire will not. Pulsed micro arc termination welding works best with wire insulation rated for temperatures of 180 deg C or lower.

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AMADA WELD TECH Introduces Jupiter Series Of Modular Systems For Precision Joining

AMADA WELD TECH Introduces Jupiter Series Of Modular Systems For Precision Joining

AMADA WELD TECH has launched its Jupiter series of modular systems for precision joining, available for laser welding, laser marking, resistance welding, micro arc welding, and hot bar bonding applications. Jupiter modular systems can be equipped with all joining process modules available from AMADA WELD TECH to provide solutions to customers.

With the Jupiter series, customers purchase an automation platform from a global joining equipment leader and receive intensive process development support in AMADA WELD TECH application development centers. Joint early stage process development in AMADA WELD TECH labs ensures that customers receive the ideal system solution for years of high-quality production. Any welding, soldering, bonding, brazing, laser micromachining, and laser marking application can be handled by equipment in the Jupiter series.

The Jupiter modular system platform is a flexible system that comes in four sizes, so it is adaptable to specific production requirements. The stable platform enables connections of very high quality and accuracy. The modular design is configurable to fit all process components and modules. The Jupiter models feature an ergonomic system design with high quality components, designed for 24/7 continuous production. All models are equipped with a human-machine interface (HMI) with touchscreen for easy programming and standard safety features.

Control systems, based upon a programmable logic controller (PLC) or industrial PC, collect all available process parameters and process data into one control system. The data can be stored in local and remote storage areas, all engineered to seamlessly integrate with an Industry 4.0 factory concept.

Optional features for the Jupiter systems include a combustion suppression unit (CSU) for battery pack welding; a transport system with two individual belts that can be configured for a wide range of product carriers, including transfer systems; an automatic cleaning station for electrodes and thermodes; a “Not OK” bin to separate products outside the control limits from those within control limits; and a range of water cooling options. Also available are upgraded data collection and traceability functionalities, including a barcode reader or a label printer; and interfaces for a variety of robotic systems.

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PTG Opens £1.6 Million Friction Stir Welding Research Centre

PTG Opens £1.6 Million Friction Stir Welding Research Centre

Precision Technologies Group (PTG) has announced the opening of a new £1.6 million friction stir welding research centre at its UK-based headquarters and machine tools manufacturing facility. Equipped with PTG Powerstir single-head gantry type and dual weld-head FSW machines, the new centre offers exciting opportunities for prototyping, product and child-part development, materials testing, production trials and low-volume production.

“Our FSW research centre has been established to assist manufacturers in developing new products and processes, as well as better understanding the immense capabilities that PTG Powerstir machines offer,” comments PTG regional sales director, Mark Curran. “By increasing their knowledge of the FSW process, we can also assist Tier 1 and Tier 2 automotive supply chain businesses in becoming more confident and proficient in tendering for manufacturing projects they may not have previously considered.

“With governments around the world setting increasingly ambitious targets for the wholesale switch to electric vehicles,” he adds, “now could be a particularly good time for organisations who have yet to embrace the advantages of friction stir welding for the production of components such as vehicle panels, skateboard chassis and battery cell housings, to get in touch with us.”

 

Ensuring a tight weld-flatness tolerance

PTG Powerstir dual weld-head FSW machines provide a stable welding process, owing to its ‘matched’ dual-force control systems and balanced upper and lower head welding parameters. This, in turn, minimises post-weld distortion and equips each welded assembly with an improved flatness tolerance when compared to existing conventional single-side FSW techniques.

 

Reduced wall thickness

“In addition to providing a state-of-the-art means of joining metals and achieving extremely high-strength results, it is also important to consider that in many instances, the use of friction stir welding also allows for reduced wall thickness – an important aspect in reducing vehicle weight,” says Mark Curran. “As the friction stir welding process generates very little heat, the crystalline structure of the metal remains unchanged, retaining its original strength. There is no need for inert gas, no need for heat-treating post weld, and no requirement for additional surface finishing.”

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‘Silver’ Welders To Surf The Industrial 4.0 Wave With Collaborative Robots

‘Silver’ Welders to Surf the Industrial 4.0 Wave with Collaborative Robots

In industries facing a grave shortfall of skilled welders, collaborative robots, or cobots, can provide the much needed relief to keep up productivity and production, while retaining existing human workforce as well. By Darrell Adams, Universal Robots

There is a global labour shortage in the welding scene today. Business leaders are struggling to find skilled welders, while traditional industrial welding robots are expensive and challenging to adapt to transient and iterative production runs.

The average age of a welder in the United States today is about 55 years old, with fewer than 20 percent under the age of 35, and is slated to run into a deficit of 400,000 welders by 2024, according to a study by the American Welding Society.

And North America is not even the dominant market for welding. That crown goes to Asia Pacific, with a market size of US$7.04B in 2019, according to Fortune Business Insights, with a sizable demand from construction, automotive steel, and marine industries. Asia Pacific is likely to run into a deficit for skilled welders like America, with declining birth rates as the key culprit.

Already, countries such as Japan, Taiwan, and South Korea are facing this problem. For example, by 2060, 40 percent of Japanese population will be over the age of 65, according to a report by The Guardian, and their workforce will be unable to handle the nation’s industrial and economic demands. And that is where automation comes in, including welding.

Embracing Cobots to Retain Staff

Traditionally, robots and automation may be perceived to be a bane to human livelihoods. However, there is a class of robots, known as collaborative robots (cobots), that work nicely alongside humans.

In industries facing a grave shortfall of skilled welders, cobots can provide the much needed relief to keep up productivity and production, while retaining existing human workforce as well.

Unlike larger industrial robots, cobots are nimble and small, much more affordable compared to large industrial robots, and are easy to set up and operate. In the case of Universal Robots’ cobots, they are quick and easy to commission in-house for simple tasks without any expertise in robotics or programming. For more complex applications, Univeral Robots has a comprehensive network of Certified Systems Integrators and Authorised Training Centres that will help businesses get started so that human operators without prior programming experience or knowledge can handle day-to-day operations after the initial installation.

For example, the Vectis Cobot Welding Tool powered by Universal Robots’ UR10e cobot allows human operators to easily and safely design and deploy automated welding jobs. Welders can transition rather easily to become cobot-based welding operators.

“We wanted to build our cobot-based welder on this platform, providing a human-centric and welder-friendly operating ethos, that manufacturers in many other industry verticals enjoy,” says Josh Pawley, director of business development and co-founder of Vectis Automation.

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3D Laser Vision Systems For Industrial Welding Robots

3D Laser Vision Systems For Industrial Welding Robots

By equipping welding robots with “vision” and artificial sensory perception, part and positional variations can be adjusted in real-time, making it possible to account for variations such as inconsistencies in tool fixturing, deviations in part fit-up, weld seam geometry, and weld seam direction, during welding. Article by Wee How Tan, Servo-Robot.

Unlike skilled human welders, welding robots don’t have any natural intelligence nor cognitive senses. A robot will only perform what it has been programmed to do and move to where the program tells it to go. How good a robot can weld is therefore largely dependent on the skill and experience of the operator who programmed it. Without this imparted intelligence, the robot will weld “blind”.

To put the robot on the required trajectory at all times, the operator needs to constantly make changes to adapt the robot program to account for not only whatever is in front and around the robot arm, but also the variations in the part that the robot is welding.

Nowadays, a custom fab shop may fabricate a part to fulfil a large-volume order and then a few months later, it may receive another order for the same part again. For cashflow reasons, most customers want to avoid holding a large inventory of the same parts so they only order what they need at a particular time and then reorder when they need the parts again.

Owing to variations in forming and upstream cutting processes and other factors, different batches of the same part may not be exactly the same especially if they are supplied months apart. This means that the robot program made for a previous batch of parts will have to be adjusted for the new batch to account for variations between the batches.

This would not pose a problem if it is always the same part. However, fab shops invest in robotic welding systems to handle many different parts in variable quantities. Apart from having to build the tool fixtures to hold each new part, fab shops also have to manually program the robot and then adjust the program to account for the variations in each different batch of the same parts.

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