skip to Main Content
Emerson’s Shanghai Research And Development Center Recognised For Innovation In Welding And Precision Cleaning

Emerson’s Shanghai Research And Development Center Recognised For Innovation In Welding And Precision Cleaning

Branson R&D Center receives designation for exceptional work delivering high-performance plastic and metal assembly technology to China and the world.

The Shanghai municipal government recognised Emerson’s Branson Research and Development Center for its contributions to technical innovation in ultrasonic, laser, vibration, infrared and thermal plastic welding, as well as ultrasonic metal welding and precision cleaning.

In a Nov. 19 ceremony, Gong Zheng, mayor of Shanghai Municipal People’s Government, presented the designation “Shanghai Multinational Company R&D Center” to Emerson’s David Shen, general manager for Emerson’s Branson welding and assembly products. The Center, which employs a staff of more than 30 R&D personnel, was one of nine organisations recognised that day for meeting specific investment, employment, facility, and technology transfer and adoption benchmarks set by the government.

“China’s industrial supply chain is undergoing a rapid economic recovery, a factor that has injected confidence into the global fight against COVID-19,” said Shen. “We will continue to adhere to the localised development strategy of ‘in China, for China,’ using innovative technologies and industry expertise, proactively focusing on new product development, and contributing to the transformation and upgrading of industry.”

As a large-scale, comprehensive ultrasonic equipment production and technology development enterprise, Emerson is committed to technological innovation in the fields of plastic welding, ultrasonic metal welding and precision cleaning.

Shen added that as a trusted welding expert for leading companies in various industries in China, Emerson will continue to advance welding technology, provide customers with professional and reliable customised welding application solutions, and help customers to succeed in light of new market trends. “The strength of our research and development expertise contributes to this effort,” he noted.

The plastic and metal welding experts at the multinational center in Shanghai have played a primary role in developing and introducing key Emerson technologies to China and to the world. These include the Branson GLX-Micro ultrasonic plastic welder, the Branson GL-300 laser welder, the Branson GMX-20 ultrasonic metal spot welding platform, and the Branson GCX ultrasonic generator for precision ultrasonic cleaning systems.

For other exclusive articles, visit www.equipment-news.com.

 

WANT MORE INSIDER NEWS? SUBSCRIBE TO OUR DIGITAL MAGAZINE NOW!

FOLLOW US ON: LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter

 

Pulsed Micro Arc Welding For Coil Terminations Increases Line Throughput

Pulsed Micro Arc Welding for Coil Terminations Increases Line Throughput

Coils with multiple termination points can be welded at one automation station. Article by James Tod, Amada Miyachi UK.

Pulse micro arc welding is a good choice for coil termination applications, especially as coils are getting smaller and smaller. Other processes do not lend themselves as well for these applications. For example, it can be difficult for lasers to target the pins, while resistance welding is not practical due to electrode size, and soldering involves potentially hazardous fluxes. Multiple output pulsed arc welders are available that offer great automation layout flexibility and increase production line throughput.

Pulse Micro Arc Welding Basics

Pulse micro arc welding is a zero-contact process in which an electrical arc is struck between an electrode and target component. The arc generates very high and concentrated energy density, which results in high local temperatures that can be used for welding. Sophisticated closed loop power supplies are used to establish and maintain the arc under precisely controlled electrical conditions.

The micro arc coil termination process requires wire to be wound onto the pin in a uniform fashion and density. The welding process is accomplished by heating the pin and encapsulating the wire in the molten pin material. The wound pin is positioned close to a welding electrode and an arc struck between the pin and the electrode.

Operators profile the energy and current within the arc in terms of rate of rise, period of peak, and downward cooling to control the rate at which the pin begins to melt back. The process of melting the pin back creates a molten ball that causes the wire and its insulation to melt simultaneously, thus welding the wire to the pin.

Material Type is Critical to the Process

With micro arc welding, the materials must flow together based on the heat generated by the welding arc and the surface tension of the materials. Any contamination can cause the materials to fail to fuse with one another.

Wire insulation is critical because it must be broken down by the heat in the weld before the materials can fuse with one another. In the process, the pin is heated directly and the wire indirectly; if the wire insulation remains intact during the weld, the pin will be melted but the wire will not. Pulsed micro arc termination welding works best with wire insulation rated for temperatures of 180 deg C or lower.

To continue reading this article, head on over to our Ebook!

For other exclusive articles, visit www.equipment-news.com.

 

Check these articles out:

Advantages of Collaborative Development

NASA Develops New 3D Printing Method For Producing Rocket Engine Nozzles

AMADA WELD TECH Announces New Company Name

3D Metalforge Partners Ultimaker to Launch SEA’s Largest Industrial FFF Print Facility In Singapore

Cutting Costs, While Saving The Planet For Tool Makers

LVD Launches New Large-Format Laser Cutting Machine

 

WANT MORE INSIDER NEWS? SUBSCRIBE TO OUR DIGITAL MAGAZINE NOW!

FOLLOW US ON: LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter

 

AMADA WELD TECH Introduces Jupiter Series Of Modular Systems For Precision Joining

AMADA WELD TECH Introduces Jupiter Series Of Modular Systems For Precision Joining

AMADA WELD TECH has launched its Jupiter series of modular systems for precision joining, available for laser welding, laser marking, resistance welding, micro arc welding, and hot bar bonding applications. Jupiter modular systems can be equipped with all joining process modules available from AMADA WELD TECH to provide solutions to customers.

With the Jupiter series, customers purchase an automation platform from a global joining equipment leader and receive intensive process development support in AMADA WELD TECH application development centers. Joint early stage process development in AMADA WELD TECH labs ensures that customers receive the ideal system solution for years of high-quality production. Any welding, soldering, bonding, brazing, laser micromachining, and laser marking application can be handled by equipment in the Jupiter series.

The Jupiter modular system platform is a flexible system that comes in four sizes, so it is adaptable to specific production requirements. The stable platform enables connections of very high quality and accuracy. The modular design is configurable to fit all process components and modules. The Jupiter models feature an ergonomic system design with high quality components, designed for 24/7 continuous production. All models are equipped with a human-machine interface (HMI) with touchscreen for easy programming and standard safety features.

Control systems, based upon a programmable logic controller (PLC) or industrial PC, collect all available process parameters and process data into one control system. The data can be stored in local and remote storage areas, all engineered to seamlessly integrate with an Industry 4.0 factory concept.

Optional features for the Jupiter systems include a combustion suppression unit (CSU) for battery pack welding; a transport system with two individual belts that can be configured for a wide range of product carriers, including transfer systems; an automatic cleaning station for electrodes and thermodes; a “Not OK” bin to separate products outside the control limits from those within control limits; and a range of water cooling options. Also available are upgraded data collection and traceability functionalities, including a barcode reader or a label printer; and interfaces for a variety of robotic systems.

For other exclusive articles, visit www.equipment-news.com.

 

Check these articles out:

Accelerating the Journey to Series Production

Fraunhofer Lighthouse Project futureAM Gets Metallic 3D Printing In Shape For Industrial Use

TRUMPF Launches New Programming Software for Laser Tube Cutting Machines

Continuing the Automation Legacy

Traceability In The Medical Sector—Technical Challenge

Are Machining Centres Taking Over Jig Bore Work?

 

WANT MORE INSIDER NEWS? SUBSCRIBE TO OUR DIGITAL MAGAZINE NOW!

FOLLOW US ON: LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter

 

 

PTG Opens £1.6 Million Friction Stir Welding Research Centre

PTG Opens £1.6 Million Friction Stir Welding Research Centre

Precision Technologies Group (PTG) has announced the opening of a new £1.6 million friction stir welding research centre at its UK-based headquarters and machine tools manufacturing facility. Equipped with PTG Powerstir single-head gantry type and dual weld-head FSW machines, the new centre offers exciting opportunities for prototyping, product and child-part development, materials testing, production trials and low-volume production.

“Our FSW research centre has been established to assist manufacturers in developing new products and processes, as well as better understanding the immense capabilities that PTG Powerstir machines offer,” comments PTG regional sales director, Mark Curran. “By increasing their knowledge of the FSW process, we can also assist Tier 1 and Tier 2 automotive supply chain businesses in becoming more confident and proficient in tendering for manufacturing projects they may not have previously considered.

“With governments around the world setting increasingly ambitious targets for the wholesale switch to electric vehicles,” he adds, “now could be a particularly good time for organisations who have yet to embrace the advantages of friction stir welding for the production of components such as vehicle panels, skateboard chassis and battery cell housings, to get in touch with us.”

 

Ensuring a tight weld-flatness tolerance

PTG Powerstir dual weld-head FSW machines provide a stable welding process, owing to its ‘matched’ dual-force control systems and balanced upper and lower head welding parameters. This, in turn, minimises post-weld distortion and equips each welded assembly with an improved flatness tolerance when compared to existing conventional single-side FSW techniques.

 

Reduced wall thickness

“In addition to providing a state-of-the-art means of joining metals and achieving extremely high-strength results, it is also important to consider that in many instances, the use of friction stir welding also allows for reduced wall thickness – an important aspect in reducing vehicle weight,” says Mark Curran. “As the friction stir welding process generates very little heat, the crystalline structure of the metal remains unchanged, retaining its original strength. There is no need for inert gas, no need for heat-treating post weld, and no requirement for additional surface finishing.”

For other exclusive articles, visit www.equipment-news.com.

 

Check these articles out:

Automation And Digitalisation Pave The Way Forward For Smart Metal Industries

Coherent Launches Turnkey Solution for Precision Metal Parts Welding

Amada Miyachi Europe Releases New Welding Power Supplies

Faster Robot Programming With Hypertherm Robotmaster Version 7.2

3D Laser Vision Systems For Industrial Welding Robots

 

WANT MORE INSIDER NEWS? SUBSCRIBE TO OUR DIGITAL MAGAZINE NOW!

FOLLOW US ON: LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter

 

 

 

‘Silver’ Welders To Surf The Industrial 4.0 Wave With Collaborative Robots

‘Silver’ Welders to Surf the Industrial 4.0 Wave with Collaborative Robots

In industries facing a grave shortfall of skilled welders, collaborative robots, or cobots, can provide the much needed relief to keep up productivity and production, while retaining existing human workforce as well. By Darrell Adams, Universal Robots

There is a global labour shortage in the welding scene today. Business leaders are struggling to find skilled welders, while traditional industrial welding robots are expensive and challenging to adapt to transient and iterative production runs.

The average age of a welder in the United States today is about 55 years old, with fewer than 20 percent under the age of 35, and is slated to run into a deficit of 400,000 welders by 2024, according to a study by the American Welding Society.

And North America is not even the dominant market for welding. That crown goes to Asia Pacific, with a market size of US$7.04B in 2019, according to Fortune Business Insights, with a sizable demand from construction, automotive steel, and marine industries. Asia Pacific is likely to run into a deficit for skilled welders like America, with declining birth rates as the key culprit.

Already, countries such as Japan, Taiwan, and South Korea are facing this problem. For example, by 2060, 40 percent of Japanese population will be over the age of 65, according to a report by The Guardian, and their workforce will be unable to handle the nation’s industrial and economic demands. And that is where automation comes in, including welding.

Embracing Cobots to Retain Staff

Traditionally, robots and automation may be perceived to be a bane to human livelihoods. However, there is a class of robots, known as collaborative robots (cobots), that work nicely alongside humans.

In industries facing a grave shortfall of skilled welders, cobots can provide the much needed relief to keep up productivity and production, while retaining existing human workforce as well.

Unlike larger industrial robots, cobots are nimble and small, much more affordable compared to large industrial robots, and are easy to set up and operate. In the case of Universal Robots’ cobots, they are quick and easy to commission in-house for simple tasks without any expertise in robotics or programming. For more complex applications, Univeral Robots has a comprehensive network of Certified Systems Integrators and Authorised Training Centres that will help businesses get started so that human operators without prior programming experience or knowledge can handle day-to-day operations after the initial installation.

For example, the Vectis Cobot Welding Tool powered by Universal Robots’ UR10e cobot allows human operators to easily and safely design and deploy automated welding jobs. Welders can transition rather easily to become cobot-based welding operators.

“We wanted to build our cobot-based welder on this platform, providing a human-centric and welder-friendly operating ethos, that manufacturers in many other industry verticals enjoy,” says Josh Pawley, director of business development and co-founder of Vectis Automation.

To continue reading this article, head on over to our Ebook!

For other exclusive articles, visit www.equipment-news.com.

 

Check these articles out:

Universal Robots Declares “National Cobot Awareness Month” In January

Universal Robots Future-Proofs Production Processes In Southeast Asia With Collaborative Robots

Industry 5.0: The Future Of Manufacturing In 2035

New Update For Hypertherm Robotmaster Robotic Software

Cobots – Revolutionising Businesses in Southeast Asia

Global Robotics Technology Market to Top $170B by 2027

Automation Trends in Metalworking

 

WANT MORE INSIDER NEWS? SUBSCRIBE TO OUR DIGITAL MAGAZINE NOW!

FOLLOW US ON: LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter

 

 

3D Laser Vision Systems For Industrial Welding Robots

3D Laser Vision Systems For Industrial Welding Robots

By equipping welding robots with “vision” and artificial sensory perception, part and positional variations can be adjusted in real-time, making it possible to account for variations such as inconsistencies in tool fixturing, deviations in part fit-up, weld seam geometry, and weld seam direction, during welding. Article by Wee How Tan, Servo-Robot.

Unlike skilled human welders, welding robots don’t have any natural intelligence nor cognitive senses. A robot will only perform what it has been programmed to do and move to where the program tells it to go. How good a robot can weld is therefore largely dependent on the skill and experience of the operator who programmed it. Without this imparted intelligence, the robot will weld “blind”.

To put the robot on the required trajectory at all times, the operator needs to constantly make changes to adapt the robot program to account for not only whatever is in front and around the robot arm, but also the variations in the part that the robot is welding.

Nowadays, a custom fab shop may fabricate a part to fulfil a large-volume order and then a few months later, it may receive another order for the same part again. For cashflow reasons, most customers want to avoid holding a large inventory of the same parts so they only order what they need at a particular time and then reorder when they need the parts again.

Owing to variations in forming and upstream cutting processes and other factors, different batches of the same part may not be exactly the same especially if they are supplied months apart. This means that the robot program made for a previous batch of parts will have to be adjusted for the new batch to account for variations between the batches.

This would not pose a problem if it is always the same part. However, fab shops invest in robotic welding systems to handle many different parts in variable quantities. Apart from having to build the tool fixtures to hold each new part, fab shops also have to manually program the robot and then adjust the program to account for the variations in each different batch of the same parts.

To continue reading this article, head on over to our Ebook!

For other exclusive articles, visit www.equipment-news.com.

 

Check these articles out:

SESTO Robotics Launches Autonomous Mobile Robot For Material Handling In Space-Scarce Manufacturing

Faster Robot Programming With Hypertherm Robotmaster Version 7.2

New Dedicated Automotive Stud Welding System Provider Created

Siemens Launches IPP&E Solution For Aerospace And Defence

Hanoi Striving To Become New Location For Iphone Production

Robots On Subscription: RaaS Model In The APAC Region

Amada Miyachi Europe: MM-L300A Laser Weld Monitor

Trumpf Enters The World Of Automated Arc Welding

 

WANT MORE INSIDER NEWS? SUBSCRIBE TO OUR DIGITAL MAGAZINE NOW!

FOLLOW US ON: LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter

 

 

Focus On Reliability

Focus On Reliability

Three-dimensional energy chain ensures long service life and offers ergonomics in high-precision welding systems. Article by igus GmbH. 

Whether in motor vehicle manufacturing or shipbuilding, in precision engineering or general industry, welding is one of the most important joining processes. To guarantee high-quality joints, the components installed in the welding systems must be durable, have a long service life and withstand the harsh manufacturing environment.

For the last 50 years, FPT Industrie S.p.A.  has been manufacturing CNC milling and drilling machines for the general mechanical industry, tool and mould making, as well as for the aerospace industry. Customers can be found on the one hand in Italy, and on the other in the global market. Committed to technology, precision and reliability, FPT began to focus on machines for friction stir welding (FSW) more than a decade ago. The offer also includes its own 4.0 platform and a whole range of positioning and clamping tools.

High-strength and economical joints

The “StirRob” welding robot from FPT works with FSW technology and includes appropriate software and various accessories. A high-speed rotary cutter applies strong pressure during friction stir welding. It creates heat, which makes the two counter pieces malleable. Both materials are mixed in the process and brought into the plastic state. At the end of the process, the welded elements cannot be distinguished. The robot was created in a joint development project with Fanuc and enables the joining of materials such as aluminium, its alloys as well as copper, titanium and steel, which are normally difficult to weld together. In fact, the part on which the joining is done has metallurgical properties that are superior to those of the two raw materials and even withstands bending by 90 deg at the weld seam.

According to Fanuc, the automotive and aviation industries, in particular, benefit from this six-axis robot with FSW welding technology, whereby welding takes place without fumes or radiation. Furthermore, the process requires less energy than conventional welding, thereby reducing costs. The double measuring system integrated in the robot with encoders, which are located both on the motors and on the joints, ensures both the pressure required by the FSW and the desired precision. 

Flexible solutions and fast delivery required

To adapt the high-precision, high-rigidity machine to the requirements of the FSW process, torsional energy chains are used on the robot. Here the choice fell on the three-dimensional triflex R energy chain from motion plastics specialist igus GmbH.

When choosing a supplier, Renzo Vezzaro, Senior Sales and Technical Engineer at FPT Industrie, attaches particular importance to product quality, flexible solutions and fast delivery.

“We have been working with igus for 25 years. They give us precise technical support and safe guarantees, which make life easier,” he says. The service life of the energy chain must last at least 20 years for a machine that is in use 24 hours a day, seven days a week. An ergonomic structure is also desirable for the operators in order to reduce the time required for the assembly and disassembly of the energy chains.

A study carried out in co-operation with Refa Consult shows the enhanced time savings through effective design of the energy supply chains and their accessories: the optimal design and structure of energy supply systems can save up to 60 percent of the time per work step and increase productivity.

To continue reading this article, head on over to our Ebook!

For other exclusive articles, visit www.equipment-news.com.

 

Check these articles out:

Faster Robot Programming With Hypertherm Robotmaster Version 7.2

Coherent Launches Turnkey Solution for Precision Metal Parts Welding

ANCA Motion’s Multi-Axis Servo System Conserves 96 Percent Of Energy Wastage

Amada Miyachi Europe: MM-L300A Laser Weld Monitor

OnRobot Launches VGC10 Compact—A Highly Customisable Electric Vacuum Gripper

Flexible Gripping Delivers the Future of Automation Today

Caring For Your Cables

 

WANT MORE INSIDER NEWS? SUBSCRIBE TO OUR DIGITAL MAGAZINE NOW!

FOLLOW US ON: LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter

 

 

Electric Motor ‘Hairpin’ Processing Using Laser

Electric Motor ‘Hairpin’ Processing Using Laser

Laser technology provides a high level of flexibility and quality when processing hairpins for the electric motors. Article by TRUMPF.

(Above, left) Hairpin with PAI coating after blast off process. High edge quality and low pulse overlap as well as line overlap. (Above, right) A row of single pulses. (Bottom) Surface after ablation with blast off process. Single spots are visible. This can be reduced by using repetitions with a higher frequency and higher line overlap after decoating.

Nowadays, manufacturers of electric motors are also looking for more productive processes for volume quantities, with the same high-quality requirements when it comes to the welding result. An important impetus here is achieving a higher degree of automation to be able to produce higher quantities.

One method in the construction of stators has therefore largely prevailed: Instead of winding copper wire around the individual stator grooves, as was often the case before, manufacturers have started embedding rectangular copper rods—called “hairpins” due to their shape—into the entire groove using compressed air. The typical edge lengths of the rectangular cross section of the hairpins is between 2 and 4 mm. The process achieves higher process speeds and can easily be automated. As the hairpins are stiffer than round wires, their alignment in the motor can be better controlled. The larger fill factor also results in a higher thermal load capacity, and higher motor power.

The copper rods are coated with an insulating layer, which requires ablation at both ends locally—called hairpin stripping—to enable contacting. Pulsed laser processing is suitable here to strip the hairpins. Compared to mechanical processes, such as planing and milling, laser processing is up to 80 percent more productive. Once the hairpins have been embedded in the grooves, protruding ends on the top and bottom of the stator are twisted together using a fixture (necking) or fixed in place, and then welded for contacting. The ends are not always ideally aligned to each other, however. If you use automated remote welding, a camera-based sensor system integrated in the laser optics helps achieve a reliable and reproducible result, and therefore the highest possible current flow.

Stripping of Hairpins

Common insulating layers for copper hairpins are polyamide-imides (PAI), polyether ether ketone (PEEK), and polyamide-imides with polyimide foil (PAI+FEP).

In the past, PAI coatings were almost exclusively prevalent in the industry, but we are now seeing a tendency towards a steady increase in PEEK and PAI+FEP. However, PAI coatings still have, and are likely to have in the future, the largest share by far.

All of these insulation coatings can be burnt away from the copper quickly and in a targeted manner using laser pulse processing. The laser light couples into the insulating layer, heats it up, and burns it off. PEEK behaves as a volume absorber for laser light, anyway; for PAI and PAI+FEP, it is recommended that the first run over is used to carbonize the material in order to increase the absorption. The copper discolours due to the heat influence during laser ablation. This is not relevant for the further processing, however, as the structure of the copper is not changed. Burrs also form at the boundaries to the coated copper, which, in unfavourable circumstances, could lead to the burr becoming stuck on a surrounding component or fixture. The formation of burrs and edges can be optimized, however, through reworking using another femtosecond-pulsed laser.

Hairpin stripping can be done with different types of TRUMPF ns laser. Most common is the TruMicro 7000 series with a laser power of up to 2 kW (pulse energy 100 mJ) at a pulse repetition rate of 5 to 250 kHz and a pulse duration of 30 ns.

There are two stripping processes for the hairpins depending on the coating type: 

  • For coatings which are transparent to the laser a “blast off” process can be used. 
  • For non-transparent coatings an evaporation process is needed. 

Click here to read the full version of the article in the April 2020 issue of Asia Pacific Metalworking Equipment News.

 

For other exclusive articles, visit www.equipment-news.com.

 

Check these articles out:

NUM Launches Form Compensation Option For NUMROTO Tool Grinding Software

AMADA WELD TECH Announces New Company Name

Fibre Laser or CO2 Laser—Which Will Prevail?

Fight Against Corona: TRUMPF Retrofits Mini-Lasers For Ventilators

Hexagon Releases Complete Solution For Laser Scanning On The Machine Tool

Amada Miyachi Europe: MM-L300A Laser Weld Monitor

TRUMPF Benefits From E-Mobility

Making the Industry More Sustainable with the Circular Economy

Helping You Address The New Electro-Mobility Challenge

 

 

WANT MORE INSIDER NEWS? SUBSCRIBE TO OUR DIGITAL MAGAZINE NOW!

FOLLOW US ON: LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter

 

 

AMADA WELD TECH Announces New Company Name

AMADA WELD TECH Announces New Company Name

AMADA WELD TECH, formerly AMADA MIYACHI EUROPE has announced its new company name, effective April 1, 2020. This name change will allow the company to present themselves as an AMADA group company with the highest experience in welding and associated precision technologies.

The new name will soon appear on all mailings, invoices, packaging, and other promotional materials.

The company itself remains the same, simply under a new name. The same commitment to customers, products, quality of service, and employees will continue unchanged. The extensive range of equipment and systems in Laser Welding, Laser Marking, Laser Cutting, Resistance Welding, Hermetic Sealing and Hot Bar Reflow Soldering & Bonding will remain at the highest quality that our customers have come to know and expect.

AMADA WELD TECH requests that customers update records accordingly and address all future business correspondence to the new name, AMADA WELD TECH.

 

For other exclusive articles, visit www.equipment-news.com.

 

Check these articles out:

Faccin Metal Forming Taking the Middle East By Storm

Making the Industry More Sustainable with the Circular Economy

Mitsubishi Motors To Invest Seven Billion Baht In Its Thailand Facility

Outlook For Welding And Cutting Equipment Market

Fight Against Corona: TRUMPF Retrofits Mini-Lasers For Ventilators

Marposs Joins 5G-SMART Project To Show How 5G Boosts Smart Manufacturing

Coherent Improves Laser Welding With SmartWeld+

Coherent Improves Laser Welding With SmartWeld+

 

 

WANT MORE INSIDER NEWS? SUBSCRIBE TO OUR DIGITAL MAGAZINE NOW!

FOLLOW US ON: LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter

 

 

PTG Introduces Powerstir Dual Weld-Head Friction Stir Welding For Electric Vehicle OEMs

PTG Introduces Powerstir Dual Weld-Head Friction Stir Welding For Electric Vehicle OEMs

UK-based Precision Technologies Group (PTG) has introduced a number of dual weld-head FSW models specifically for use in the volume production of automotive battery tray floor assemblies from extruded aluminium panels.

Ensuring a tight weld-flatness tolerance

PTG has been assisting automotive OEMs in producing lightweight, robust and aesthetic components for battery electric vehicles (BEV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV). Aimed directly at manufacturers of skateboard chassis structures, the dual weld-head process developed by PTG ensures that a tight weld-flatness tolerance is achieved during battery tray floor construction.

A tight weld-flatness tolerance is essential to ensure that each battery cell sits perfectly level within its housing. PTG Powerstir dual weld-head FSW machines provide an even and stable welding process – something that is achieved thanks to the company’s unique ‘matched’ dual-force control systems and balanced upper and lower head welding parameters. The result is exceptionally stable friction stir welding by both the upper and lower weld heads, producing matched weld seams with balanced heat input. This, in turn, minimises post-weld distortion and equips each welded assembly with a significantly improved flatness tolerance when compared to existing conventional single-side FSW techniques.

High-output production cell

As aluminium extrusion lines usually produce panels of 300 mm to 600 mm wide, PTG has also developed a fully automated, high-output Powerstir FSW production cell for the rapid friction stir welding of multiple extrusions, to create single structures for fabrication into battery tray floors. These structures are typically up to 2.4 metres wide.

“Our dual weld-head FSW technologies, whereby both sides of an extrusion are welded simultaneously, not only remove the time-consuming process of lifting and turning extrusions between welds, but also allow for equal heat dispersion which results in minimal distortion,” comments PTG Powerstir Regional Sales Director, Mark Curran.

In the PTG Powerstir dual weld-head FSW process, typically four to 12 individual child-part extrusions are brought together for assembly. Following gantry loading, each extrusion is automatically positioned and clamped ready for friction stir welding, after which the partially completed vehicle component is automatically repositioned, ready for the next panel to be welded in place.

Reduced wall thickness

“In addition to providing automotive OEMs with a state-of-the-art means of joining metals and achieving extremely high-strength results, it is also important to consider that in many instances, the use of friction stir welding also allows for reduced wall thickness – an important aspect in reducing vehicle weight,” adds Mark Curran. “As the friction stir welding process generates very little heat, the crystalline structure of the metal remains unchanged, retaining its original strength. There is no need for inert gas, no need for heat-treating post weld, and no requirement for additional surface finishing.”

High-strength joints that are virtually defect free

Friction stir welding combines frictional heat with precisely controlled forging pressure to produce extremely high-strength joints that are virtually defect free. Due to the very low welding temperature, mechanical distortion is practically eliminated, with minimal Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and an excellent surface finish. Friction stir welding transforms the parent metal from a solid to a plasticised state. This occurs during a process that involves mechanically stirring the materials to be joined together, to form a high integrity, full-penetration welded joint. The Powerstir FSW process is effective on flat plates, cylindrical components and even on parts of irregular thickness. Although used primarily for joining aluminium, the Powerstir process can also be applied to magnesium, copper, titanium and steel alloys.

 

For other exclusive articles, visit www.equipment-news.com.

 

Check these articles out:

New Dedicated Automotive Stud Welding System Provider Created

Fiber Laser Welding Cuts Costs And Improves Results

Innovative Welding Technology Transforms Productivity In Nuclear Project

Outlook For Welding And Cutting Equipment Market

BrightLine Weld – A Revolution In Laser Welding

Coherent Improves Laser Welding With SmartWeld+

Coherent Launches Turnkey Solution for Precision Metal Parts Welding

Amada Miyachi Europe Releases New Welding Power Supplies

Nissin Electric To Move Production From Thailand And Vietnam To Myanma

 

WANT MORE INSIDER NEWS? SUBSCRIBE TO OUR DIGITAL MAGAZINE NOW!

FOLLOW US ON: LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter

 

 

Back To Top